Ces traductions personnelles d'œuvres du poète britannique James Reeves (1909-1978) ont été initialement publiées sur TranslatorsCafe.

Si vous connaissez d'autres poèmes du même auteur qui ne figurent pas dans cette liste, vous pouvez me le signaler ici.

Si vous souhaitez reproduire l'une des traductions ci-dessous sur votre propre site (blog ou autre), merci d'indiquer le nom de l'auteur et d'inclure un lien vers cette page.

Mr Kartoffel

The Snail

Accueil / Home

The Old Wife and the Ghost

Fire

Slowly

Cows

Fireworks

The Sea

The Wind

If Pigs Could Fly

Noah

W

Rough Weather

No fault of ours

The Black Pebble

The Chickamungus

A Pig Tale

Stones by the Sea

Spells

The field of lies

Grim and Gloomy

The Hippocrump

The Double Autumn

Aeons Hence

The Wandering Moon

Mr. Tom Narrow

The Bogus-Boo

The Two Old Women of Mumbling Hill

Giant Thunder

Little Fan

Rabbit and Lark

The Storm Behind the Hill

Mrs Utter

Beech Leaves

The Moonlit Stream

Twenty-six Letters

The Nimp

The Doze

A farthing and a penny

Waiting

The Castle

The Bisk

Grey

The Amperzand

The Song of the Dumb Waiter

Snow Palace

Tree Gowns

The Four Horses

Under Ground

The Snitterjipe

The Grasses

Animals’ Houses

The Nonny

Flowers and Frost

Shiny

Mrs Farleigh-Fashion

Castles and Candlelight

The Catipoce

Vicary Square

The Snyke

A Mermaid Song

What Kind of Music?

Caroline, Caroline

The Osc

A fire I lit

The Grey Horse

Jargon

Queer Things

Others

Miss Petal

Musetta of the Mountains

Stocking and Shirt

Village Sounds

Old Moll

Dr John Hearty

Bells

The Musical Box

You'd Say it was a Wedding

You'd Say it was a Funeral

The Blackbird in the Lilac

Mick

The Footprint

The Two Mice

The Three Unlucky Men

Bluebells and Foxgloves

Run a Little

The Four Letters

Explorers

The Intruder

Yellow Wheels

Things to Remember

A Garden at Night

The Toadstool Wood

Seeds

Trees in the Moonlight

The Grasshopper and the Bird

Uriconium

Troy

The Magic Seeds

Birds in the Forest

The Statue

The Fiddler

Mrs Button

Time to go Home

The Horn

Little Minnie Mystery

The Dizz

Miss Wing

Boating

The Piano

The Street Musician

Rum Lane

Pat’s Fiddle

My Singing Aunt

Mrs Golightly

Poor Rumble

The Three Singing Birds

The Ceremonial Band

Diddling

Bobadil

Mrs Gilfillan

Kingdom Cove

Brand the Blacksmith

The Song of D

Long

Heroes on Horseback

Islands

The Troke

Green Grass

The Kwackagee

Moths and Moonshine

Paper

The Ozalid

Avalon

Vain

Tarlingwell

O Nay!

The Sniggle

Egg to Eat

Rain

X-Roads

Un

Yonder

Sky, Sea, Shore

Zachary Zed

Quiet

In the Train

The Prisoners

Words

Kay

Ragged Robin

The Swan

Leaving Town

Old Crabbed Men

The Password

At the Window

Had I Passion to Match my Skill

The Little Brother

When Two

One Propriety

Ethology

You in Anger

To Help Us

Waters of Life

Let None Lament Acteon

The Tree of Life

Bestiary

Voices Loud and Low

Poet of Birds

Discharged from Hospital

Things to Come

Bruges

The Happy Boy

The Tiger

Grand Opera

Generation of a Critic

Plastic

Demigods

No tears for Miss Macassar

The Blameless One

Rainless

Important Insects

Evolution of a Painter

Command your Devil

An Academic

The Half-full Glass

The Newcomer

Mr Kartoffel

Mr Kartoffel's a whimsical man;
He drinks his beer from a watering can,
And for no good reason that I can see
He fills his pockets with china tea.
He parts his hair with a knife and fork
And takes his ducks on a Sunday walk.
Says he, "If my wife and I should choose
To wear our stockings outside our shoes,
Plant tulip bulbs in the baby's pram
And eat tobacco instead of jam
And fill the bath with cauliflowers,
That's nobody's business at all but ours."
Says Mrs. K., "I may choose to travel
With a sack of grass or a sack of gravel,
Or paint my toes, one black, one white,
Or sit on a bird's nest half the night -
But whatever I do that is rum or rare,
I rather think that is my affair.
So fill up your pockets with stamps and string,
And let us be ready for anything!"
Says Mr. K. to his whimsical wife,
"How can we face the storms of life,
Unless we are ready for anything?
So if you've provided the stamps and the string,
Let us pump up the saddle and harness the horse
And fill him with carrots and custard and sauce,
Let us leap on him lightly and give him a shove
And it's over the sea and away, my love!"

- James Reeves


Monsieur Patate

Monsieur Patate est fort bizarre,
Buvant sa bière à l'arrosoir.
Pour une raison qui m'échappe,
Il a sur lui du thé en grappes,
Se coiffe à l'aide de couverts,
Sort le dimanche ses colverts.
"Si mon épouse et moi chaussons
Nos bas par-dessus nos chaussons,
Changeons la tulipe en tétine,
Mangeons le tabac en tartines
Et préférons les bains de choux,
C'est là notre affaire après tout."
"Je peux choisir de voyager
Équipé d'herbe ou de gravier,
Peindre mes pieds en noir et blanc,
Ou dormir dans le nid d'un paon ;
Quelle que soit ma décision,
Ce ne sont là que mes oignons.
Emplissons nos poches de cire,
Histoire d'être prêts au pire !"
Dit Monsieur Patate à sa femme.
"Comment affronter tant de drames
Si l'on ne s'attend pas au pire ?
Si tu t'es bien munie de cire,
Vite harnachons notre monture,
Nourrissons-la de confiture,
Enfourchons-la le cœur léger
Et c'est parti, ma dulcinée !"

Traduction ©2005 Laurent Chiacchiérini


Haut de page

The Old Wife and the Ghost

There was an old wife and she lived all alone
In a cottage not far from Hitchin:
And one bright night,by the full moon light,
Comes a ghost right into her kitchen.

About that kitchen neat and cleam
'The ghost goes pottering round.
But the poor old wife is deaf as a boot
And so hears never a sound.

The ghost blows up the kitchen fire,
As bold as bold can be;
He helps himself form the larder shelf,
But never a sound hears she.

He blows on his hands to make them warm,
And whistles aloud 'Whee-hee!'
But still as a sack the old soul lies
And never a sound hears she.

From corner to corner he runs about,
And into the cupboard he peeps ;
He rattles the door and bumps on the floor,
But still the old wife sleeps.

Jangle and bang go the pots and pans,
As he throws them all around;
And the plates and mugs and dishes and jugs,
He flings them all to the ground.

Madly the ghost tears up and down
And screams like a storm at sea;
And at last the old wife stirs in her bed-
And it's 'Drat those mice',says she.

Then the first cock crows and morning shows
And the troublesome ghost's away.
But oh!What a pickle the poor wife sees
When she gets up next day.

'Them's tidy big mice ',the old wife thinks,
And off she goes to Hitchin,
And a tidy big cat she fetches back
To keep the mice from her kitchen.

-- James Reeves


La vieille et le fantôme

C'était une vieille compagne
Vivant seule dans sa campagne.
Par une nuit de clair de lune,
Un fantôme hanta sa cuisine.

L'esprit commence à ravager
Cette pièce si bien rangée.
La vieille est sourde comme un pot
et n'entend jamais piper mot.

Il allume le feu dans l'âtre,
Avec le culot d'un bellâtre,
Il se sert au garde-manger,
La vieille n'entend rien bouger.

Il souffle dans ses mains gelées
Et siffle à gorge déployée.
La vieille dort comme une souche
Et n'entendrait pas une mouche.

Il furète dans tous les coins,
Jette un coup d'œil dans le buffet,
Claque la porte, tape des pieds,
La vieille ne s'éveille point.

Il jongle avec les casseroles,
Les plats, les tasses, les couverts,
Les assiettes, les pots, les verres,
Les jetant partout sur le sol.

Le fantôme agit comme un fou
Et hurle à effrayer un loup.
Enfin la vieille sous ses draps
Se dit : ah, les satanés rats !

Puis le coq chante et le jour point,
et le fantôme part au loin.
Oh ! ce que voit la pauvre vieille
Quand au matin elle s'éveille.

Je m'en vais leur jouer un tour,
promet-elle en allant au bourg.
Elle en rapporte un bon gros chat
Pour l'aider à chasser ces rats.

Traduction ©2005 Laurent Chiacchiérini


Haut de page

Slowly

Slowly the tide creeps up the sand,
Slowly the shadows cross the land.
Slowly the cart-horse pulls his mile,
Slowly the old man mounts the stile.

Slowly the hands move round the clock,
Slowly the dew dries on the dock.
Slow is the snail - but slowest of all
The green moss spreads on the old brick wall.

-- James Reeves


Lentement

Lentement la marée va grignotant la plage,
Lentement l'ombre va mangeant le paysage.
Lentement la charrue va creusant son sillon,
Lentement le vieillard gravit le raidillon.

Lentement la trotteuse arpente le cadran,
Lentement la rosée sèche sur le hareng.
L'escargot est lent mais, plus lentement que tous,
Le vieux mur de briques se recouvre de mousse.

Traduction ©2005 Laurent Chiacchiérini


Haut de page

Fireworks

They rise like sudden fiery flowers
That burst upon the night,
Then fall to earth in burning showers
Of crimson, blue and white.

Like buds too wonderful to name,
Each miracle unfolds,
And Catherine-wheels begin to flame
Like whirling marigolds.

Rockets and roman-candles make
An orchard of the sky,
Where magic trees their petals shake
Upon each gazing eye.

-- James Reeves


Artifices

Ils jaillissent dans la nuit calme
Semblables à des fleurs de flammes,
Pour retomber en pluie de feu
De couleur rouge, blanche et bleue.

Tels des boutons en éclosion,
C'est un déluge d'explosions.
Les soleils en s'embrasant donnent
Des jonquilles qui tourbillonnent.

Fusées et chandelles romaines
Font du firmament un verger,
Dont les plus beaux fruits se promènent
Devant nos yeux émerveillés.

Traduction ©2005 Laurent Chiacchiérini


Haut de page

The Wind

I can get through a doorway
Without any key,
And strip the leaves
From the great oak tree.

I can drive storm-clouds
And shake tall towers
Or steal through a garden
And not wake the flowers.

Seas I can move
And ships I can sink;
I can carry a house-top
Or the scent of a pink.

When I am angry
I can rave and riot;
When I am spent,
I lie quiet as quiet.

-- James Reeves


Le vent

Je m'infiltre par une porte
Sans avoir besoin d'une clé.
Quant aux feuilles je les emporte
Loin du chêne où elles sont nées.

J'envoie les nuages d'orage,
Fais trembler les tours à étages
Ou me glisse dans un jardin
Sans en réveiller les jasmins.

Je déchaîne les océans
Et fais chavirer les voiliers,
Charriant le toit d'un bâtiment
Comme le parfum d'un œillet.

Lorsque je me mets en colère,
Je risque de tout dévaster.
Une fois que je suis passé,
Tout redevient calme dans l'air.

Traduction ©2005 Laurent Chiacchiérini


Haut de page

Noah

Noah was an admiral;
Never a one but he
Sailed for forty days and nights
With wife and children three
On such a mighty sea.

Under his tempest-battered deck
This admiral had a zoo;
And all the creatures in the world,
He kept them, two by two-
Ant, hippo, kangaroo,

And every other beast beside,
Of every mould and make.
When tempests howled and thunder growled
How they did cower and quake
To feel the vessel shake!

But Noah was a Carpenter
Had made his ship so sound
That not a soul of crew or zoo
In all that time was drowned
Before they reached dry ground.

So Admiral, Keeper, Carpenter-
Now should you put to sea
In such a flood, it would be good
If one of these you be,
But better still-all three!

-- James Reeves


Noé

Noé était un amiral,
Qui navigua sans précédent,
Quarante jours, quarante nuits,
Avec sa femme et ses enfants,
Sur le tout-puissant océan.

Sous son pont battu par les vents,
Cet amiral avait un zoo
Où tous les animaux du monde,
Kangourous, fourmis ou chevaux,
Il gardait deux par deux sur l'eau.

Dans la tempête et le tonnerre,
Il veillait sur chaque animal,
Chaque espèce, mâle et femelle,
Tapie tremblante en fond de cale,
Sentant tanguer l'arche vitale.

Or Noé en bon charpentier,
Avait fait son bateau si fort,
Que nul humain ou animal
Ne fut perdu par-dessus bord
Avant d'arriver à bon port.

Si vous deviez prendre la mer,
Amiral, gardien, charpentier,
Dans l'hypothèse d'un déluge,
Exercez l'un de ces métiers,
Ou mieux les trois si vous pouviez !

Traduction ©2005 Laurent Chiacchiérini


Haut de page

The Snail

At sunset, when the night-dews fall,
Out of the ivy on the wall
With horns outstretched and pointed tail
Comes the grey and noiseless snail.

On ivy stems she clambers down,
Carrying her house of brown.
Safe in the dark, no greedy eye
Can her tender body spy,

While she herself, a hungry thief,
Searches out the freshest leaf.
She travels on as best she can
Like a toppling caravan.

-- James Reeves


L'escargot

Avec la rosée de la nuit,
Sur le muret, sortant du lierre,
Cornes dressées, queue en arrière,
Sans bruit voici l'escargot gris.

Ainsi s'avance l'escargot,
Traînant sa maison sur son dos.
Bien à l'abri de l'extérieur,
Nul ne peut voir son intérieur.

Mangeur avide, il s'aventure,
A la recherche de verdure.
Prudemment il descend la pente,
Caravane brinquebalante.

Traduction ©2005 Laurent Chiacchiérini


Haut de page

Fire

Hard and black is my home,
Hard as a rock and black as night.
But scarlet and gold am I,
Delicate, warm and bright.

For long years I lie,
A prisoner in the dark,
But at last I break my fetters
In a rush of flame and spark.

First a tree and then a rock
Is the house where I sleep.
Let out, like a demon
I crackle and hiss and leap.

-- James Reeves


Le feu

Dur et noir paraît mon foyer,
Dur tel du roc, noir tel le jais.
Pourtant je suis d'or et de sang,
Voluptueux, chaud et brillant.

Des années entières je dors,
Prisonnier comme dans un fort.
Quand enfin je brise mes fers,
Je rejaillis dans un éclair.

Au sein d'un arbre ou sous la pierre,
Je couve sans en avoir l'air.
Puis je resurgis comme un diable,
Craquant, sifflant et formidable.

Traduction ©2005 Laurent Chiacchiérini


Haut de page

Cows

Half the time they munched the grass and all the time they lay
Down in the watermeadows, the lazy month of May,
A-chewing, A-moo-ing,
To pass the hours away.

"Nice weather", said the brown cow.
"Ah", said the white.
"Grass is very tasty."
"Grass is alright."

Half the time they munched the grass and all the time they lay
Down in the watermeadows, the lazy month of May,
A-chewing, A-moo-ing,
To pass the hours away.

"Rain coming," said the brown cow.
"Ah", said the white.
"Flies is very tiresome"
"Flies really bite."

Half the time they munched the grass and all the time they lay
Down in the watermeadows, the lazy month of May,
A-chewing, A-moo-ing,
To pass the hours away.

"Time to go," said the brown cow.
"Ah", said the white.
"Nice chat."
"Very pleasant."
"'Night."
"Nighty-night."

Half the time they munched the grass and all the time they lay
Down in the watermeadows, the lazy month of May,
A-chewing, A-moo-ing,
To pass the hours away.

-- James Reeves


Les vaches

L'une et l'autre ruminaient
Dans la prairie en ce doux mai.
Tantôt mâchant, tantôt meuglant,
S'efforçant de tuer le temps.

"Ce qu'il fait beau", dit la Noireaude.
"Ça, c'est ben vrai", dit la Blanchotte.
"L'herbe est fort bonne."
"Elle est exquise."

L'une et l'autre ruminaient
Dans la prairie en ce doux mai.
Tantôt mâchant, tantôt meuglant,
S'efforçant de tuer le temps.

"Voilà qu'il pleut", dit la Noireaude.
"Ça, c'est ben vrai", dit la Blanchotte.
"Les mouches piquent."
"C'est agaçant."

L'une et l'autre ruminaient
Dans la prairie en ce doux mai.
Tantôt mâchant, tantôt meuglant,
S'efforçant de tuer le temps.

"Il faut rentrer", dit la Noireaude.
"Ça, c'est ben vrai", dit la Blanchotte.
"C'était charmant."
"Un vrai plaisir."
"Bonne nuit."
"Dormez bien."

L'une et l'autre ruminaient
Dans la prairie en ce doux mai.
Tantôt mâchant, tantôt meuglant,
S'efforçant de tuer le temps.

Traduction ©2005 Laurent Chiacchiérini


Haut de page

The Sea

The sea is a hungry dog,
Giant and grey.
He rolls on the beach all day.
With his clashing teeth and shaggy jaws
Hour upon hour he gnaws
The rumbling, tumbling stones,
And 'Bones, bones, bones, bones!'
The giant sea-dog moans,
Licking his greasy paws.

And when the night wind roars
And the moon rocks in the stormy cloud,
He bounds to his feet and snuffs and sniffs,
Shaking his wet sides over the cliffs,
And howls and hollos long and loud.

But on quiet days of May or June,
When even the grasses on the dune
Play no more their reedy tune,
With his head between his paws
He lies on the sandy shores,
So quiet, so quiet, he scarcely snores.

-- James Reeves


La mer

La mer est un chien affamé,
Un géant gris qui sur la plage
Se roule toute la journée.
Claquant des crocs comme de rage,
Rongeant infatigablement
Les galets sonnants trébuchants.
"Que d'eau, que d'os, que d'eau, que d'os !",
Gémit le chien en se léchant
Les pattes graissées par les flots.

La nuit lorsque mugit le vent,
Dansent la lune et les nuages.
Bondissant, humant, reniflant,
S'ébrouant le long du rivage,
C'est un hurlement permanent.

Mais dès qu'arrive mai ou juin,
Même les oyats sur les dunes
Ne se font plus entendre au loin.
La tête entre ses pattes brunes,
Étendu sur le sable blanc,
À peine en sort un ronflement.

Traduction ©2005 Laurent Chiacchiérini


Haut de page

If Pigs Could Fly

If pigs could fly I'd fly a pig
To foreign countries small and big
To Italy and Spain
To Austria where cow bells ring
To Germany where people sing
And then come home again

I'd see the Ghangis and the Nile
I'd visit Madagascar's isle
And Persia and Peru
People would say they'd never seen
So odd so strange an air machine
As that on which I flew

Yes everyone would raise a shout
To see his trotters and his snout
Come floating from the sky.
And I would be a famous star
In all the countries near and far
If only pigs could fly

-- James Reeves


Si les cochons...

Si les cochons avaient des ailes
Je volerais à tire-d'aile
Vers quelque pays hors d'atteinte.
Vers l'Italie ou vers l'Espagne,
Vers l'Autriche où les vaches tintent
Ou encore vers l'Allemagne.

J'irais voir le Gange et le Nil,
Madagascar, cette belle île,
Et puis la Perse et le Pérou.
Sur terre oncques ne vit jamais
Un aéronef aussi fou
Que celui que j'enfourcherais.

Tous les gens lèveraient la tête
Vers l'animal doté d'un groin,
Aperçu traversant le ciel.
Je deviendrais une vedette
Qu'on verrait arriver de loin
Si les cochons avaient des ailes.

Traduction ©2005 Laurent Chiacchiérini


Haut de page

W

The King sent for his wise men all
To find a rhyme for W.
When they had thought a good long time,
But could not think of a single rhyme,
'I'm sorry,' said he, 'to trouble you.'

-- James Reeves


W

Le Roi fit quérir tous les savants de sa cour,
Cherchant une rime à la lettre W.
Lorsqu'ayant planché pendant des jours et des jours,
Les pauvres érudits d'idées furent à court,
Le Roi se dit navré du trouble soulevé.

Traduction ©2005 Laurent Chiacchiérini


Haut de page

 

Rough Weather

To share with you this rough, divisive weather
And not to grieve because we have to share it,
Desire to wear the dark of night together
And feel no colder that we do not wear it,
Because sometime my sight of you is clearer,
The memory not clouded by the sense,
To know that nothing now can make you dearer
Than does the close touch of intelligence,
To be the prisoner of your kindnesses
And tell myself I want you to be free,
To wish you here with me despite all this,
To wish you here, knowing you cannot be&emdash;
This is a way of love in our rough season,
This side of madness, the other side of reason.

-- James Reeves


Mauvais temps

Partager avec toi ce temps qui nous sépare
Sans se plaindre jamais car tel est notre lot.
Revêtir en pensée la nuit quand vient le soir
Et nous sentir au chaud même sans son manteau.
Car parfois je te vois beaucoup plus clairement,
Quand ton souvenir n'est pas troublé par mes sens,
Sachant que rien ne peut me rendre plus aimant
Que le contact étroit de nos intelligences.
Être le prisonnier de tes délicatesses
Et avoir pour seul souhait ta pleine liberté.
T'avoir à mes côtés, te côtoyer sans cesse,
Ce, contre tout espoir, malgré l'adversité.
C'est la voie de l'amour en la morte-saison,
D'un côté la passion, de l'autre la raison.

Traduction ©2005 Laurent Chiacchiérini


Haut de page

 

No fault of ours

No fault of yours; it is the enchanter time.
Your look of love that pierced me once
But found me blind and dumb.
No fault of yours, but the enchanter time
Transformed into a puff of smoke
Lost in the common air.

What fault was mine, that I should feel the stroke
Long after it has spent its force
And aimed no more at me?
No fault of ours, but the enchanter time
Conspired that you should love me then,
And I should love you now.

- James Reeves


Ce n'est pas notre faute

Non, ce n'est pas ta faute, c'est la faute du temps
Si ton regard d'amour, lorsqu'il m'a transpercé,
N'a pu me rencontrer qu'aveugle et bouche bée.
Non, ce n'est pas ta faute, mais la faute du temps
Si ton regard d'amour n'a pas eu plus d'effet
Que la plus mince des volutes de fumée.

Est-ce ma faute à moi si je ne le ressens
Que bien longtemps après qu'il se fut dissipé
Et qu'ailleurs que vers moi il se fut dirigé.
Ce n'est pas notre faute, mais la faute du temps
Qui fit en sorte que ce fût toi qui m'aimais,
Cependant que c'est moi qui t'aime désormais.

Traduction ©2005 Laurent Chiacchiérini


Haut de page

 

The Black Pebble

There went three children down to the shore,
Down to the shore and back;
There was skipping Susan and bright-eyed Sam
And little scowling Jack.

Susan found a white cockle shell,
The prettiest ever seen,
And Sam picked up a piece of glass,
Rounded and smooth and green.

But Jack found only a plain black pebble
That lay by the rolling sea,
And that was all that ever he found;
So back they went all three.

The cockle shell they put on the table,
The green glass on the shelf,
But the little black pebble that Jack had found,
He kept it for himself.

- James Reeves


Le galet noir

Trois bambins allaient se promenant sur la plage,
Parcourant le rivage.
Susanne sautillait, les yeux de Sam brillaient,
Jacques était renfrogné.

Susanne trouva un beau coquillage blanc,
Le plus beau des présents.
Sam ramassa un petit morceau de verre,
Arrondi, lisse et vert.

Jacques ne trouva lui qu'un simple galet noir,
Seul trésor qu'il put voir.
Après avoir bien tout exploré de leurs yeux,
Ils rentrèrent chez eux.

Le coquillage alla tout droit à la cuisine,
Le verre à la vitrine,
Mais le petit galet que Jacques découvrit,
Il le garda pour lui.

Traduction ©2005 Laurent Chiacchiérini


Haut de page

 

Chickamungus

All in the groves of dragon-fungus
Lives the mysterious Chickamungus.
The natives who inhabit there
Have never yet found out his lair;
And if by chance they did, no doubt
The Chickamungus would be out.
For he is seldom found at home;
He likes to rove, he likes to roam.
He never sleeps but what he snores,
He never barks but what he roars,
He never creeps but what he walks,
He never climbs but what he stalks,
He never trots but what he hobbles,
He never stands but what he wobbles,
He never runs but what he skims,
He never flies but what he swims,
At tom-tom time he romps and roves
Among the odorous dragon-groves.
He lives on half-grown formicoots
And other sorts of roots and shoots.
He has been seen at rest among
His multitudinivorous young;
And travellers returning late
Have heard him crying for his mate.
His tracks have been identified,
Straying a bit from side to side,
Across the desert plains of Quunce.
A native girl observed him once,
But could not say what she had seen,
So unobservant had she been.
Her evidence is inconclusive,
And so the beast remains elusive.
A naturalist who found his den
Was never after seen again.
Thus we must leave the Chickamungus
At large amidst the dragon-fungus.

- James Reeves


Le chicamagon

Au fin fond du bois du dragon
Se cache le Chicamagon.
Jamais les habitants du crû
Son antre découvrir n'ont pu.
Quand bien même ils le trouveraient,
Nul Chicamagon n'y verraient :
Il est rarement au foyer,
Aime à rôder et marauder.
Jamais ne dort mais comme il ronfle !
Jamais n'aboie mais comme il gronde !
Jamais ne rampe mais vagabonde !
Jamais ne grimpe mais comme il gonfle !
Jamais ne mange mais comme il ronge !
Jamais ne rêve mais comme il pionce !
Jamais ne court mais comme il fonce !
Jamais ne vole mais comme il plonge !
Souvent il s'ébat sans façon
Dans l'odorant bois du dragon.
Il se nourrit de vertes gousses,
De racines et d'autres pousses.
On l'a surpris dans la nature
Veillant sur sa progéniture.
Des voyageurs rentrant la nuit
Ont entendu son mâle cri.
Ses pas quelquefois se repèrent,
Errant à travers le désert,
Allant quelque peu de guingois.
Une enfant l'a vu une fois
Sans en donner la description
Tant elle a manqué d'attention.
Son témoignage étant peu fiable,
La bête reste insaisissable.
Un naturaliste aurait vu
Sa tanière et puis disparu.
Laissons donc le Chicamagon
Au fin fond du bois du dragon.

Traduction ©2005 Laurent Chiacchiérini


Haut de page

 

A Pig Tale

Poor Jane Higgins,
She had five piggins,
And one got drowned in the Irish sea.

Poor Jane Higgins,
She had four piggins,
And one flew over a sycamore tree.

Poor Jane Higgins,
She had three piggins,
And one was taken away for pork.

Poor Jane Higgins,
She had two piggins,
And one was taken to the Bishops for cork.

Poor Jane Higgins,
She had one piggin,
And that was struck by a shower of hail.

So poor Jane Higgins,
She had no piggins.

- James Reeves


Cochonnade

Pauvre Jeanne Cauchon :
Elle avait cinq cochons ;
L'un se noya en mer du Nord.

Pauvre Jeanne Cauchon :
Elle avait quat'cochons ;
L'un tomba sur un sycomore.

Pauvre Jeanne Cauchon :
Elle avait trois cochons ;
L'un finit en salé de porc.

Pauvre Jeanne Cauchon :
Elle avait deux cochons ;
L'un se vit emmené au port.

Pauvre Jeanne Cauchon :
Elle avait un cochon ;
Il fut frappé de grêle à mort.

Pauvre Jeanne Cauchon :
Elle a zéro cochon !

Traduction ©2005 Laurent Chiacchiérini


Haut de page

 

Stones by the Sea

Smooth and flat, grey, brown and white,
Winter and summer, noon and night,
Tumbling together for a thousand ages,
We ought to be wiser than Eastern sages.
But no doubt we stones are foolish as most,
So we don't say much on our stretch of coast.
Quiet and peaceful we mainly sit,
And when storms come up we grumble a bit

- James Reeves


Les galets

Polis et aplatis, noirs, marrons, blancs ou gris,
Été comme hiver, à midi comme à minuit,
Depuis la nuit des temps roulant sur le rivage,
Nous devrions être plus sages que des mages.
Or nous autres galets sommes comme des bêtes ;
Nous restons sans mot dire allongés sur la plage,
Calmes et silencieux parmi le paysage,
À peine grommelant lorsque vient la tempête.

Traduction ©2005 Laurent Chiacchiérini


Haut de page

 

Spells

I dance and dance without any feet-
This is the spell of the ripening wheat.

With never a tongue I've a tale to tell-
This is the meadow-grasses' spell.

I give you health without any fee-
This is the spell of the apple-tree.

I rhyme and riddle without any book-
This is the spell of the bubbling brook.

Without any legs I run for ever-
This is the spell of the mighty river.

I fall for ever and not at all-
This is the spell of the waterfall.

Without a voice I roar aloud-
This is the spell of the thunder-cloud.

No button or seam has my white coat-
This is the spell of the leaping goat.

I can cheat strangers with never a word-
This is the spell of a cuckoo-bird.

We have tongues in plenty but speak no names-
This is the spell of the fiery flames.

The creaking door has a spell to riddle-
I play a tune without any fiddle.

- James Reeves


Magies

Je danse danse bien que je n'aie pas de pieds :
C'est la magie dorée du jeune épi de blé.

Je parle et chante bien que je n'aie pas de langue :
C'est la magie portée par l'herbe sur la lande.

J'apporte la santé sans me faire payer :
C'est la magie sucrée du doux fruit du pommier.

Je n'ai point d'instrument accompagnant mon chant :
C'est la magie rythmée du torrent bouillonnant.

Je cours depuis des siècles or je n'ai pas de jambes :
C'est la magie bleutée de la rivière ingambe.

Je tombe sans arrêt mais je me dresse haut :
C'est la magie moirée de la cascade d'eau.

Point n'est besoin de voix pour faire hurler ma rage :
C'est la magie zébrée du nuage d'orage.

Nuls boutons ni ourlets n'ornent mon manteau blanc :
C'est la magie lactée du chevreau bondissant.

Je trompe mon monde sans en dire beaucoup :
C'est la magie rusée de l'oiseau dit coucou.

Mes langues sont variées mais je ne pipe mot :
C'est la magie ignée du feu du brasero.

Un grincement de porte est tout aussi magique :
C'est un air joué sans instrument de musique.

Traduction ©2005 Laurent Chiacchiérini


 

Haut de page

 

The field of lies

But it was death he looked for in the field of lies,
Naming it love.
His thoughts reached down
Below the roots of the convolvulus.

Now, I suppose, the nettles breed and wave
Over his cenotaph, the bank they lay on.
A child that blows a dandelion-head
Knows more of time
Than any lovers murmuring "For ever".

Every seed entombs a shattered flower,
In every word a lie:
There is the truth of it.
The dew is cold,
And the moon quits the sky she does not love,
There is no metaphor for her indifference.

- James Reeves


Le champ du mensonge

C'est la mort qu'il cherchait dans le champ du mensonge
En lui donnant l'amour pour nom.
Au plus profond allaient ses songes
Sous les racines du liseron.

Je suppose qu'aujourd'hui ce sont les orties
Qui sur son cénotaphe croissent et se multiplient.
L'enfant qui souffle un pissenlit
En sait plus du temps infini
Que ces amants jurant qu'ils s'aiment à jamais.

Chaque graine renferme une fleur fracassée,
Chaque mot recèle une contrevérité,
C'est là la triste vérité.
La rosée est glacée,
La lune quitte un ciel qui perd sa préférence ;
Il n'est de métaphore à son indifférence.

Traduction ©2005 Laurent Chiacchiérini


Haut de page

 

Grim and Gloomy

Oh, grim and gloomy,
So grim and gloomy
Are the caves beneath the sea.
Oh, rare but roomy
And bare and boomy,
Those salt sea caverns be.

Oh, slim and slimy
Or grey and grimy
Are the animals of the sea.
Salt and oozy
And safe and snoozy
The caves where those animals be.

Hark to the shuffling,
Huge and snuffling,
Ravenous, cavernous, great sea-beasts!
But fair and fabulous,
Tintinnabulous,
Gay and fabulous are their feasts.

Ah, but the queen of the sea,
The querulous, perilous sea!
How the curls of her tresses
The pearls on her dresses,
Sway and swirl in the waves,
How cosy and dozy,
How sweet ring-a-rosy
Her bower in the deep-sea caves!

Oh, rare but roomy
And bare and boomy
Those caverns under the sea,
And grave and grandiose,
Safe and sandiose
The dens of her denizens be.

- James Reeves


Sinistres et sombres

Sinistres et sombres,
Saturées d'ombre,
Ces grottes sous-marines.
Monumentales
Cathédrales,
Ces cavernes salines.

Grasses et gluantes,
Grises et glissantes,
Ces bêtes sous-marines.
Sales et suintantes,
Mais envoûtantes,
Ces grottes où elles dînent.

Les ronflements,
Reniflements,
De ces monstres marins
N'ont pas d'égal
Sauf le régal
De leurs joyeux festins.

Voici la reine de la mer,
La mer menaçante et amère.
Les boucles de sa chevelure,
Les perles ornant sa parure,
Tournoyant et tourbillonnant,
Oscillant tout en ondoyant,
Dansant une ronde enfantine
Au fond des fosses sous-marines.

Monumentales
Cathédrales,
Ces salles abyssales.
Graves et grandioses,
Sûres et sableuses,
Pour leurs peuplades animales.

Traduction ©2005 Laurent Chiacchiérini


Haut de page

 

The Hippocrump

Along the valleys of the Ump
gallops the fearful Hippocrump.
His hide is leathery and thick;
His eyelids open with a click!
His mouth he closes with a clack!
He has three humps upon his back;
On each of these there grows a score
Of horny spikes, and sometimes more.
His hair is curly, thick and brown;
Beneath his chin a beard hangs down.
He has eight feet with hideous claws;
His neck is long &endash; and O his jaws!
The boldest falters in his track
To hear those hundred teeth go clack!
The Hippocrump is fierce indeed,
But if he eats the baneful weed
That grows beside the Purple lake,
His hundred teeth begin to ache.
Then how the creature stamps and roars
Along the Ump's resounding shores!
The drowsy cattle faint with fright;
The birds fall flat, the fish turn white.
Even the rocks begin to shake;
The children in their beds awake;
The old ones quiver, quail and quake.
"Alas!" they cry. "make no mistake,
It is HIMSELF &endash; he's got the ache
From eating by the Purple Lake!"
Some say, "It is Old You-Know who,
He's in a rage: what shall we do?
Lock up the barns, protect the stores,
Bring all the pigs and sheep indoors!"
They call upon their God, Agw-ump
To save them from the Hippocrump.
What's that I hear go hop-skip-jump?
He's coming! Stand aside there! BUMP!
LUMP-LUMP! &endash; "He's on the bridge now!
LUMP! &endash; "I hear his tail" &endash;
Ker-flump, Ker-flump!
"I see the prickles on his hump" &endash;
It is, it IS &endash; the Hippocrump!
Defend us now, O great Agw-ump"

Thus prayed the dwellers by the Ump
Their prayer was heard. A broken stomp
Caught the intruder on the rump.
He slipped into the foaming river,
Whose icy water quenched his fever,
Then while the creature floundering lay,
The timid people ran away.
And when the morrow dawned serene
The hippocrump was no more seen.
Glad hymns of joy the people raised
"For ever Great Agw-ump be praised"

- James Reeves


L'Hippocrampe

Dans la vallée de la Garampe
Sévit le terrible Hippocrampe.
Sa peau est luisante et épaisse,
Ses yeux font clic ! quand il les baisse,
Sa gueule clac ! quand il la clôt.
Il a trois bosses sur le dos ;
Chacune est hérissée d'épines,
Beaucoup plus que l'on ne devine.
Son poil est dru, bouclé, marron ;
La barbe lui pend au menton.
Il a huit pieds tels des hachoirs,
Son cou est long, et ses mâchoires !
Le plus hardi tremble en dedans,
En l'entendant claquer des dents.
L'Hippocrampe est des plus féroces,
Mais s'il mange l'algue morose
Qui pousse au bord du grand Lac Rose,
Ses dents lui font un mal atroce.
Il hurle comme atteint de crampes
Dans les gorges de la Garampe.
Le bétail assoupi frémit ;
Oiseau, poisson, chacun blêmit.
La falaise elle-même en tremble ;
Les enfants s'éveillent ensemble ;
Les anciens pleurent de terreur :
"Malédiction !" Car, pas d'erreur,
Oui, c'est bien LUI, qui a tant mal
D'avoir mangé l'algue fatale.
D'aucuns crient : "C'est qui vous savez ;
Il est en rage : où nous sauver ?
Rentrez les troupeaux alentour !
Enfermez-vous à double tour !"
Ils prient leur Dieu, ô Jupitrempe,
De les sauver de l'Hippocrampe.
L'entendez-vous qui saute et rampe ?
Le voici ! Il faut qu'on décampe !
"Le voilà déjà sur le pont !
J'entends sa queue qui fait des bonds !"
Rapataclampe, rapataclampe !
"Je vois les piquants sur ses tempes !
Mais oui, MAIS OUI, c'est l'Hippocrampe !
Protège-nous, ô Jupitrempe !"

Ainsi les gens se lamentèrent
Et entendue fut leur prière.
L'intrus glissa, pris par derrière,
Dans l'écume de la rivière
Dont les eaux glacées avalèrent
Le torrent fou de sa colère.
La foule épouvantée s'enfuit
Et quand enfin l'aube poignit
Calme et sereine l'on ne vit
Nulle trace de l'Hippocrampe.
"Gloire et puissance à Jupitrempe !"

Traduction ©2005 Laurent Chiacchiérini


Haut de page

The Double Autumn

Better to close the book and say good-night
When nothing moves you much but your own plight.
Neither the owl's noise through the dying grove
Where the small creatures insecurely move
Nor what the moon does to the huddled trees,
Nor the admission that such things as these
Would have excited once can now excite.
Better close down the double autumn night
Than practise dumbly staring at your plight.

- James Reeves


Le double automne

Mieux vaut tourner la page et se dire au revoir
Quand rien ne nous émeut que notre désespoir.
Ni le cri de la chouette au fond de la forêt
Où les petits rongeurs se pressent apeurés,
Ni le halo de lune autour d'un bouquet d'arbres,
Toute chose aujourd'hui qui me laisse de marbre,
Quand bien même autrefois elle me rendait aphone.
Mieux vaut mettre un terme à la double nuit d'automne
Que de se contempler d'un regard monotone.

Traduction ©2005 Laurent Chiacchiérini


Haut de page

Aeons Hence

When aeons hence, they rediscover
The unregarded island I inhabit,
Will they not marvel
How life upon so bare a soil withstood
This testy climate and abrasive sea?

And when by excavation
My relics are exposed, my habits known,
How, perching on a ledge out of the wind,
I scraped a living, will they not admit
They've lost the secret of some things I did,
As making good pots from this gritty clay
And music from a certain kind of shells?

- James Reeves


D'ici des lustres

D'ici des lustres quand l'on redécouvrira
Cette île inaperçue qui me sert de demeure,
J'imagine comment l'on s'émerveillera
Que la vie ait tenu sur cette terre nue,
Face au climat hostile et aux flots ravageurs.

Lorsque l'on fouillera, que l'on étudiera,
Mes restes mis à nu, mes coutumes connues,
Comment je survivais, dressé dans le blizzard,
Telles sont les questions que l'on se posera
Quand se sera perdu le secret de mes arts,
L'art de la poterie avec un peu d'argile,
Celui de la musique au moyen de fossiles.

Traduction ©2005 Laurent Chiacchiérini


Haut de page

 

The Wandering Moon

Age after age and all alone,
 She turns through endless space,
Showing the watchers on the earth
 Her round and rocky face.
Enchantment comes upon all hearts
 That feel her lonely grace.

Mount Newton is the highest peak
 Upon the wandering moon,
And there perhaps the witches dance
 To some fantastic tune,
And in the half-light cold and grey
 Their incantations croon.

And there perhaps mad creatures come
 To play at hide-and-seek
With howling apes and blundering bears
 And bats that swoop and squeak.
I cannot see the nameless things
 Go on at Newton Peak.

I cannot tell what vessels move
 Across the Nubian Sea,
Nor whether any bird alrights
 On any stony tree.
A quarter of a million miles
 Divide the moon and me.

A quarter of a million miles-
 It is a fearsome way,
But ah! if we could only fly
 On some auspicious day
And land at last on Newton Peak,
 Ah then, what games we'd play!

What songs we'd sing on Newton Peak,
 On what wild journeys go
By frozen fen or burning waste,
 Or where the moon-flowers grow,
And countless strange and fearful things-
 If only we could know!

- James Reeves


La lune vagabonde

Depuis la nuit des temps, la lune vagabonde
 À travers l'espace infini.
Elle enchante les habitants de ce bas monde
 Par sa bouille ronde qui luit.
Sa grâce solitaire de bonheur inonde
 Le cœur de chacun dans la nuit.

Le mont nommé Newton est la plus haute cime
 Sur cette lune vagabonde,
Là où peut-être des sorcières cacochymes
 Dansent leur ronde furibonde
Et où dans la froideur d'une lumière intime
 Leurs folles incantations grondent.

Et là peut-être que de drôles d'animaux
 Viennent jouer à cache-cache
Avec des singes hurleurs et des ours patauds,
 Et des chauves-souris qui crachent.
Impossible de voir ce qui s'ourdit là-haut
 Sans que personne ne le sache.

Impossible de voir même avec de bons yeux
 Quel vaisseau croise en mer Nubienne
Ni si quelque oiseau lune est perché au milieu
 De quelque forêt indigène.
Il faut compter au moins quatre-vingt mille lieues
 Entre nous et l'astre sélène.

Quatre-vingt mille lieues d'espace désolé,
 C'est un chemin considérable,
Mais si seulement nous pouvions nous envoler
 Par une journée favorable
Pour aller nous poser sur le plus haut sommet ;
 Nous aurions des jeux formidables !

Comme nous chanterions sur ce point culminant ;
 Quels voyages fous nous ferions
Dans les marais glacés ou les déserts brûlants ;
 Des fleurs lunaires nous verrions
Et quantité d'objets tous très impressionnants.
 Ah, si seulement nous savions !

Traduction ©2006 Laurent Chiacchiérini


Mr. Tom Narrow

A scandalous man
Was Mr. Tom Narrow,
He pushed his grandmother
Round in a barrow.
And he called out loud
As he rang his bell,
"Grannies to sell!
Old Grannies to sell!"

The neighbours said,
As he passed them by,
"This poor old lady
We will not buy.
He surely must be
A mischievious man
To try for to sell
His dear old Gran"

"Besides," said another,
"If you ask me,
She'd be very small use
That I can see".
"You're right", said a third,
"And no mistake -
A very poor bargain
She'd surely make"

So Mr. Tom Narrow
He scratched his head,
And he sent his grandmother
Back to bed;
And he rang his bell
Through all the town
Till he sold his barrow
For half a crown.

- James Reeves


Monsieur Silhouette

Ah, mais quelle affaire !
Monsieur Silhouette
Poussait sa grand-mère
Dans une brouette,
Sonnant sa clochette,
Hurlant à tue-tête :
"Je vends cette chouette
À qui me l'achète !"

Les voisins regardent
Passer l'équipage :
"La pauvre vieillarde,
Vendue à son âge !
Il faut être un bien
Satané vaurien
Pour mettre aux enchères
Sa vieille grand-mère."

"Et puis", dit quelqu'un,
"Connaissant son âge,
Je ne vois pas bien
Quel en est l'usage."
"Oui", fait un troisième.
"C'est là le problème :
Bien mauvaise affaire
Que cette grand-mère !"

Monsieur Silhouette,
Se grattant la tête,
Laisse sa mamie
Retourner au lit
Et part dare-dare,
Avec sa clochette,
Vendre sa brouette
Pour un demi-liard.

Traduction ©2006 Laurent Chiacchiérini


Haut de page

The Bogus-Boo

The Bogus-boo
Is a creature who
Comes out a night-- and why?
He likes the air;
He likes to scare
The nervous passer-by.

Out from the park
At dead of dark
He comes with huffling pad.
If, when alone,
You hear his moan,
Tis like to drive you mad.

He has two wings,
Pathetic things,
With which he cannot fly.
His tusks look fierce,
Yet could not pierce
The merest butterfly.

He has six ears,
But what he hears
Is very faint and small;
And with the claws
On his eight paws
He cannot scratch at all.

He looks so wise
With his owl-eyes,
His aspect grim and ghoulish;
But truth to tell,
He sees not well
And is distinctly foolish.

This Bogus-boo,
What can he do
But huffle in the dark?
So don't take fright;
He has no bite
And very little bark.

- James Reeves


Le pseudo-bouh

Le pseudo-bouh
Tel un hibou
Ne paraît que la nuit,
Aime à crier
Et effrayer
Le passant qui s'enfuit.

Sortant du noir,
Quand vient le soir,
Il surgit tout à coup.
Quand dans la nuit
Jaillit son cri,
Il peut vous rendre fou.

Il a deux ailes
Qui, bien trop frêles,
L'empêchent de voler.
Ses crocs féroces
N'ont pas la force
De percer le papier.

Ses six oreilles
Sont sans pareilles
Pour n'entendre aucun bruit.
De ses huit serres,
Il ne lacère
Que l'air autour de lui.

Yeux grands ouverts,
Il a tout l'air
D'une sinistre chouette.
Mais, pas de doute,
Il n'y voit goutte
Et n'a rien dans la tête.

Ce pseudo-bouh
De rien du tout
Ne fait rien que du foin.
Ne craigniez rien,
Il ne mord point
Et n'aboie que de loin.

Traduction ©2006 Laurent Chiacchiérini


Haut de page

The Two Old Women of Mumbling Hill

The two old trees on Mumbling Hill,
They whisper and chatter and never keep still.
What do they say as they lean together
In rain or sunshine or windy weather?

There were two women lied near the hill,
And they used to gossip as women will
Of friends and neighbours, houses and shops,
Weather and trouble and clothes and crops.

And one sad winter they both took ill,
The two old women of Mumbling Hill.
They were bent and feeble and wasted away.
And both of them died on the self-same day.

Now the ghosts of the women of Mumbling Hill,
They started to call out loud and shrill,
"Where are the tales we used to tell,
And where is the talking we loved so well?"

Side by side stood ghosts until
They both took root in Mumbling Hill;
And they turned to trees, and they slowly grew,
Summer and winter the long years through.

In the winter the bare boughs creaked and cried,
In summer the green leaves whispered and sighed,
And still they talk of fire and rain,
Storm and sunshine, comfort and pain.

The two old trees on Mumbling Hill,
They whisper and chatter and never keep still.
What do they say as they lean together
In rain or sunshine or windy weather?

- James Reeves


Les deux vieilles sur la colline

Deux vieux arbres sur la colline
Marmonnent et baragouinent,
Tout le temps courbés en avant
Sous la pluie, le soleil, le vent.

Il était deux bonnes copines
Qui papotaient entre voisines
De leurs amis, de leur maison,
De leurs chiffons, de la saison.

Elles furent prises d'angine
Et moururent de la poitrine.
Toutes deux furent emportées
Au cours de la même journée.

Leurs fantômes sur la colline
Se mirent à crier famine :
"Où donc sont nos conversations,
La passion de nos discussions ?"

Les fantômes sur la colline
Finirent par prendre racine.
Dès lors lentement ils poussèrent,
Grandissant été comme hiver.

L'hiver leurs branches nues craquaient
L'été leurs feuilles murmuraient.
Tous deux devisaient comme antan,
Qui de la pluie, qui du beau temps.

Deux vieux arbres sur la colline,
Marmonnent et baragouinent,
Tout le temps courbés en avant
Sous la pluie, le soleil, le vent.

Traduction ©2006 Laurent Chiacchiérini


Haut de page

Giant Thunder

Giant Thunder, striding home,
Wonders if his supper's done.

"Hag wife, hag wife, bring me bones!"
"They are not done," the old hag moans.

"Not done? Not?" the giant roars,
And heaves the old wife out of doors.

Cries he "I'll have them, cooked or not!"
And overturns the cooking pot.

He flings the burning coals about;
See how the lightning flashes out!

Upon the gale the old hag rides,
The clouded moon for terror hides.

All the world with thunder quakes;
Forest shudders, mountain shakes;
From the cloud the rainstorm breaks;
Village ponds are turned to lakes;
Every living creature wakes.

Hungry giant, lie you still!
Stamp no more from hill to hill -
Tomorrow you shall have your fill.

- James Reeves


Géant Tonnerre

Le grand Géant Tonnerre arrive en sa maison,
En se demandant ce qu'il va manger de bon.

"Allez femme, allez femme, apporte-moi mes os !"
"Mais ils ne sont pas cuits", gémit la vieille peau.

"Quoi ! Pas cuits ?" rugit le géant,
Boutant sa femme hors de céans.

Renversant le chaudron :
"J'en aurai, cuits ou non !"

Il fait voler les braises,
Éclairant la falaise.

La vieille enfourche une risée,
La lune fuit, terrorisée.

Un grondement sourd fait vibrer
Les montagnes et les forêts.
Soudain l'orage claque,
L'étang se change en lac,
Tout le monde a le trac.

Géant, arrête donc ta danse !
Va te coucher dans le silence ;
Demain tu auras ta pitance.

Traduction ©2006 Laurent Chiacchiérini


Haut de page

Little Fan

"I don't like the look of little Fan, mother,
I don't like her looks a little bit.
Her face-well, it's not exactly different,
But there's something wrong with it.

"She went down to the sea-shore yesterday,
And she talked to somebody there,
Now she won't do anything but sit
And comb out her yellowy hair.

"Her eyes are shiny and she sings, mother,
Like nobody ever sang before.
Perhaps they gave her something queer to eat,
Down by the rocks on the shore.

"Speak to me, speak, little Fan dear,
Aren't you feeling very well?
Where have you been and what are you singing,
And what's that seaweedy smell?

"Where did you get that shiny comb, love,
And those pretty coral beads so red?
Yesterday you had two legs, I'm certain,
But now there's something else instead.

"I don't like the looks of little Fan, mother,
You'd best go and close the door.
Watch now, or she'll be gone for ever
To the rocks by the brown sandy shore."

- James Reeves


Petite sœur

"Je n'aime pas l'air de petite sœur, maman,
Je n'aime pas l'air qu'elle affiche maintenant.
Son visage n'a pas l'air vraiment différent
Mais il y a quelque chose qui cloche dedans."

"Je l'ai vue descendre jusqu'à la plage hier
Et parler à quelqu'un sur le bord de la mer.
Aujourd'hui elle reste assise sans rien faire
Que peigner ses cheveux à la couleur d'éclair."

"Elle a l'œil brillant et elle chante, maman,
Comme jamais personne n'a chanté avant.
Peut-être lui a-t-on donné quelque aliment
Qui la fait se comporter si bizarrement. "

"Parle-moi, réponds-moi, chère petite sœur,
Quelle est donc la raison de ta brusque pâleur ?
Que t'est-il arrivé, que chantes-tu, ma sœur,
Et pourquoi donc des algues as-tu pris l'odeur ?"

"D'où te viennent, dis-moi, ton peigne éblouissant,
Ton collier de corail d'un beau rouge éclatant ?
Hier tu avais deux jambes assurément
Mais voici qu'elles ne sont plus là à présent."

"Je n'aime pas l'air de petite sœur, ma mère ;
Il vaudrait mieux fermer la porte à double tour
Sous peine de la voir disparaître un beau jour
Derrière les rochers sur le bord de la mer."

Traduction ©2006 Laurent Chiacchiérini


Haut de page

 

Rabbit and Lark

"Under the ground
It's rumbling and dark
And interesting,"
Said Rabbit to Lark.

Said Lark to Rabbit
"Up in the sky
There's plenty of room
And it's airy and high. "

"Under the ground
It's warm and dry
Won't you live with me?"
Was Rabbit's reply.

"There's air so sunny
I wish you'd agree, "
Said the little Lark,
"To live with me."

But under the ground
And up in the sky,
Larks can't burrow
Nor rabbits fly.

So skylark over
And rabbit under
They had to settle
To live asunder.

And often these two friends
Meet with a will
For a chat together
On top of the hill.

- James Reeves


Le lapin et l'alouette

"Sous la terre, dès que l'on fouille,
Cela grouille et cela gargouille ;
Il y fait noir, l'ambiance est chouette,"
Dit le lapin à l'alouette.

L'alouette dit au lapin :
"Dans les airs tu pourras trouver
De l'espace jusqu'à plus faim ;
Tout est léger et élevé."

"Sous la terre il ne fait pas froid ;
Il y fait bon, l'on y est bien.
Ne veux-tu pas vivre avec moi ?"
Fut la réponse du lapin.

"L'air est ensoleillé là-haut,"
Lui rétorqua alors l'oiseau.
"Pourquoi donc ne serait-ce pas
Toi qui viendrais vivre avec moi ?"

Mais dans la terre sous nos pieds
Tout comme là-haut dans le ciel,
Pour l'alouette aucun terrier,
Pas plus que les lapins n'ont d'ailes.

Donc l'alouette dans les airs
Comme le lapin sous la terre
Durent se résoudre vraiment
À demeurer séparément.

Et bien souvent les deux compères
Vont se retrouver volontiers
Pour bavarder autour d'un ver
Sur la colline aux peupliers.

Traduction ©2006 Laurent Chiacchiérini


Haut de page

 

The storm Behind the Hill

There is always the storm behind the hill
You must appease with insincere oblations,
But smile at the forced smile required of you,
The tawdry presents and congratulations.
This is the price of an unclouded sky
The guarantee of peace upon the hill:
Not to despise the petulant deities
Who haven't grown up yet and never will.

- James Reeves


L'orage derrière la colline

Quand l'orage derrière la colline gronde,
Il faut l'apaiser par d'hypocrites offrandes,
Se forcer à sourire de toutes ses dents
Ainsi qu'à prononcer de pseudo-compliments.
C'est le prix à payer pour un ciel sans nuage,
Pour préserver la paix de ce doux paysage :
Vénérer les irascibles divinités
Qui n'ont pas grandi et ne grandiront jamais.

Traduction ©2006 Laurent Chiacchiérini


Haut de page

 

Mrs Utter

Poor Mrs Utter
She eats no butter
But gristly meat and horrible pies
With a mug of sour ale
And a loaf that is stale
And a withered brown fish with buttony eyes!

In a black tattered skirt
She kneels in the dirt
And clatters her dustpan and brush on the stairs,
But everything's dusty,
And musty and rusty,
For the pump-handle's broken, the broom has no hairs.

The roof-top is leaky,
The windows-frames squeaky,
And out of the chimney the fledgelings fly.
Beside the bare grate
Lies old scraggy Kate,
A cat with one ear and one emerald eye.

Poor Mrs Utter
Would mumble and mutter,
"Ah! this is no life for a Princess of Spain.
I once had fine fare
And silk clothes to wear.
Ah me, shall I ever be rich again?"

- James Reeves


Madame Labeur

Pauvre mère Labeur
Pour elle point de beurre
Mais de la viande dure et des tourteaux plâtreux,
Un peu de pain rassis,
D'aigre vin de pays
Et du poisson pas frais aux troubles yeux vitreux.

De noir enguenillée,
Elle est agenouillée,
Balayette à la main dans un escalier sale.
Mais tout sent la poussière,
La rouille et la misère,
Car la pompe est cassée et le balai sans poils.

La pluie goutte du toit,
La porte est de guingois
Et dans la cheminée des oisillons maraudent.
Sur l'âtre dort Agathe,
La famélique chatte,
Qui n'a plus qu'une oreille et un œil émeraude.

Pauvre mère Labeur,
Elle retient ses pleurs :
"Ce n'est pas une vie pour l'Infante d'Autriche.
Moi qui menais grand train,
Me vêtais de satin.
Pauvre de moi, serai-je un jour à nouveau riche ?"

Traduction ©2006 Laurent Chiacchiérini


Haut de page

 

Beech Leaves

In autumn down the beechwood path
The leaves lie thick upon the ground.
It's there I love to kick my way
And hear the crisp and crashing sound.

I am a giant, and my steps
Echo and thunder to the sky.
How small the creatures of the woods
Must quake and cower as I pass by!

This brave and merry noise I make
In summer also when I stride
Down to the shining, pebbly sea
And kick the frothing waves aside.

- James Reeves


Sous la hêtraie

À l'automne sous la hêtraie
Souvent je vais m'aventurer.
Les feuilles crissent sous mes pieds
Arpentant leur tapis épais.

Tel un géant, mes pas résonnent ;
L'on croirait que l'orage tonne.
Les créatures du sous-bois
Vont se tapir pleines d'émoi.

Le même vacarme joyeux
Retentit l'été sur la plage
Quand je longe l'océan bleu
Foulant l'écume du rivage.

Traduction ©2006 Laurent Chiacchiérini


Haut de page

The Moonlit Stream

A stream far off beneath the moon
Flowed silver-bright and thin,
Winding its way like some slow tune
Played on a violin.

The valley trees were hushed and still;
The sky was pearly grey;
The moonlight slept upon the hill
As white as snow it lay.

Then softly from a ruined tower
That rose beside the stream
A bell chimed out the midnight hour;
And then - Oh, did I dream? -

Then all at once a long, black boat
With neither sail nor oars
Down that bright stream began to float
Between its shadowy shores.

No passenger nor steersman stirred
On that enchanting thing;
But faint, unearthly-sweet, I heard
A choir of voices sing.

It moved mysterious and serene,
A sable-feathered swan;
It seemed the soul of some sad queen
Was borne to Avalon.

So in my thoughts that shadowy boat
Will sail the moonlit river,
And faintly, I shall hear the note
Of that sad choir for ever.

- James Reeves


Au clair de lune

Au clair de lune un ru distant
Vagabonde au creux d'un vallon.
Son fil d'argent va serpentant
Tel un air lent sur un violon.

Les arbres bruissent en sourdine ;
Le ciel arbore un gris nacré.
La lune dort sur la colline
Nappée d'une blancheur de lait.

Des ruines d'un donjon détruit
Qui au bord du ruisseau s'élève,
Un carillon sonne minuit ;
Mais ne serait-ce alors qu'un rêve ?

Or voici qu'un long esquif noir
Dépourvu de voile et de rames
À la surface du miroir
S'avance comme dans un drame.

Ni pilote ni passager
Sur cette nef enchanteresse
D'où l'on entend se propager
Le chant sourd d'un chœur de prêtresses.

Barque mystérieuse et sereine,
Cygne noir semblant transporter
L'âme de quelque triste reine
Vers sa légendaire cité.

La vue de cette barque sombre
Voguant par la lune éclairée
Et les voix de ce chœur dans l'ombre
Vivront dans mon cœur à jamais.

Traduction ©2006 Laurent Chiacchiérini


Haut de page

 

Twenty-six letters

Twenty-six cards in half a pack;
Twenty-six weeks in half a year;
Twenty-six letters dressed in black
In all the words you ever will hear.

In 'King', 'Queen', 'Ace', and 'Jack'
In 'London', 'lucky', 'lone', and 'lack'
'January', 'April', 'fortify', 'fix',
You'll never find more than twenty-six.

Think of the beautiful things you see
On mountain, riverside, meadow and tree.
How many their names are, but how small
The twenty-six letters that spell them all.

- James Reeves


Vingt-six lettres

Vingt-six cartes forment la moitié d'un paquet ;
Vingt-six semaines font la moitié d'une année ;
Vingt-six lettres forment un complet alphabet
Composant tous les mots que vous lirez jamais.

Pour un "roi", une "reine", un "as" ou un "valet",
Un "mois", une "semaine " ou bien toute une "année",
Tout de noir habillées, noir comme le cassis,
Vous n'en rencontrerez jamais plus de vingt-six.

Pensez quand vous voyez toutes ces belles choses
Sur les monts, dans les vaux, sur les prés, dans les cieux,
Que leurs noms sont nombreux, beaucoup plus nombreux que
Les seules vingt-six lettres qui tous les composent.

Traduction ©2006 Laurent Chiacchiérini


Haut de page

The Nimp

Behold the supercilious Nimp,
The most select of creatures,
He has two flippers, long and limp,
Snub nose, and other features.

If bird or beast approach too near,
He looks at it with hauteur,
Then shambles sadly to the mere
And dives into the water

But if the fishes swim too close,
With air serene and bland
And blowing proudly through his nose
He paddles back to land.

- James Reeves


Le dédaignoir

Voici le hautain dédaignoir,
C'est la plus snob des créatures :
Un nez troussé, deux grands battoirs,
Entre autres dons de la nature.

Dès que s'approche un animal,
Il le regarde de très haut,
Puis, se traînant tant bien que mal,
Il s'en va se plonger dans l'eau.

Si les poissons nagent trop près,
Il prend un air indifférent.
Soufflant fièrement dans son nez,
Il rejoint le bord sur-le-champ.

Traduction ©2006 Laurent Chiacchiérini


Haut de page

The Doze

Through Dangly Woods the aimless Doze
A-dripping and a-dribbling goes.
His company no beast enjoys.
He makes a sort of hopeless noise
Between a snuffle and a snort.
His hair is neither long nor short;
His tail gets caught on briars and bushes,
As through the undergrowth he pushes.
His ears are big, but not much use.
He lives on blackberries and juice
And anything that he can get.
His feet are clumsy, wide and wet,
Slip-slopping through the bog and heather
All in the wild and weepy weather.
His young are many, and maltreat him;
But only hungry creatures eat him.
He pokes about in mossy holes,
Disturbing sleepless mice and moles,
And what he wants he never knows-
The damp, despised, and aimless Doze.

- James Reeves


Le dorme

Dans les sous-bois le dorme errant
S'en va gouttant, dégoulinant.
Effrayant tout être vivant,
Il fait un bruit désespérant,
Ronflement ou reniflement.
Ses poils ne sont ni courts ni longs ;
Sa queue se prend dans les buissons
Ou toute autre végétation.
Ses oreilles sont superflues.
Il vit de mûres et de jus
Ou de tout ce qu'il peut trouver.
Les pieds patauds, plats et trempés,
Il traîne entre lande et marais,
Entre averses et giboulées.
Ses nombreux petits le maltraitent
Mais seuls les goinfres s'en délectent.
Il fouille dans des trous pourris,
Réveillant taupes et souris.
Il ne sait jamais ce qu'il veut,
Ce dorme errant, maudit et vieux.

Traduction ©2006 Laurent Chiacchiérini


Haut de page

 

A farthing and a penny

For a farthing and a penny you cannot buy much,
You cannot buy a parrot nor rabbits in a hutch.
You can buy sugary sweets but not very many;
Oh what shall I buy with my farthing and a penny?

- James Reeves


Trois francs six sous

Avec trois francs six sous, on ne va pas bien loin ;
Pas moyen d'acheter un mainate, un lapin.
À part des sucreries, mais pas vraiment beaucoup,
Que pourrais-je acheter pour mes trois francs six sous ?

Traduction ©2006 Laurent Chiacchiérini


Haut de page

Waiting

Waiting, waiting, waiting
For the party to begin;
Waiting, waiting, waiting
For the laugher and din;
Waiting, waiting, waiting
With hair just so
And clothes trim and tidy
From top-knot to toe.
The floor is all shiny
The lights are ablaze;
There are sweetmeats in plenty
And cakes beyond praise.
Oh the games and dancing,
The tricks and the toys,
The music and the madness,
The colour and noise!
Waiting, waiting, waiting
For the first knock on the door-
Was ever such waiting,
such waiting before?

- James Reeves


L'attente

J'attends, j'attends, j'attends
Que la fête commence.
J'attends, j'attends, j'attends
Que l'on rie, que l'on danse.
J'attends, j'attends, j'attends
Les cheveux bien peignés,
En habits élégants
Depuis la tête aux pieds.
Le parquet est ciré,
Brillant de mille feux ;
Des bonbons par milliers
Et des gâteaux moelleux.
Les jeux et les jouets,
La musique et les cris,
L'amusement à souhait,
Les couleurs et le bruit !
J'attends, j'attends, j'attends
Que l'on frappe à la porte.
Depuis la nuit des temps,
Qui attend de la sorte ?

Traduction ©2006 Laurent Chiacchiérini


Haut de page

The Castle

Once I built a castle in the sand,
With battlements and pointed turret crowned.
The tide came up, my mother called me home,
And so I left my castle to be drowned.

That night I dreamed how in my castle tower
There stood a maid, distracted and forlorn,
Who wrung her white hands, praying for the sound
Of horse's hooves and the deliverer's horn.

- James Reeves


Le château

Un jour je construisis un château sur le sable,
Couronné de remparts et d'un donjon très haut.
Mais la marée montait, maman cria "à table !",
Alors j'abandonnai mon château dans les flots.

Dans la nuit je rêvai qu'en haut de mon donjon
Une princesse était folle et désespérée,
Tordant ses blanches mains, en espérant le son
Des pas du chevalier venant la libérer.

Traduction ©2006 Laurent Chiacchiérini


Haut de page

 

The Bisk

In Waikee-Waik
Beside the Lake,
Unseen by any stranger,
The little Bisk,
Delights to frisk,
Oblivious of all danger.

At break of day,
She seeks her prey
Along the Mukmuk River;
And when she sings
Her spotted wings
Begin to quake and quiver.

The courting male
Has for a tail
One tall luxuriant feather,
With which displayed
He make a shade
To keep her from the weather.

In summer days
One egg she lays
And finds a secret nook for it;
But she the spot
Remembers not
So sends her mate to look for it.

By Mukmuk's shore
She gathers store
Of berries each September,
But where she puts
Her nuts and fruits
She never can remember.

O gaily, gaily,
Ten times daily
She flits on careless wings!
Speak no harsh word
Of this small bird,
Who only lives to sing.

- James Reeves


La bisque

À Bergelac,
Au bord du lac,
Invisible des étrangers,
La frêle bisque
Souvent se risque,
Inconsciente de tout danger.

Au point du jour,
Un petit tour
Le long du fleuve d'à côté.
Gazouille-t-elle ?
Ses blanches ailes
Se mettent à papilloter.

Le mâle heureux
A sur la queue
Une longue plume enfoncée,
Avec laquelle
Il fait l'ombrelle
Pour abriter sa fiancée.

L'été venu,
Elle a pondu
Dans un endroit des plus cachés,
Mais oubliant,
Rapidement,
Envoie son mâle le chercher.

Au bord du fleuve,
Elle s'abreuve
Et fait sa réserve de baies.
Mais où donc sont
Ses provisions,
Elle ne peut se rappeler.

Gaiement toujours,
Dix fois par jour,
Elle volette en liberté.
Ne dites mot
De cet oiseau
Qui ne vit rien que pour chanter.

Traduction ©2006 Laurent Chiacchiérini


Haut de page

Grey

Grey is the sky, and grey the woodman's cot
With grey smoke tumbling from the chimney-pot.
The flagstones are grey that lead to the door,
Grey is the hearth, and grey the worn out floor.

The old man by the fire nods in his chair;
Grey are his clothes and silvery grey is hair.
Grey are the shadows around him creeping,
And grey the mouse from the corner peeping.

- James Reeves


Gris

Gris comme le ciel et la cabane des bois,
Gris comme la fumée qui tombe de son toit.
Gris comme les dalles conduisant à l'entrée,
Gris comme le foyer et le plancher usé.

Gris comme le vieillard assis au coin du feu ;
Gris sont ses vêtements et gris sont ses cheveux.
Gris comme les ombres rampant autour de lui,
Gris comme la souris qui dans un coin l'épie.

Traduction ©2006 Laurent Chiacchiérini


Haut de page

The Amperzand

This is the common Amperzand.
His graceful lines observe
When wiggling through the desert sand
With complicated curve.
There is no man in India's land
Who has sufficient nerve
To tame the sinuous Amperzand
Some useful end to serve.
Bring me my oboe from the shelf-
I'll make the creature stir himself!

- James Reeves


L'esperlouette

Voici venir l'esperlouette
Entre toutes reconnaissable
Aux courbes de sa silhouette
Lorsqu'elle ondule sur le sable.
Dans l'Inde tous les hommes souhaitent,
Si tant est qu'ils en soient capables,
Pouvoir dompter l'esperlouette,
Cela dans quelque but louable.
Moi, de ma seule flute armé,
Je me fais fort de la charmer !

Traduction ©2006 Laurent Chiacchiérini


Haut de page

The Song of the Dumb Waiter

Who went to sleep in the flower-bed?
Who let the fire-dog out of the shed?

Who sailed the sauce-boat down the stream?
What did the railway-sleeper dream?

Who was it chopped the boot-tree down,
And rode the clothes-horse through the town?

- James Reeves


La complainte du e muet

Qui s'est endormi dans le lit de la rivière ?
Où s'est échappé le chien du fusil hier ?

Le bateau-lavoir est à voile ou à vapeur ?
À quoi peut bien rêver le grand requin dormeur ?

Qui donc a abattu l'arbre de transmission ?
Qui a caracolé sur le cheval d'arçons ?

Traduction ©2006 Laurent Chiacchiérini


Haut de page

Snow Palace

Beside a black and frozen lake,
The palace of the Queen of Snow
Is guarded by the pointed peaks
Of icy mountains row on row.
And in the moonlight cold and keen
Like giants huge the mountains stand
Each with his spear of deadly steel
Gripped hard within his loyal hand.

- James Reeves


 

Le palais de glace

Au bord d'un lac noir et gelé,
Se dresse le palais de glace
Où vit la Reine de Thulé,
Gardée par des pics face à face.
Dans la froideur du clair de lune,
Ces montagnes impressionnantes,
La main ferme, serrent chacune
Comme une lance menaçante.

Traduction ©2006 Laurent Chiacchiérini


Haut de page

Tree Gowns

In the morning her dress is of palest green,
And in dark green in the heat of noon is she seen.
At evening she puts on a dress of rich gold,
But at night this poor lady is bare and cold.

- James Reeves


 

Les arbres

En matinée leur robe est du vert le plus pâle.
En plein midi elle devient plus verte encore.
Le soir venu elle s'orne de feuilles d'or.
Le nuit tombée les expose à un froid glacial.

Traduction ©2006 Laurent Chiacchiérini


Haut de page

The Four Horses

White Rose is a quiet horse
For a lady to ride,
Jog-trotting on the high road
Or through the countryside.

Grey Wolf is a hunter,
All muscle and fire;
Day long he will gallop
And not tumble or tire.

Black Magic's a racehorse;
She is gone like a ghost,
With the wind in her mane
To whirl past the post.

But munching his fill
In a field of green clover
Stands Brownie the cart horse
Whose labour is over.

- James Reeves


 

Quatre chevaux

Rose Blanche est une jument
Sur laquelle une cavalière
Peut trottiner tranquillement
D'une allure fière et altière.

Loup Gris est un chasseur né,
Un cheval fougueux et musclé,
Galopant toute la journée
Sans jamais tomber ni trembler.

Magie Noire est un fin coursier
Qui, plus rapide que l'éclair,
Va franchir la ligne en premier,
Fendant le vent de sa crinière.

Cependant mâchant sa ration
Au milieu d'un vert pâturage
Voici Brunet le percheron
Qui a terminé son ouvrage.

Traduction ©2006 Laurent Chiacchiérini


Haut de page

Under Ground

In the deep kingdom under ground
There is no light and little sound.

Down below the earth's green floor
The rabbit and the mole explore.

The quarrying ants run to and fro
To make their populous empires grow.

Do they, as I pass overhead,
Stop in their work to hear my tread?

Some creatures sleep and do not toil;
Secure and warm beneath the soil.

Sometimes a fork or spade intrudes
Upon their earthy solitudes.

Downward the branching tree-roots spread
Into the country of the dead.

Deep down, the buried rocks and stones
Are like the earth's gigantic bones.

In the dark kingdom under ground
How many marvellous things are found!

- James Reeves


 

Sous la terre

Dans le royaume sous la terre
Peu de bruit et point de lumière.

Sous le tapis vert de la terre
Le lapin, la taupe s'affairent.

Les fourmis courent sans faiblir
Faisant prospérer leur empire.

Arrêtent-elles leur besogne
Pour écouter mes pas qui cognent ?

Certains dorment sans sourciller
Bien à l'abri dans leur terrier.

Parfois une fourche, une bêche
Vient troubler ce discret manège.

Les racines d'arbres pénètrent
Dans le pays de nos ancêtres.

En dessous, les roches, les pierres
Sont le squelette de la terre.

Dans le royaume souterrain
Que de merveilles ô combien !

Traduction ©2006 Laurent Chiacchiérini


Haut de page

The Snitterjipe

In mellow orchards, rich and ripe,
Is found the luminous Snitterjipe.
Bad boys who climb the bulging trees
Feel his sharp breath about their knees;
His trembling whiskers tickle so,
They squeak and squeal till they let go.
They hear his far-from-friendly bark;
They see his eyeballs in the dark
Shining and shifting in their sockets
As round and big as pears in pockets.
They feel his hot and wrinkly hide;
They see his nostrils flaming wide,
His tapering teeth, his jutting jaws,
His tongue, his tail, his twenty claws.
His hairy shadow in the moon,
It makes them sweat, it makes them swoon;
And they climb the orchard wall,
They let their pilfered pippins fall.
The Snitterjipe suspends pursuit
And falls upon the fallen fruit;
And while they flee the monster fierce,
Apples, not boys, his talons pierce.
With thumping hearts they hear him munch-
Six apples at a time he'll crunch.
At length he falls asleep, and they
On tiptoe take their homeward way.
But long before the blackbirds pipe
To welcome day, the Snitterjipe
Has fled afar, and on the green
Only his fearsome prints are seen.

- James Reeves


 

Le croqueperle

Dans les vergers de Clochemerle
Rode le brillant croqueperle.
Les enfants grimpant aux pommiers
Sentent son souffle sur leurs pieds.
Ses vibrisses vibrent au point
Qu'elles leur font lâcher les mains.
Ils l'entendent pousser son cri ;
Ils voient ses yeux percer la nuit,
Luisant, louchant dans leurs orbites,
Gros comme des météorites.
Sentant sa peau chaude et ridée,
Ils voient ses naseaux s'enflammer.
Sa gueule aux cent dents qui lacèrent,
Sa queue, sa langue et ses vingt serres.
L'ombre sous la lune bombée
Dans les pommes les fait tomber
Et ils enjambent la clôture,
Leur larcin en déconfiture.
Le monstre, abandonnant la chasse,
Préfère les fruits à la place.
Prenant la poudre d'escampette,
Les enfants laissent les reinettes.
Ils l'entendent remplis d'effroi
Croquer six pommes à la fois.
Quand enfin il dort, les garçons
Rentrent sans bruit à la maison.
Mais bien avant le chant des merles
Au petit jour, le croqueperle
A pris la fuite et, dans les prés,
Laissant sa trace il disparaît.

Traduction ©2006 Laurent Chiacchiérini


Haut de page

The Grasses

The grasses nod together
In the field where I play,
And I can never quite catch
What they whisper and say.
Sometimes their talk
Seems friendly and wise,
Sometimes they speak of me
With gossip and lies.

- James Reeves


 

Les herbes

Les herbes ondulent en chœur
Dans le pré où je vais jouer.
Je ne peux saisir la teneur
De leurs murmures en secret.
Quelquefois leur conversation
Me paraît amicale et sage.
D'autres fois leurs propos ne sont
Que mensonges et commérages.

Traduction ©2007 Laurent Chiacchiérini


Haut de page

Animals' Houses

Of animal's houses,
Two sorts are found -
Those which are square ones,
And those which are round.

Square is a hen-house,
A kennel, a sty;
Cows have square houses,
And so do I!

A snail's shell is curly
A bird's nest, round;
Rabbits have twisty burrows
Underground.

But the fish in the bowl,
And the fish at sea -
Their houses are round,
As a house can be.

- James Reeves


 

Les maisons d'animaux

Les maisons d'animaux
Existant dans le monde
- Disons-le en deux mots -
Sont carrées ou bien rondes.

Carrés, le poulailler,
La niche ou l'écurie ;
Une étable est carrée,
Et ma maison aussi !

Coquilles arrondies;
De la forme d'un nid ;
Lapins pelotonnés
Au creux de leur terrier.

Poisson dans son bocal
Ou bien dans l'océan :
Sa maison est ovale,
Il tourne en rond dedans.

Traduction ©2007 Laurent Chiacchiérini


Haut de page

The Nonny

The Nonny-bird I love particularly;
All day she chirps her joysome odes.
She rises perpendicularly,
And if she goes too far, explodes.

- James Reeves


 

La nonnette

La nonnette, oiseau très spécial,
Par son chant mélodieux m'épate.
Elle monte à la verticale ;
Arrivée en haut, elle éclate.

Traduction ©2007 Laurent Chiacchiérini


Haut de page

Flowers and Frost

Flowers are yellow
And flowers are red;
Frost is white
As an old man's head.
Daffodil, foxglove,
Rose, sweet pea-
Flowers and frost
Can never agree.
Flowers will wither
And summer's lost
When over the mountain
Comes King Frost.

White are the fields
Where King Frost reigns;
And the ferns he draws
On window-panes,
White and stiff
Are their curling fronds.
White are the hedges
And stiff are the ponds.
So cruel and hard
Is winter's King.
With his icy breath
On everything.

Then up comes the sun;
Down fall the showers.
Welcome to spring
And her yellow flowers!
So sing the birds
On the budding tree,
For frost and flowers
Can never agree;
And welcome, sunshine,
That we may say
The old cruel King
Is driven away.

- James Reeves


 

Fleurs et frimas

Les fleurs sont en couleurs,
Rouges, jaunes ou bleues ;
Les frimas sont blancheur
Tels les cheveux des vieux.
Jonquille ou digitale,
Rose ou amaryllis :
Fleurs et froid hivernal
Ne sont pas bons amis.
Les fleurs bientôt se fanent,
L'été déjà s'en va :
A travers la montagne
Surgit le Roi du Froid.

Dans les champs tout est blanc
Au royaume du gel :
Ses dessins ressemblant
À de fines dentelles ;
Blancheur immaculée
Des fougères qu'il trace,
Du givre sur les haies,
Des étangs pris en glace.
Si cruel et si dur,
Le général Hiver
Insuffle la froidure
Dans tout notre univers.

Puis revient le beau temps,
Après les giboulées.
Bienvenue au printemps,
À ses fleurs colorées !
Voici l'oiseau siffleur
Niché dans le feuillage :
Les frimas et les fleurs
Ne font pas bon ménage.
À présent, tout est vert,
Chantons-le à tue-tête :
Le général Hiver
A battu en retraite.

Traduction ©2007 Laurent Chiacchiérini


Haut de page

Shiny

Shiny are the chestnut leaves
Before they unfold.
The inside of a buttercup
Is like polished gold.
A pool in the sunshine
Is bright too,
And a fine silver shilling
When it is new,
But the round, full moon,
So clear and white,
How brightly she shines
On a winter night!
Slowly she rises
Higher and higher,
With a cold clear light
Like ice on fire.

- James Reeves


 

Brillant

Brillant le bouton d'or
Qu'au matin l'on découvre.
Et la feuille qui dort
Avant qu'elle ne s'ouvre
Brillant comme la laque,
La surface d'un lac.
Brillant comme un sou neuf
Trouvé sous l'oreiller.
Brillant le jaune d'œuf
Quand il est cuit mollet.
Brillant comme une prune
Tombée sur le pré vert.
Brillant comme la lune
Par une nuit d'hiver,
Qui monte dans les cieux
Tel un glaçon en feu.

Traduction ©2007 Laurent Chiacchiérini


Haut de page

Mrs Farleigh-Fashion

Mrs Farleigh-Fashion
Flies into a passion
If any frock is finer than hers.
How she bobs and bounces
In her fleecy flounces,
She is like a queen in her feathers and furs.

She has a gown of flame,
Which puts ours to shame,
And one that billows like the boisterous sea.
She has another of silk,
White as morning milk,
That sighs and whispers like wind in a tree.

Mrs Farleigh-Fashion
With a long lilac sash on
Waltzed with the General at the County Ball.
When that great man of war
Fell senseless to the floor
We had to own that she had conquered us all.

- James Reeves


 

Madame Fait-Lamode

Madame Fait-Lamode
N'est vraiment pas commode
Tant elle est jalouse de ses belles parures.
Modèle d'élégance,
Faisant sa révérence,
Elle a l'air d'une reine emplumée de fourrures.

Sa robe tout en flammes
Fait se pâmer les dames,
Enflant, gonflant comme la houle dans la Manche.
Une autre de satin,
Tel le lait du matin,
Est blanche, bruissant comme le vent dans les branches.

Madame Fait-Lamode
Dans sa robe émeraude
Valsait avec un général pour son grand soir.
Quand cet homme de guerre
Tomba le cul par terre,
Il nous fallut bien reconnaître sa victoire.

Traduction ©2007 Laurent Chiacchiérini


Haut de page

Castles and Candlelight

Castles and candlelight
Are courtly things.
Turreted high
For the children of Kings
Stands the fair castle
Over the strand,
And there with a candle
In her thin hand,
With tunes in her ears
And gold on her head
Climbs the sad Princess
Upstairs to bed.

Castles and candlelight
Are cruel things,
For castles have dungeons,
And moths have wings.
Woe to the shepherd-boy
Who in the darkness lies,
For viewing the Princess
With love in his eyes.
Ah, the poor shepherd-boy-
How long will it be
Before the proud King
Will let him go free?

- James Reeves


 

Châteaux et chandeliers

Châteaux et chandeliers
Ont l'air majesteux.
Servant de bouclier
Pour les enfants du lieu,
Voici la citadelle
Dressée sur le chemin.
Tenant une chandelle
Dedans sa frêle main,
S'avance la Princesse,
Le front ceint d'or et d'ambre,
Les yeux pleins de tristesse,
En montant dans sa chambre.

Château et chandelier
Sont choses bien cruelles :
L'un abrite un geôlier,
L'autre brûle les ailes.
Malheur à ce berger
Qui croupit dans le noir
Pour avoir hébergé
L'amour dans son regard.
Combien le pauvre pâtre
Attendra-t-il d'années,
Lui qu'un roi acariâtre
A ainsi condamné ?

Traduction ©2007 Laurent Chiacchiérini


Haut de page

The Catipoce

'O Harry, Harry ! hold me close-
 I fear some animile.
It is the horny Catipoce
 With her outrageous smile!'

Thus spoke the maiden in alarm;
 She had good cause to fear:
The Catipoce can do great harm,
 If any come too near.

Despite her looks, do not presume
 The creature's ways are mild;
For many have gone mad on whom
 The Catipoce has smiled.

She lurks in woods at close of day
 Among the toadstools soft,
Or sprawls on musty sacks and hay
 In cellar, barn, or loft.

Behind neglected rubbish-dumps
 At dusk your blood will freeze
Only to glimpse her horny humps
 And hear her fatal sneeze.

Run, run! adventurous boy or girl-
Run home, and do not pause
To feel her breath around you curl,
And tempt her carrion claws.

Avoid her face: for underneath
 That gentle fond grimace
Lie four-and-forty crooked teeth-
 My dears, avoid her face!

'O Harry, Harry ! hold me close
 And hold me close a while;
It is the odious Catipoce
 With her devouring smile!'

- James Reeves


 

Le chatipore

“Chéri, chéri ! serre-moi fort :
 J'ai trop peur de souffrir
Sous les cornes du chatipore
 Et son affreux sourire !”

Ainsi parlait la jouvencelle,
 Justement apeurée,
Car le chatipore ensorcelle
 Qui le voit de trop près.

Malgré ses airs, n'allez pas croire
 Que ce monstre soit doux.
Nombreux sont ceux que son regard
 Joyeux a rendus fous.

Il rode dans les bois le soir
 Parmi les champignons
Ou bien se tapit dans le noir
 Sous les habitations.

Il n'est qu'à contempler sa face
 Derrière un tas d'ordures
Pour qu'aussitôt le sang se glace
 Au son de sa denture.

Cours, cours ! aventureux enfant :
 Rentre sans t'arrêter
Pour sentir son souffle étouffant
 Et ses griffes tenter.

Fuyez sa vue car en dedans,
 Sous sa tendre grimace,
Se cachent quarante-deux dents :
 Amis, fuyez sa face !

“Chéri, chéri ! serre-moi fort ;
 Serre-moi un moment,
Car c'est bien l'odieux chatipore
 Au sourire gourmand.”

Traduction ©2007 Laurent Chiacchiérini


Haut de page

Vicary Square

In Vicary Square at Thithe-On-Trent
The houses are all different,
As if they grew by accident.
For Number One
Is full of fun
With knob and knocker
To catch the sun;
And Number Four
Looks thin and poor,
And Number Five
Looks scarce alive,
And Number Seven, though clean and neat,
Looks like a lady without any feet.
But Number Eight
Is grand and great
With two fat lions
Beside the gate,
And Number Nine
Is deuced fine,
And Number Ten
Squats like a hen.
Number Twelve
Is by itself
Like a marble clock
Upon the shelf.

Number Twenty
Has chimneys in plenty,
Twenty-four is square and white,
And Twenty-Five leans to the right;
Twenty-Seven is long and low,
Twenty-Nine has a bow window.
Number Thirty
Is dark and dirty,
Number Forty
Is high and haughty,
Number Fifty
Is sly and shifty.
Fifty-Two
Has a door of blue,
Fifty-Three
Has a walnut-tree
And a balcony on the second floor.

After Fifty-Four
There aren't any more.

- James Reeves


 

Place du Vicaire

Place du Vicaire à Tarente,
Les maisons toutes différentes
Se chiffrent à plus de quarante.
Numéro Un,
Un portail brun
Dont le heurtoir
Est un miroir.
Numéro Trois,
Tout de guingois.
Numéro Cinq,
Un toit en zinc.
Numéro Sept,
Propre et bien net,
Avec deux lions
Comme en faction
De part et d'autre
D'un saint apôtre.
Numéro Neuf,
L'air flambant neuf.
Numéro Onze,
Grille de bronze.
Numéro Treize,
Tout à son aise,
Façade en marbre,
Entre deux arbres.

Au Vingt-et-un,
Des cheminées tout plein.
Le Vingt-trois a l'air d'une boîte :
Le Vingt-cinq penche vers la droite ;
Le Vingt-sept est tout en longueur ;
Et le Vingt-neuf tout en hauteur.
Le Trente-trois
N'a plus de toit,
Et le Quarante,
Pas de soupente.
Quant au Cinquante,
Il est en pente.
Cinquante-deux,
Sa porte est bleue.
Cinquante-trois,
Un magnolia,
Un balcon sous le toit.

Cinquante-six,
Fin de la liste.

Traduction ©2007 Laurent Chiacchiérini


Haut de page

The Snyke

Deep in the Jungles of Jam-kaik
Wanders the forty-legged Snyke,
And I can tell you what he's like
For I have seen him oft.
His eyes are like two coals afire;
His hair is harsh as copper wire;
His jaws are dark, and deep, and dire;
His tread is smooth and soft.

Where grows the giant scented cress
In that close-coiling wilderness
Amid the jungle silences
Where nights are thick and sweet,
The watch-dogs scarcely dare to bark;
The people tremble as they hark
To hear pad-padding through the dark
Those forty fearful feet.

'The Snyke! It is The Snyke!' they wail.
To hear that slithery, scratchy tail
The strongest feel their courage fail
And dither at the knees.
He overturns their cooking-pots;
He ties the women's hair in knots;
He bring their children out in spots,
And blights the orchard trees.

So then with arrow, spear and bow
About the woods the warriors go,
Vowing vengeance, crying Woe
Upon the dreadful Snyke.
There is a huge and special pot
By servants kept for ever hot,
In which they'll stew, when they have got,
The Terror of Jam-kaik.

They'll cut him in little slices,
Flavour him well with salt and spices,
Torment him first with slow devices,
Ingenious and sure.
Meanwhile, they have not got him yet;
He lives to make the boldest sweat,
To scare the maids, and overset
The stewpots of the poor.

- James Reeves


 

Le sarpent

Dans la jungle de Jamapan
Trotte le fabuleux sarpent.
J'en puis parler comme un savant
 Car je l'ai vu souvent.
Ses yeux sont deux charbons ardents,
Ses poils durs tels des fils d'argent ;
Ses crocs sont noirs, vifs et mordants ;
 Son pas est doux et lent.

Au milieu du cresson géant
Dans cet univers oppressant
Et le silence saisissant
 De la nuit étoilée,
Les chiens n'osent guère moufter ;
Les gens tremblent à écouter
Le tamtam dans l'obscurité
 De ses quarante pieds.

“Sarpent !”, les entend-on gémir.
Sa queue rêche les fait frémir ;
On voit les plus braves blêmir,
 Sans plus pouvoir bouger.
Il renverse le pot-au-feu,
Fait avec les cheveux des nœuds,
Rend les enfants tout boutonneux
 Et gâte les vergers.

Armés de flèches et de lances,
Dans les bois les guerriers s'élancent,
Vociférant, criant vengeance
 Contre l'affreux sarpent.
Il existe un très gros chaudron
Que l'on garde en ébullition
En prévision de la cuisson
 Du Fou de Jamapan.

Ils en feront de la saucisse,
Mettront du sel et des épices,
Le tout après quelques supplices
 Cruels et ingénieux.
En attendant, il court toujours,
Bien vivant, défiant la bravoure
Et culbutant jour après jour
 La marmite des gueux.

Traduction ©2007 Laurent Chiacchiérini


Haut de page

A Mermaid Song

She sits by the sea in the clear, shining air,
And the sailors call her Moonlight, Moonlight;
They see her smoothing her wavy hair
And they hear her singing, singing.
The sea-shells learn their tunes from her
And the big fish listen with never a stir
To catch the voice of Moonlight, Moonlight;
And I would hark for a year and a year
To hear her singing, singing.

- James Reeves


 

Chant de sirène

Assise au bord de l'eau sous le ciel étoilé,
Les marins l'appellent Sélénée, Sélénée.
Ils l'observent lissant ses cheveux ondulés
Et l'entendent de loin fredonner, fredonner.
Le coquillage apprend grâce à elle à chanter ;
Le poisson se fige comme un instantané
Pour capter la voix de Sélénée, Sélénée.
Je prêterais l'oreille année après année
Pour pouvoir l'écouter chantonner, chantonner.

Traduction ©2007 Laurent Chiacchiérini


Haut de page

What Kind of Music?

What kind of music does Tom like best?
Drums and fifes and the trumpets' bray.
What kind of music does Jenny like?
A whirling waltz-tune sweet and gay.

What music pleases Elizabeth?
She loves a symphony solemn and grand.
What kind of music does Benny like?
A roaring, rhythmical ragtime band.

But the kind of music that Mary loves
Is any little gay or comical tune,
Played on a fiddle or clarinet
That skips like a leafy stream in June.

- James Reeves


 

Quelle musique ?

Quelle musique adore Édouard ?
Les instruments d'une fanfare.
Quelle musique aime Amarante ?
Une valse gaie et marrante.

L'air favori de Sidonie ?
Une grandiose symphonie.
Quelle musique amuse Erik ?
Le son d'un orchestre rythmique.

La musique qu'aime Élodie ?
Une petite mélodie,
Un air de flûte ou de crincrin,
Sautillant tel un ru en juin.

Traduction ©2007 Laurent Chiacchiérini


Haut de page

Caroline, Caroline

Caroline, Caroline sing me a song.
Let it be a little one or let it be long.
Whether you make me weep, or make me rejoice,
Here's a silver shilling to raise up your voice.

Sing me what the mermaids sings in their sandy caves
Or sing me the birds' song from over the waves.
Sing me a sailors' song from far far away,
Or your own little song of derry-down-day.

Play me the music of the rain on the hill,
Or play any music, any music you will.
Caroline, Caroline sing to me and play;
And I will join in with your derry-down-day.

- James Reeves


 

Caroline, Caroline

Caroline, Caroline, chante-moi donc
Une chanson courte ou bien une chanson longue.
Qu'elle me tire des pleurs ou me mette en joie,
Voici un sou d'argent pour t'éclaircir la voix.

Comme une sirène en sa grotte sablonneuse
Ou bien un chant d'oiseau sur l'onde moutonneuse,
Fredonne-moi un air venu des mers lointaines
Ou bien ta chansonnette à la claire fontaine.

Joue-moi la mélodie de la pluie sur les toits
Ou toute autre musique appréciée de toi.
Caroline, Caroline, monte sur scène
Et je t'y rejoindrai à la diguedondaine.

Traduction ©2007 Laurent Chiacchiérini


Haut de page

The Osc

This is the superfluminous Osc
A mild and serious liver,
He skims each day from dawn till dusk
The surface of the river .

For gentleness he is the best
Of all amphibious creatures;
His wide and wondering eyes suggest
An old, forgotten teacher's.

In, out-in, out-he weaves his way
Along the limpid shallows,
Or upside-down hangs half a day
Amidst the ruminous sallows.

In mating time he bleats and sings
To entertain his bride,
He wiggles both his graceful wings
And jumps from side to side.

No hawk invades his harmless path,
No boar with cruel tusk,
No alligator mad with wrath
Attacks the little Osc.

He lives on fluff and water-weed
And bits of this and that
Which other creatures do not need.
His ears are round and flat.

Thus, free from terror, want and sin,
Proceeds from dusk to dusk
Out, in-out, in-with careless fin
The superfluminous Osc.

- James Reeves


 

Le loche

Le loche suprafluminoir
Est le plus doux des animaux.
Il plane du matin au soir
À la surface des cours d'eau.

De toutes les bêtes c'est celle
Qu'on reconnaît pour sa douceur.
Ses grands yeux étonnés rappellent
Ceux d'un antique professeur.

Il se faufile çà et là
À l'exemple d'une gondole,
Ou bien il dort la tête en bas,
Suspendu aux branches d'un saule.

Quand vient l'amour, il chante et bêle
Afin de plaire à sa compagne,
Agitant ses gracieuses ailes
et zigzaguant dans la campagne.

Aucun faucon sur son chemin,
Aucun sanglier ne l'approche ;
Aucun alligator malin
N'attaque l'inoffensif loche.

Il vit d'algues et de duvet,
De ce que les autres lui laissent
Et de tout ce qu'il peut trouver.
Ses oreilles sont sa faiblesse.

Loin de la peur et du besoin,
Ainsi survit de soir en soir,
De-ci de-là, ne craignant rien,
Le loche suprafluminoir.

Traduction ©2007 Laurent Chiacchiérini


Haut de page

A fire I lit

A fire I lit to warm my hands
Blazed out and leapt upon the floor
It burnt to ashes my tall house
And left me colder than before.

- James Reeves


 

J'allumai un feu

J'allumai un feu pour me réchauffer
Mais il se répandit sur mon plancher
Et il réduisit ma maison en cendres,
Me laissant dehors au froid de décembre.

Traduction ©2007 Laurent Chiacchiérini


Haut de page

The Grey Horse

A dappled horse stood at the edge of the meadow,
He was peaceful and quiet and grey as a shadow.
Something he seemed to be saying to me
As he stood in the shade of the chestnut tree.

'It's a wonderful morning,' he seemed to say,
'So jump on my back, and let's be away !
It's over the hedge we'll leap and fly,
And up the hill to the edge of the sky.

'For over the hill there are fields without end;
On the galloping downs we can run like the wind.
Down pathways we'll canter, by streams we'll stray,
Oh, jump on my back and let's be away!'

As I went by the meadow one fine summer morn,
The grey horse had gone like a ghost with the dawn;
He had gone like a ghost and not waited for me,
And it's over the hilltop he'd surely be.

- James Reeves


 

Cheval gris

Par un matin d'été je vis un cheval gris,
Paissant paisiblement au bord d'une prairie.
Dessous un marronnier l'animal pommelé
Me donna l'impression de vouloir me parler.

“Quelle belle journée”, semblait-il murmurer.
“Monte donc sur mon dos pour nous aventurer
Par-delà cette haie, si nous la franchissons,
Et gravir la colline au loin vers l'horizon.”

“Derrière la montée un champ sans fin s'étend ;
Allons y galoper, rapides tel le vent.
Nous nous promènerons, flânant dans la nature ;
Oh monte sur mon dos, partons à l'aventure !”

Un beau matin d'été lorsque je vins encore,
Le cheval gris était parti avec l'aurore ;
Fantôme évanoui sans m'avoir attendu,
Envolé dans les airs comm' de bien entendu.

Traduction ©2007 Laurent Chiacchiérini


Haut de page

Jargon

Jerusalem, Joppa, Jericho-
These are the cities of long ago.

Jasper, jacinth, jet and jade-
Of such are jewels for ladies made.

Juniper's green and jasmine's white,
Sweet jonquil is spring's delight.

Joseph, Jeremy, Jennifer, James,
Julian, Juliet-just names.

January, July and June-
Birthday late or birthday soon.

Jacket, jersey, jerkin, jeans-
What's the wear for sweet sixteens?

Jaguar, jackal, jumbo, jay-
Came to dinner but couldn't stay.

Jellies, junkets, jumbals, jam-
Mix them up for sweet-toothed Sam.

To jig, to jaunt, to jostle, to jest-
These are the things that Jack loves best.

Jazz, jamboree, jubilee, joke-
The jolliest words you ever spoke.

From A to Z and Z to A
The joyfullest letter of all is J.

- James Reeves


 

Jargon

Jérusalem, Jéricho ou Jaffa,
Ce sont les noms de cités d'autrefois.

Joyaux jadis de jaspe, jade ou jais,
J'aime ces gemmes chez le joaillier.

Jacinthe ou jasmin, jalons du chemin,
Jonquilles jaunes jonchant les jardins.

Jean, Jacques, Joseph, Julien ou Jérôme,
C'est juste ainsi qu'on prénomme les hommes.

Jeudis, jours de janvier, juin ou juillet,
Joies des jeunes années où je jouais.

Jaquette, jupe en jersey ou jabot,
Jusqu'où aller pour être jugé beau ?

Jaguar, jacamar ou jacaranda,
Jungle jaillissant sous ma véranda.

Jambon, jarret de jars, jus de jujube,
Jeûner plutôt que de manger en tubes.

Jongler, jouter, jeter le javelot,
Jeux journaliers auxquels joue Lancelot.

Joueur de jazz, jamboree, jubilé,
Je jubile quand j'en entends parler.

Jamais je ne vis lettre plus jolie
Ou juste plus joyeuse que le J.

Traduction ©2007 Laurent Chiacchiérini


Haut de page

Queer Things

'Very, very queer things have been happening to me
In some of the places where I've been.
I went to the pillar-box this morning with a letter
And a hand came out and took it in.

'When I got home again, I thought I'd have
A glass of spirits to steady myself;
And I take my bible oath, but that bottle and glass
Came a-hopping down off the shelf.

'No, no, I says, I'd better take no spirits,
And I sat down to have a cup of tea;
And blowed if my old pair of carpet-slippers
Didn't walk across the carpet to me!

'So I took my newspaper and went into the park,
And looked round to see no one was near,
When a voice right out of the middle of the paper
Started reading the news bold and clear!

'Well, I guess there's some magician out to help me,
So perhaps there's no need for alarm;
And if I manage not to anger him,
Why should he do me any harm?'

- James Reeves


 

Bizarre

Il m'arrive aujourd'hui des choses fort bizarres,
Choses que je m'en vais vous narrer sans retard.
Allant jusqu'à la boîte y poster une lettre,
J'en vois sortir une main, la prendre et l'y mettre.

Rentré à la maison, je me dis que j'aurais
Besoin d'un bon verre pour me revigorer ;
Je suis soufflé de voir la bouteille et le verre
Descendre en bondissant tout seuls de l'étagère.

Je me dis qu'il vaut mieux que j'arrête de boire,
Que j'avale plutôt un petit café noir ;
Ne voilà-t-il pas que mes vieilles charentaises
Marchent sur le tapis jusqu'aux pieds de ma chaise !

Mon journal sous le bras, je m'en vais dans le square,
M'asseyant sur un banc, bien tranquille à l'écart,
Et voici qu'une voix venant droit du journal
Me lit l'actualité en lettres capitales !

Ce doit être le fait de quelque magicien,
Inutile donc que je m'alarme pour rien ;
Si je ne courrouce pas cet ange gardien,
Que pourrait-il me vouloir d'autre que du bien ?

Traduction ©2007 Laurent Chiacchiérini


Haut de page

Others

'Mother, oh, mother! Where shall we hide us?
Others there are in the house beside us -
Moths and mice and crooked brown spiders!'

- James Reeves


 

Les autres

“Maman, ô maman, où aller nous réfugier ?
D'autres que nous habitent dans notre grenier :
Des souris, des insectes et des araignées !”

Traduction ©2007 Laurent Chiacchiérini


Haut de page

Miss Petal

Sweet Miss Petal,
She sings like a kettle,
 Tra-la!
Dancing, dancing
Wherever she goes,
She twirls about
On the points of her toes.
 Tra-la!
Like a moth she dances
On fluttery wings,
Like a silver kettle
She bubbles and sings,
 Tra-la!
Neat she is
Like a little white rose,
Twirling about
On the points of her toes,
Flitting and trilling
Wherever she goes,
 Tra-la!
Dear Miss Petal,
If only she'd settle-
 But no!
From morn till night,
Day in day out,
She turns and turns
Like a roundabout.
If only, if only
She'd come to rest
Like a bee on a bush,
A bird on a nest.
If only, if only
She'd sit and settle,
Like a sensible, sober,
Sweet Miss Petal-
 But no!
Away she goes
On her twinkling toes,
High on her toes
Like a tippling top,
And nobody knows
If sweet Miss Petal
Who sings like a kettle
Will ever settle
 And stop!

- James Reeves


 

Mamzel Pétale

Mamzel Pétale chante
Comme de l'eau bouillante,
 Tralalalalè-re !
Elle danse, elle danse
En toute circonstance ;
Elle aime à toupiller
Sur la pointe des pieds.
 Tralalalalè-re !
Papillon de nuit, elle
Bat sans répit des ailes
Ou, bouilloire argentée,
Ne cesse de chanter,
 Tralalalalè-re !
Habillée en dimanche
Comme une rose blanche,
Tournoyant sans arrêt
Sur la pointe des pieds,
Elle chante, elle danse
En toute circonstance,
 Tralalalalè-re !
Si au moins elle était
Capable d'arrêter
 Mais non !
Du matin jusqu'au soir,
Qu'il fasse jour ou noir,
Elle tourne, elle tourne
Et jamais ne séjourne.
Si elle seulement
Se posait un moment,
Abeille sous la pluie
Ou oiseau dans son nid.
Si du moins elle osait
Un peu se reposer,
Comme un navire étale,
Douce Mamzel Pétale
 Mais non !
La voilà repartie
Qui chante et qui sautille,
Tout heureuse de vivre
Comme une toupie ivre,
Et personne ne sait
Si elle va cesser
Un beau jour de chanter
Pour enfin s'arrêter
 Ou non !

Traduction ©2007 Laurent Chiacchiérini


Haut de page

Musetta of the mountains

Musetta of the mountains
 She lives amongst the snow,
Coming and going softly
 On a white doe.
Her face is pale and smiling
 Her hair is of gold ;
She wears a red mantle
 To keep her from the cold.

Musetta of the mountains,
 She rides in the night
On her swift-footed doe
 So gentle and light;
In the frosty starlight
 Sometimes you may hear
The bells on its bridle
 Far away but clear.

Sometimes from the far snows
 The winter wind brings
The thin voice of Musetta,
 And this is what she sings:
'Follow me and follow me
 And come to my mountains.
I will show you eagles' nests
 By the frozen fountains.

'Death-cold are the high peaks
 Of the mountains lone,
But a marvellous sight
 Is the snow-queen's throne.
Death-cold are the mountains
 And the winds sharp as spite,
But warm is the welcome
 In my cabin at night.'

Thus sings Musetta
 In the frosty air,
While the delicate snowflakes
 Light on her hair.
But there is none to follow her,
 No one to ride
Away with fair Musetta
 To the far mountain-side.

- James Reeves


 

Musette des montagnes

Musette des montagnes
 Vit au milieu des neiges
Sillonnant la campagne
 Sur une biche beige.
Son visage est charmant,
 Sa chevelure est d'or ;
Son manteau éclatant
 Garde le froid dehors.

Musette des montagnes
 Chevauche dans la nuit
Sa véloce compagne
 Si douce et si jolie.
Sous le froid firmament,
 Quelquefois l'on entend
Son joyeux tintement
 Distinct quoique distant.

Dans le pays helvète,
 Avec le vent d'hiver,
Sa voix toute fluette
 Nous parvient par les airs.
Sa chansonnette espiègle
 Nous invite à la suivre :
“Vous verrez des nids d'aigle,
 Des fontaines de givre.”

“Des pics d'un froid mortel
 Forment comme une chaîne
Mais que la vue est belle
 Sur ce trône de reine.
La morsure du vent
 A de quoi vous geler ;
Soyez bienvenu dans
 Mon chaleureux chalet.”

Ainsi va sa chanson
 Dans le froid vigoureux,
Tandis que les flocons
 Parsèment ses cheveux.
Mais nul ne l'accompagne,
 La charmante Musette,
À travers les montagnes
 Vers le pays helvète.

Traduction ©2007 Laurent Chiacchiérini


Haut de page

Stocking and shirt

Stocking and shirt
 Can trip and prance,
Though nobody's in them
 To make them dance.
See how they waltz
 Or minuet,
Watch the petticoat
 Pirouette.
This is the dance
 Of stocking and shirt,
When the wind puts on
 The white lace skirt.
Old clothes and young clothes
 Dance together,
Twirling and whirling
 In the mad March weather.
'Come !' cries the wind,
 To stocking and shirt.
'Away !' cries the wind
 To blouse and skirt.
Then clothes and wind
 All pull together,
Tugging like mad
 In the mad March weather.
Across the garden
 They suddenly fly
And over the far hedge
 High, high, high !
'Stop!' cries the housewife,
 But all too late,
Her clothes have passed
 The furthest gate.
They are gone for ever
 In the bright blue sky,
And only the handkerchiefs
 Wave good-bye.

- James Reeves


 

Le linge sur le fil

Le linge sur le fil
 Se montre fort agile ;
Personne n'est dedans,
 Il danse cependant.
Voyez comme il gigote
 Et danse la gavotte ;
Regardez le jupon
 Danser le rigaudon.
C'est la valse subtile
 Du linge sur le fil,
Lorsque le vent enfile
 La dentelle fragile.
Tissus jeunes et vieux
 Dansent à qui mieux mieux,
Tournant, tourbillonnant
 Dans le vent du printemps.
“Viens avec moi !”, crie-t-il
 Au linge sur le fil.
“Sauvez-vous”, crie le vent
 À tous ces vêtements.
Les vêtements, le vent
 S'écharpent en tirant
Tels des fous sur le fil
 Par ce matin d'avril.
Tout s'envole soudain
 À travers le jardin
Et par-dessus la haie
 Le linge a décollé !
La ménagère crie
 Mais son linge est parti ;
Les habits dans la rue
 Ont bientôt disparu.
Ils s'en vont en voyage
 Là-haut dans les nuages ;
Il n'y a que les mouchoirs
 Pour lui dire au revoir.

Traduction ©2007 Laurent Chiacchiérini


Haut de page

Village Sounds

Lie on this green and close your eyes-
 A busy world you'll hear
Of noises high and low, and loud
 And soft, and far and near.

Amidst the squawking geese and ducks ;
 And hens that cluck and croon,
The rooster on the dung-hill sings
 His shrill, triumphant tune.

A watch-dog barks to scare away
 Some sudden passer-by;
The dog wakes Mrs Goodman's Jane
 And she begins to cry.

And now the crying babe is still;
 You hear young blacksmith George
Din-dinning on his anvil bright
 Far off in his black forge.

Then on his tinkling cycle comes
 The postman with his load,
And motor-buses sound their horns
 Upon the London Road.

Sometimes a hay-cart rumbles past,
 The old sow grunts and stirs,
And in John Farrow's timber-yard
 The engine throbs and whirrs.

Just across there the schoolroom stands,
 And from the open door
You hear the sound of 'Billy Boy'
 Or else of four times four.

At half-past-three a sudden noise-
 The children come from school,
And shouting to the meadow run
 To play beside the pool.

And then, when all these sounds are still
 In the hot afternoon,
As you lie on the quiet green
 You'll hear my favourite tune.

Down from the green boughs overhead
 The gentlest murmurs float,
As hour by hour the pigeon coos
 His soft contented note.

- James Reeves


 

Bruits de village

Allonge-toi, ferme les yeux :
 Tu entendras alors
Des bruits simples et merveilleux
 Résonnant bas ou fort.

Les volailles du poulailler
 Vont gloussant, caquetant ;
Le coq dressé sur le fumier
 Hurle un chant triomphant.

Un chien aboie pour éloigner
 Un passant apeuré.
Son cri réveille un nouveau-né
 Qui se met à pleurer.

Lorsqu'enfin le bébé s'apaise
 L'on peut entendre Georges
Battant le fer chaud comme braise
 Au fin fond de sa forge.

Soudain une sonnette sonne -
 Le vélo du facteur -
Tandis que l'autobus klaxonne
 En croisant un tracteur.

La remorque de foin s'éloigne,
 Un cochon grogne et boit ;
Dans une maison de campagne,
 Quelqu'un coupe du bois.

Là-bas c'est la cour de récré
 Et sa foison de sons ;
L'on entend crisser une craie
 Ou lire une leçon.

Puis vers la demie de quatre heures,
 Les écoliers se ruent,
Criant la fin de leur labeur
 Et jouant dans la rue.

Enfin quand ce vacarme cesse
 En fin d'après-midi,
L'on peut percevoir la caresse
 De mon air favori.

Descendant des verts marronniers,
 Flottant tel un murmure,
Le roucoulement des ramiers
 Joue une note pure.

Traduction ©2007 Laurent Chiacchiérini


Haut de page

Old Moll

The moon is up,
 The night owls scritch.
Who's that croaking?
 The frog in the ditch.
Who's that howling?
 The old hound bitch.
My neck tingles,
 My elbows itch,
My hair rises,
 My eyelids twitch.
What's in that pot
 So rare and rich?
Who's that crouching
 In a cloak like pitch?
Hush! That's Old Moll-
 They say she's a
Most ree-markable old party.

- James Reeves


 

La vieille

La lune étend sa silhouette ;
 On entend chuinter une chouette.
Qui est en train de coasser ?
 C'est le crapaud dans le fossé.
Qui donc hurle à en perdre haleine ?
 Sans doute quelque vieille chienne.
J'ai les coudes qui font des trucs,
 Des picotements dans la nuque,
Et les cheveux qui se hérissent,
 Et les paupières qui se plissent.
Qu'est-ce qui cuit dans ce chaudron ?
 C'est de la soupe au potiron.
Que cache cette cape sombre,
 Cette forme accroupie dans l'ombre ?
Chut ! C'est une vieille commère
 Dont on jase dans les chaumières
Que c'est une vieille euh... charmante.

Traduction ©2007 Laurent Chiacchiérini


Haut de page

Dr John Hearty

Dr John Hearty,
 Though old as a fossil,
Could dance like a fairy
 And sing like a throstle.

He had not a tooth left
 To ache and decay,
And his hair, white as snow,
 Had melted away.

He had lived in this world
 A weary long while,
And all that he saw in it
 Caused him to smile.

For shocking they might be,
 The things that he saw,
But old Dr Hearty
 Had seen worse before.

He had patients in plenty
 So deathly and grim,
But their ills were all cured
 With laughing at him.

For Dr John Hearty
Though old as a fossil,
Could dance like a fairy
 And sing like a throstle.

- James Reeves


 

Docteur Beaumoqueur

Le Docteur Beaumoqueur
 Nonobstant son grand âge
Danse de tout son cœur
 Et chante au patronage.

Il n'a plus une dent
 Et donc plus de caries,
Et ses cheveux d'argent
 Ont l'air tout décatis.

Il a si bien vécu
 Dans ce monde en délire
Que tout ce qu'il a vu
 L'a porté à sourire.

Il a vu des horreurs
 Impossibles à dire,
Mais le bon vieux docteur
 Avait déjà vu pire.

Dans son infirmerie,
 Il eut plein de malades ;
Il les a tous guéris
 Grâce à la rigolade.

Car Monsieur Beaumoqueur
 Nonobstant son grand âge
Danse de tout son cœur
 Et chante au patronage.

Traduction ©2007 Laurent Chiacchiérini


Haut de page

Bells

Hard as crystal,
 Clear as an icicle
Is the tinkling sound
 Of a bell on a bicycle.

The bell in the clock
 That stands on the shelf
Slowly, sleepily
 Talks to itself.

The school bell is noisy
 And bangs like brass.
'Hurry up! Hurry up!
 Late for class!'

But deep and distant
 And peaceful to me
Are the bells I hear
 Below the sea.

Lying by the sea-shore
 On a calm day
Sometimes I hear them
 Far, far away.

With solemn tune
 In stately time
Under the water
 I hear them chime.

Why do the bells
 So stately sound?
For sea-king dead
 A sailor drowned?

Hark, how they peal
 Far, far away!
Is it a mermaid's
 Marriage-day?

Do they ring for joy
 Or weeping or war,
Those bells I hear
 As I lie by the shore?

But merry or mournful
 So sweet to me
Are those dreamy bells
 Below the sea.

- James Reeves


 

Sons de cloche

Pureté cristalline,
 Tintant comme un glaçon,
Le vélo qui chemine
 Fait retentir son son.

La pendule qui trône
 Seule dans le salon
Sonne un air monotone,
 Trouvant le temps bien long.

La cloche de l'école
 Sonne comme un clairon,
Menaçant d'une colle
 Tous ceux qui traîneront.

Mais profond et distant
 Et combien apaisant
Est le son que j'entends
 Tinter sous l'océan.

Allongé près des roches,
 Par un calme matin,
Parfois j'entends des cloches
 Là-bas dans le lointain.

Avec solennité,
 Comme une procession,
Sous les flots agités,
 J'entends leur carillon.

Sonnent-elles le glas
 Pour la mort de Neptune
Ou bien pour le trépas
 D'un marin à la hune ?

Écoutez leur message
 Dans la brume lointaine !
Est-ce pour le mariage
 D'une jolie sirène ?

Annonce-t-elle un temps
 De guerre ou bien de trêve,
La cloche que j'entends,
 Étendu sur la grève ?

Joyeuses ou tragiques,
 Elles bercent mon cœur,
Ces cloches oniriques
 Montant des profondeurs.

Traduction ©2007 Laurent Chiacchiérini


Haut de page

The Musical Box

Mary, Mary come and listen a minute!
Here's a little wooden box with music in it.
There are little bells inside, and they tinkle and play,
And 'Early One Morning' are the words they say.

Early one morning to the woods we will run,
And see the sweet flowers at the rising of the sun.
We will join hands together and dance in a ring
And 'The Bluebells of Scotland' is the tune we will sing.

The bluebells of Scotland they jingle merrily,
And the tune that they ring is 'The Miller of Dee'.
The jolly, jolly miller, he whistles as he goes,
And the 'Merry Widow Waltz' is the best tune he knows.

The merry, merry widow, she loves to sing and play,
And the song that she sings is 'The Vicar of Bray'.
Oh, hear the vicar sing with his mellow mellow voice,
And 'Bonnie Annie Laurie' is the song of his choice.

Annie, she can sing and dance like a fairy,
And the song she loves best of all is 'Mary, Mary'.
Mary, Mary, come and listen a minute!
Here's a little wooden box with music in it.

- James Reeves


 

La boîte à musique

Marie, Marie, viens donc écouter un instant
Cette boîte avec de la musique dedans.
Clochettes, clochettes, qui tintinnabulez,
L'on vous entend jouer “Colchiques dans les prés”.

De bonne heure un matin nous irons dans les bois
Voir au lever du jour si les fleurs sont bien là.
Nous ferons une ronde en la forêt lointaine
Et nous entonnerons “À la claire fontaine”.

Et l'eau de la fontaine épand ses notes d'or,
Mélodie égrenant l'air de “Meunier, tu dors”.
Le gentil meunier dort mais son moulin chantonne
La “Veuve Joyeuse” et sa valse monotone.

La joyeuse veuve aime à chanter tralala
Et son air favori est “J'ai du bon tabac”.
Elle tousse une fois pour s'éclaircir la voix
Et chante “Il pleut, bergère” au moment de son choix.

La bergère en chantant rentre ses blancs moutons
Avant d'aller danser sur le pont d'Avignon.
Marie, Marie, viens donc écouter un instant
Cette boîte avec de la musique dedans.

Traduction ©2007 Laurent Chiacchiérini


Haut de page

You'd Say it was a Wedding

You'd say it was a wedding
 So glib and gay the talk is,
When old Mr Dorkis
 Goes out with Mrs Dorkis.

Of horses, carts, carriages,
Birthdays and marriages,
Of old friends and foes,
Of windfalls and woes,
Of bad luck and good luck
With cow, calf, chicken or duck-
Of such is their talk
When they go for a walk.

As many are the jokes
 Of old Mr Dorkis
As a wheel has spokes
 Or a pig porkers.

- James Reeves


 

On aurait dit des fiançailles

On aurait dit des fiançailles
 Tant il y avait de gaie ripaille
Dans les propos que s'échangeaient
 Monsieur et Madame Dorgeais.

De chevaux, de carrosses,
De fêtes et de noces,
D'amis et d'ennemis,
De joies et de labeurs,
De malheur, de bonheur,
D'œufs et de salami...
De cela ils parlaient
Quand ils se promenaient.

Nombreux sont les bons mots
 Du vieux Monsieur Dorgeais,
Autant que les ormeaux
 Ou les porcs au marché.

Traduction ©2007 Laurent Chiacchiérini


Haut de page

You'd Say it was a Funeral

You'd say it was a funeral, a funeral
 So dreary and so dim,
 So ghoulish and so grim
Is the conversation, the conversation
 Of Mr and Mrs Mimm.

Of accidents, bad accidents,
 Of widows, wars and wills,
Of tragedy, dark tragedy,
 And chills and pills and bills,
 Of doctoring and lawyering
 And quarrelling so dire,
Of burying, sad burying,
 And farms on fire.
Of sickness and starvation
 And all things grave and grim,
Of such is the conversation
 Of Mr and Mrs Mimm.

- James Reeves


 

On aurait dit des funérailles

On aurait dit des funérailles
 Tant il y avait de la grisaille,
 De tristesse et de componction
Au long de la conversation
 De Monsieur et Madame Honion.

Des incidents, des accidents,
 Des veuves et des testaments,
Des tragédies sans précédent,
 Des fièvres, des médicaments,
Des médecins, des avocats,
 Des assassins ou des bandits,
Voire pire dans certains cas,
 De gigantesques incendies,
Des épidémies, des famines
 Et d'autres choses qui vous minent,
Telle était la conversation
 De ce vieux couple de grognons.

Traduction ©2007 Laurent Chiacchiérini


Haut de page

The Blackbird in the Lilac

'Good fortune!' and 'Good fortune!'
I heard the blackbird in the lilac say,
As I set out upon the road to somewhere
 That sunny summer's day.

 Gay ribbons and sad ballads
And suchlike things I carried in my pack,
But thought of home was heavier than the load
 And I had upon my back.

 'Come buy, come buy, fine people!'
I cried on bridges and in market squares;
On village greens I showed my toys and trifles,
 But none would have my wares.

 Yet still I sing my ballads,
And think of home, and go where fortune leads.
Homewards I will not turn without good fortune,
 Though none my singing heeds.

 For still I hear the blackbird
Wish me good fortune from the lilac sweet;
Such songs as his, amid the summer's promise,
 Could never be deceit.

- James Reeves


 

Le merle du lilas

“Bonne fortune tu feras !”
Me dit le merle du lilas,
Comme je me mettais en route
 Par cette jolie journée d'août.

 Quelques gais rubans et quelques tristes ballades,
Voilà ce que j'avais pour partir en balade ;
Le mal du pays est le plus lourd des fardeaux
 De tout ce que j'avais à porter sur mon dos.

 “Venez acheter, braves gens !”
Proclamais-je à tous les passants ;
Je montrais mes colifichets,
 Mais tout le monde s'en fichait.

 Je chante encore et mon pays je n'oublie pas,
Je vais là où la fortune guide mes pas.
Je ne m'en retournerai que fortune faite,
 Bien que nul à mes chansons d'attention ne prête.

 Car j'entends toujours de là-bas
Le souhait du merle du lilas ;
Cette promesse de l'été
 Ne me fera point déchanter.

Traduction ©2007 Laurent Chiacchiérini


Haut de page

Mick

 Mick my mongrel-O
 Lives in a bungalow,
Painted green with a round doorway.
 With an eye for cats
 And a nose for rats
He lies on his threshold half the day.
 He buries his bones
 By the rockery stones,
And never, oh never, forgets the place,
 Ragged and thin
 From his tail to his chin ;
He looks at you with a sideways face.
 Dusty and brownish,
 Wicked and clownish,
He'll win no prize at the County Show,
 But throw him a stick,
 And up jumps Mick,
And right through the flower-beds see him go!

- James Reeves


 

Mon bâtard

 Mon bâtard n'est pas riche,
 Il habite une niche,
Peinte en vert et avec une porte arrondie.
 Il a l'œil pour les chats
 Et le nez pour les rats,
Mais il dort sur son seuil tout un après-midi.
 Il enterre ses os
 Près de la pièce d'eau
Et il n'oublie jamais là où il les a mis.
 De la queue au museau,
 Il n'est vraiment pas gros ;
Il observe souvent de travers mes amis.
 Poussiéreux, goguenard
 Et le poil en pétard,
Il ne gagnerait pas de prix à un concours,
 Mais lancez une balle
 Et voici qu'il détale ;
À travers les massifs, voyez donc comme il court !

Traduction ©2007 Laurent Chiacchiérini


Haut de page

The FootPrint

Poor Crusoe saw with fear-struck eyes
 The footprint on the shore-
Oh ! what is this that shines so clear
 Upon the bathroom floor?

- James Reeves


 

L'empreinte

Robinson frémit en voyant
 L'empreinte sur la plage.
Qui a laissé ce pied brillant
 Sur mon beau carrelage ?

Traduction ©2007 Laurent Chiacchiérini


Haut de page

The Two Mice

There met two mice at Scarborough
 Beside the rushing sea,
The one from Market Harborough,
 The other from Dundee.

They shook their feet, they clapped their hands,
 And twirled their tails about;
They danced all day upon the sands
 Until the stars peeped out.

'I'm much fatigued,' the one mouse sighed,
 'And ready for my tea.'
'Come hame awa',' the other cried,
 'And tak' a crumb wi' me.'

They slept awhile, and then next day
 Across the moors they went;
But sad to say, they lost their way
 And came to Stoke-on-Trent.

And there it soon began to rain,
 At which they cried full sore:
'If ever we get home again,
 We'll not go dancing more.'

- James Reeves


 

Deux souris

Deux souris se virent un jour
 Au bord de la mer en furie ;
La première était de Cherbourg
 Et l'autre arrivait de Paris.

Battant des mains, tapant des pieds
 Et faisant tournoyer leur queue,
Elles dansent un jour entier
 Jusqu'à l'étoilement des cieux.

“Cette danse m'a éreintée”,
 Soupire celle de Paris.
“Allons donc chez moi prendre un thé”,
 Lui propose l'autre souris.

Ayant dormi, le lendemain,
 Elles franchirent les marais,
Mais se perdirent en chemin
 Et parvinrent à Camaret.

Quand la pluie tomba tout à coup,
 Elles se mirent à penser :
“Si jamais nous rentrons chez nous,
 Plus jamais nous n'irons danser.”

Traduction ©2007 Laurent Chiacchiérini


Haut de page

The Three Unlucky Men

Near Wookey Hole in days gone by
 Lived three unlucky men.
The first fell down a Treacle Mine
 And never stirred again.

The second had no better fate
 And he too is no more.
He fell into a Custard Lake
 And could not get to shore.

The third poor fellow, sad to say,
 He had no fairer luck,
For he climbed up a Porridge Hill
 And half-way down got stuck.

Alas, alas ! man is but grass,
 Let life be short or long;
And all the birds cried 'Fancy that!'
 To hear this merry song.

- James Reeves


 

Trois malchanceux

Il était une fois
 Trois malchanceux de choix.
L'un, pris dans la mélasse,
 Resta cloué sur place.

Le destin du deuxième
 Fut à peu près le même.
Il tomba dans la crème
 Et s'y noya idem.

Le troisième, je pense,
 N'eut guère plus de chance.
Grimpant dans la bouillie,
 Il y fut englouti.

Hélas, trois fois hélas !
 L'homme est dans la mélasse
Et les oiseaux gazouillent
 En observant sa bouille.

Traduction ©2007 Laurent Chiacchiérini


Haut de page

Bluebells and Foxgloves

If bluebells could be rung
 In early summer time
The sound you'd hear would be
 A small, silvery chime.

The bells on foxgove spires,
 If they could once be tolled,
Would give a mellow sound
 As deep and rich as gold.

The bluebells and foxgloves-
 If they together pealed,
Who knows what elfin footsteps
 Would crowd across the field?

- James Reeves


 

Campanules et digitales

Si leurs cloches tintaient
 Par un matin d'été,
Alors nous ouïrions
 Un léger carillon.

Si elles s'agitaient,
 Mues par des doigts gantés,
Leur son serait alors
 Aussi riche que l'or.

Si les cloches des fleurs
 Carillonnaient en chœur,
Des pas d'elfes pourraient
 Bien se voir dans les prés.

Traduction ©2007 Laurent Chiacchiérini


Haut de page

Run a Little

Run a little this way,
 Run a little that!
Fine new feathers
 For a fine new hat.
A fine new hat
 For a lady fair-
Run around and turn about
 And jump in the air.

Run a little this way,
 Run a little that!
White silk ribbon
 For a black silk cat.
A black silk cat
 For the Lord Mayor's wife-
Run around and turn about
 And fly for your life!

- James Reeves


 

Cours un peu

Cours un peu par ici
 Et cours un peu par là !
Les plumes que voici
 Pour un beau chapeau plat.
Un beau chapeau tout neuf
 Pour une gente dame.
Tourne et cours comme un œuf,
 Danse comme une flamme.

Cours un peu par ici
 Et cours un peu par là !
Un ruban blanc aussi
 Pour un chat peau de soie
Un chat peau de soie noir
 Pour la femme du Roi.
Cours et tourne pour voir
 Et puis chacun pour soi !

Traduction ©2007 Laurent Chiacchiérini


Haut de page

The Four Letters

N,
  S,
    W,
    and E...
These are the letters which I can see
High on top of the old grey church
Where the golden rooster has his perch.
What they mean I do not know,
Though somebody told me long ago.
It might be that and it might be this,
But here is what I think it is:
N for Nowhere, S for Somewhere,
E for Everywhere, and W for Where—
And if I am wrong, I don't much care.

- James Reeves


 

Les quatres lettres

N
  S
    O
      E
Sont les lettres que j'aperçois
Au sommet de ce vieux clocher
Où un coq doré est perché.
Pour dire quoi sont-elles là,
J'ai oublié depuis longtemps.
Chacun met ce qu'il veut dedans,
Mais voici ce que moi j'en pense :
N pour Nulle part, S pour Sens,
E pour Egaré, O pour Où,
Et puis si j'ai tort, je m'en f...

Traduction ©2007 Laurent Chiacchiérini


Haut de page

Explorers

The furry moth explores the night,
 The fish discover cities drowned,
And moles and worms and ants explore
 The many cupboards underground.

The soaring lark explores the sky,
 And gulls explore the stormy sea.
The busy squirrel rummages
 Among the attics of the trees.

- James Reeves


 

Explorateurs

Le papillon duveteux explore la nuit,
 Le poisson découvre des cités englouties,
Les taupes et les vers ainsi que les fourmis
 Explorent les nombreux garde-manger enfouis.

L'alouette s'élance pour explorer les airs,
 La mouette explore la tumultueuse mer.
L'écureuil affairé fouille dans les feuillages
 Comme dans un grenier au milieu des ramages.

Traduction ©2007 Laurent Chiacchiérini


Haut de page

The Intruder

Two-boots in the forest walks,
Pushing through the bracken stalks.

Vanishing like a puff of smoke,
Nimbletail flies up the oak.

Longears helter-skelter shoots
Into his house among the roots.

At work upon the highest bark,
Tapperbill knocks off to hark.

Painted-wings through sun and shade
Flounces off along the glade.

Not a creature lingers by,
When clumping Two-boots comes to pry.

- James Reeves


 

L’intrus

Deux-Bottes franchit les fougères,
Écartant leurs tiges légères.

Boule-de-Poil comme fumée
S'évanouit dans la ramée.

Grandes-Z'Oreil se réfugie
Au plus profond de son logis.

Bec-Effilé sous le soleil
Se fige pour prêter l'oreille.

Plumes-Teintées, l'air en colère,
S'envole à travers la clairière.

Pas un animal ne s'attarde
Tandis que Deux-Bottes musarde.

Traduction ©2007 Laurent Chiacchiérini


Haut de page

Yellow Wheels

A yellow gig has Farmer Patch;
 He drives a handsome mare-
Two bright wheels and four bright hooves
 To carry him to the fair.

Yellow wheels, where are you off to,
 Twinkling down the lane,
Sparkling in the April sunshine
 And the April rain?

Farmer Patch we do not love;
 He wears a crusty frown.
But how we love to see his gig
 Go spanking off to town!

Yellow wheels, where are you off to,
 Twinkling down the lane,
Sparkling in the April sunshine
 And the April rain?

- James Reeves


 

Roues dorées

Le pèr'Lopin a un chariot
 Tiré par une jument noire :
Deux roues dorées, quatre sabots
 Pour l'emmener jusqu'à la foire.

Ô roues dorées, où courez-vous
 Sur le chemin de la grand-ville,
Brillant sous le soleil si doux
 Autant que sous la pluie d'avril ?

Nous n'aimons pas le personnage
 Car il fronce un grincheux sourcil.
Nous préférons son attelage
 Quand il file clinquant en ville.

Ô roues dorées, où courez-vous
 Sur le chemin de la grand-ville,
Brillant sous le soleil si doux
 Autant que sous la pluie d'avril ?

Traduction ©2007 Laurent Chiacchiérini


Haut de page

Things to Remember

The buttercups in May,
The wild rose on the spray,
The poppy in the hay,

The primrose in the dell,
The freckled foxglove bell,
The honeysuckle's smell

Are things I would remember
When cheerless, raw November
Makes room for dark December.

- James Reeves


 

Souvenirs en novembre

Boutons d'or en plein mai,
Églantine en bouquet,
Coqueliquot des blés,

Primevère vernale,
Taches de digitale,
Chèvrefeuille estival...

Souvenirs en novembre,
Froide et morne antichambre
De la nuit de décembre.

Traduction ©2007 Laurent Chiacchiérini


Haut de page

A Garden at Night

On powdery wings the white moths pass,
And petals fall on the dewy grass;
Over the bed where the poppy sleeps
The furtive fragrance of lavender creeps.
Here lived an old lady in days long gone,
And the ghost of that lady lingers on.
She sniffs the roses, and seems to see
The ripening fruit on the orchard tree;
Like the scent of flowers her spirit weaves
Its winding way through the maze of leaves;
Up and down like the moths it goes:
Never and never it finds repose.
Gentle she was, and quiet and kind,
But flitting and restless was her old mind.
So hither and thither across the lawn
Her spirit wanders, till grey of dawn
Rouses the cock in the valley far,
And the garden waits for the morning star.

- James Reeves


 

Un jardin la nuit

Les ailes poudreuses des blancs papillons passent,
Les pétales tombant vont joncher l'herbe grasse ;
Sur le coquelicot qui dort profondément,
L'effluve de lavande erre furtivement.
Ici vivait une vieille il y a bien longtemps
Et son fantôme hante les allées du temps.
Elle hume les roses et paraît observer
Les fruits qui mûrissent aux branches du verger.
Tel le parfum des fleurs ce revenant voyage
Suivant le labyrinthe embrouillé du feuillage,
Comme les papillons volant de bas en haut,
Jamais au grand jamais ne trouvant le repos.
Cette personne était douce, calme et charmante,
Mais elle était de ceux que leur esprit tourmente.
De ci, de là sur l'herbe aujourd'hui et toujours,
Son esprit divague jusqu'aux lueurs du jour,
Quand s'éveille le coq là-bas dans le lointain,
Que le jardin attend l'étoile du matin.

Traduction ©2007 Laurent Chiacchiérini


Haut de page

The Toadstool Wood

The Toadstool Wood is dark and mouldy,
 And has a ferny smell.
About the trees hangs something quiet
 And queer-like a spell.

Beneath the arching sprays of bramble
 Small creatures make their holes ;
Over the moss's close green velvet
 The stilted spider strolls.

The stalks of toadstools pale and slender
 That grow from that old log.
Bars they might be to imprison
 A prince turned to a frog.

There lives no mumbling witch nor wizard
 In this uncanny place,
Yet you might think you saw at twilight
 A little crafty face.

- James Reeves


 

Les Champignons

Le Bois aux Champignons est obscur et moisi ;
 Il sent bon la fougère.
Quelque chose d'étrange et de tranquille aussi
 Semble flotter dans l'air.

Sous la voute formée par les gerbes de ronces,
 De petits rongeurs creusent.
Sur le velours vert de la mousse on voit qui fonce
 L'araignée gambadeuse.

Des pieds de champignons, pâles et élancés,
 Ornent un tronc coupé,
Pareils à des barreaux qui emprisonneraient
 Un prince encrapaudé.

Ni sorcière ni mage entendu marmonner
 En ce lieu mystérieux,
Pourtant au crépuscule on croirait deviner
 Un visage ingénieux.

Traduction ©2007 Laurent Chiacchiérini


Haut de page

Seeds

A row of pearls
Delicate green
Cased in while velvet-
The broad bean.

Smallest of birds
Winged and brown,
Seed of the maple
Flutters down.

Cupped like an egg
Without a yolk,
Grows the acorn,
Seed of the oak.

Autumn the housewife
Now unlocks
Seeds of the poppy
In their spice-box.

Silver hair
From an old man's crown
Wind-stolen
Is thistledown.

- James Reeves


 

Graines

Perles en rang
D'un beau vert d'eau
Dans l'écrin blanc
Du haricot.

Infime oiseau,
Impondérable,
Tu viens d'en haut,
Graine d'érable.

Œuf à la coque,
Le gland du chêne,
Dur comme un roc,
N'est qu'une graine.

Grains de pavot
Qu'elle libère
Sur ses gâteaux,
La cuisinière.

Cheveux d'argent
D'un vieux barbon
Pris par le vent,
C'est le chardon.

Traduction ©2007 Laurent Chiacchiérini


Haut de page

Trees in the Moonlight

Trees in the moonlight stand
 Still as a steeple,
And so quiet they seem like ghosts
 Of country people-

Dead farmers and their wives
 Of long, long ago,
Haunting the countryside
 They used to know;

Old gossips and talkers
 With tongues gone still;
Ploughmen rooted in the land
 They used to till;

Old carters and harvesters,
 Their wheels long rotten;
Old maids whose very names
 Time has forgotten.

Ghosts are they hereabouts;
 Them the moon sees,
Dark and still in the fields
 Like sleeping trees.

Long nights in autumn
 Hear them strain and cry,
Totn with a wordless sorrow
 As the gale sweeps by.

Spring makes fresh buds appear
 On the old boughs,
As if it could to their old wishes
 These ghosts arouse.

Trees in the summer night
 By moonlight linger on
So quiet they seem like ghosts
 Of people gone.

And it would be small wonder
 If at break of day
They heard the far-off cock-crow
 And fled away.

- James Reeves


 

Arbres sous la lune

Les arbres sous la lune comme
 De grands gisants
Debout évoquent des fantômes
 De paysans.

Fermiers défunts et leurs compagnes
 Du temps passé,
Hantant aujourd'hui la campagne
 Qu'ils connaissaient.

Commérages d'après-dîner
 Tus à jamais ;
Des laboureurs enracinés
 Aux champs de blé.

Des moissonneurs, des charretiers,
 Aux roues pourries ;
Des servantes au nom entier
 Chu dans l'oubli.

Veillant ces fantômes dans l'ombre,
 La lune luit
Sur ces arbres calmes et sombres,
 Comme endormis.

Durant les longues nuits d'automne,
 Leurs craquements
Tel un chagrin sans mots résonnent
 Au gré du vent.

Au printemps de nouveaux bourgeons
 Soudain éclosent,
Comme si leurs vieilles passions
 En étaient cause.

Ces arbres dans la nuit d'été
 Au clair de lune
Rappellent ceux qui ont été
 Quelqu'un, quelqu'une.

Il ne serait guère étonnant
 Qu'au point du jour
Le coq les fasse par son chant
 Fuir pour toujours.

Traduction ©2007 Laurent Chiacchiérini


Haut de page

The Grasshopper and the Bird

The grasshopper said
To the bird in the tree
 Zik-a-zik zik-a-zik
As polite as could be-
 Zik-a-zik zik-a-zik-
Which he meant for to say
In his grasshopper way
For the time of the year
'Twas a vairy warm day-
 Zik-a-zik zik-a-zik-
What a very warm day!

 Tee-oo-ee tee-oo-ee
Said the bird in the tree,
 Tee-oo-ee tee-oo-ee
As polite as could be;
That's as much as to say-
 Tee-oo-ee tee-oo-ee
That I can't quite agree!
So he upped with his wings-
 Tee-oo-ee tee-oo-ee
And he flew from the tree.

So the grasshopper hopped
Four hops and away
  Snick!
    Click!
      Flick!
        Slick!
Four hops and away
To the edge of the hay
 Zik-a-zik zik-a-zik
For the rest of the day.

 Zik-a-zik zik-a-zik
 Tee-oo-ee tee-oo-ee
The bird and the grasshopper
Can't quite agree.

- James Reeves


 

Le criquet et l'oiseau

Un criquet en musique
À un oiseau parlait,
 Tsic, tsic, tsic,
Poli comme un galet,
 Tsic, tsic, tsic,
Pour dire à sa façon,
La façon d'un criquet,
Que pour cette saison
Le temps n'était pas frais,
 Tsic, tsic, tsic,
Quelle chaude journée !

 Tui, tui, tui,
L'oiseau s'égosillait,
 Tui, tui, tui,
Poli comme un galet.
Je suis au grand regret,
 Tui, tui, tui,
De ne point acquiescer !
Et déployant ses ailes
 Tui, tui, tui,
Il fila dans le ciel.

Et le criquet sauta,
Quatre bonds puis s'en va,
  Snic !
    Clic !
      Plic !
        Slic !
Quatre bonds pour aller
À l'autre bout du pré,
 Tsic, tsic, tsic,
Y finir la journée.

 Tsic, tsic, tsic,
 Tui, tui, tui,
L'oiseau et le criquet
Ne sauraient s'accorder.

Traduction ©2007 Laurent Chiacchiérini


Haut de page

Uriconium

There was a man of Uriconium
Who played a primitive harmonium,
Inventing, to relieve his tedium,
Melodies high, low, and medium,
And standing on his Roman cranium
Amidst a bed of wild geranium,
Better known as pelargonium,
Since with odium his harmonium
Was received in Uriconium.

- James Reeves


 

Uriconium

Un homme âgé d'Uriconium
Jouait sur un vieil harmonium,
Perché au sommet d'un podium.
Notes aiguës, graves, médiums,
Comme au sein d'un auditorium,
Près d'un massif de géraniums,
Qu'on nomme aussi pélargoniums.
Dommage que son harmonium
N'eut l'hommage d'Uriconium.

Traduction ©2007 Laurent Chiacchiérini


Haut de page

Troy

Priam is the king of ashes.
 Heroes die and gods lament.
Round his head his kingdom crashes.
 Now the ten years' war is spent.

Night in flames and no man sleeping,
 Trumpets' scream across the plains,
Charging horsemen, women weeping-
 These are all that now remains:

These and not the shouts of gladness,
 Not the victors' face of joy,
These I see and hear in sadness
 When I think of fallen Troy.

- James Reeves


 

Troie

Priam n'est que le roi des cendres.
 Les héros morts, les dieux en pleurs.
Son monde autour de lui s'effondre.
 Dix ans de guerre et de douleur.

Nuit en flammes et gens en armes,
 Trompes au son assourdissant,
Chevaux chargeant, femmes en larmes :
 C'est tout ce qui reste à présent.

Ce ne sont point cris d'allégresse
 Ni les vainqueurs ivres de joie,
Mais des images de tristesse
 Qu'évoque la chute de Troie.

Traduction ©2007 Laurent Chiacchiérini


Haut de page

The Magic Seeds

There was an old woman who sowed a corn seed
And from it there sprouted a tall yellow weed.
She planted the seeds of the tall yellow flower,
And up sprang a blue one in less than an hour,
The seeds of the blue one she sowed in a bed,
And up sprang a tall tree with blossoms of red.
And high in the tree top there sang a white bird
And his song was the sweetest that ever was heard.
The people they came from far and from near,
The song of the little white bird to hear.

- James Reeves


 

Graines magiques

Une vieille une fois sema un grain de blé
Et il en jaillit un long épi tout doré.
Elle planta les graines de la jaune fleur
Et en vit surgir une bleue en moins d'une heure.
Les graines de la bleue semées dans un massif
Firent naître un grand arbre aux bouquets rouge vif.
Au sommet de cet arbre était un oiseau blanc
Dont le chant offrait un son sans équivalent.
Les gens vinrent alors de tous les horizons
Pour écouter le chant de ce blanc oisillon.

Traduction ©2007 Laurent Chiacchiérini


Haut de page

Birds in the Forest

Birds in the forest sing
 Of meadows green;
They sing of primrose banks
 With pools between.

Birds of the forest sing
 Of gardens bright;
They sing of scented flowers
 That haunt the night.

Birds in the forest sing
 Of falling water,
Falling like the hair
 Of a king's daughter.

Birds in the forest sing
 Of foreign lands;
They sing of hills beyond
 The foamy sands.

They sing of a far mountain
 Topped by a town
Where sits a grey wizard
 In a gold crown.

The songs the wild birds sing
 In forests tall,
It was the old grey wizard
 Taught them all.

- James Reeves


 

Les oiseaux des bois

Les oiseaux des bois chantent
 De grands prés verts ;
Les couleurs éclatantes
 Des primevères.

Les oiseaux des bois chantent
 De beaux jardins
Et leurs fleurs odorantes
 Jusqu'au matin.

Les oiseaux des bois chantent
 La pluie sans cesse ;
Chevelure tombante
 D'une princesse.

Les oiseaux des bois chantent
 D'autres pays ;
Des collines distantes
 De sable gris.

Chantant un mont lointain
 Coiffé d'un fort
Où vit un magicien
 Couronné d'or.

Les chants de ces oiseaux
 Dans la forêt,
Le vieux mage là-haut
 Leur a montrés.

Traduction ©2007 Laurent Chiacchiérini


Haut de page

The Statue

On a stone chair in the market-place
Sits a stone gentleman with a stone face.
He is great, he is good, he is old as old-
How many years I have not been told.
Great things he did a great while ago,
And what they were I do not know.
But solemn and sad is his great square face
As he sits high up on his square stone base.
Day after day he sits just so,
With some words in a foreign tongue below.
Whether the wind blows warm or cold,
His stone cloth alter never a fold.
One stone hand he rests on his knee;
With the other stone hand he points at me.
Oh, why does he look at me just that way?
I am afraid to go, and afraid to stay.
Stone gentleman, what have you got to say?

- James Reeves


 

La statue

Sur un siège de pierre au milieu de la place
Trône un monsieur de pierre au visage de glace.
Il est vieux comme Hérode, il est grand, il est sage...
Je n'ai aucune idée quel peut être son âge.
On dit qu'il aurait fait quelque chose de bien,
Il y a bien longtemps mais quoi, je n'en sais rien.
Mais solennelle et triste est sa figure fière
Qui nous contemple en haut de son socle de pierre.
Il reste assis ainsi, matin après matin,
Sur ce socle gravé d'une phrase en latin.
Que le vent souffle chaud ou bien qu'il souffle froid,
Son habit de pierre reste toujours bien droit.
Une main de pierre posée sur le genou,
Il pointe son autre main de pierre vers nous.
Pourquoi s'obstine-t-il à me dévisager ?
J'ai peur de rester mais je n'ose pas bouger.
Toi, l'homme pétrifié, qu'as-tu à déclarer ?

Traduction ©2007 Laurent Chiacchiérini


Haut de page

The Fiddler

The blind man lifts his violin
And tucks it up right under his chin;
He saws with his fiddle-stick to and fro
And out comes the music sorrowful slow.

 Oh Shenandoah, it seems to say,
  Good-bye, you rolling river;
 To Londonderry I'm away
  Beside the weeping willow.

Ha'pennies and pennies he gets but few
As he fiddles his old tunes through and through;
But he nods and smiles as he scrapes away
And out comes the music sprightly and gay.

 To the Irish washerwoman dancing a jig
  In the land of Sweet Forever
 Over the hills goes Tom with his pig,
  And it's there we'll surely follow!

- James Reeves


 

Le violon

L'aveugle saisit son violon
Et le cale sous son menton ;
De son archet qui va et vient
Monte un air lent plein de chagrin.

 Il semble chanter au passant :
  Adieu, ma rivière en fureur ;
 Je vais à la ville en passant
  À côté du saule pleureur.

Il reçoit quelques maigres sous
Pour les vieilles chansons qu'il joue
Mais il s'escrime à prodiguer
Une musique alerte et gaie.

 Une lavandière d'Irlande
  Danse son pays verdoyant ;
 Tom mène ses porcs dans la lande
  Et nous le suivons en riant.

Traduction ©2007 Laurent Chiacchiérini


Haut de page

Mrs Button

When Mrs Button, of a morning,
 Comes creaking down the street,
You hear her old two black boots whisper
 'Poor feet- Poor feet- Poor feet!'

When Mrs Button, every Monday,
 Sweeps the chapel neat,
All down the long, hushed aisles they whisper
  'Poor feet- Poor feet- Poor feet!'

Mrs Button after dinner
 (It is her Sunday treat)
Sits down and takes her two black boots off
 And rests her two poor feet.

- James Reeves


 

Madame Bouton

Quand Madame Bouton, partie de bon matin,
 Se traîne dans la rue pour aller travailler,
L'on entend chacune de ses bottes qui geint :
 “Mes pauvres pieds, mes pauvres pieds, mes pauvres pieds !”

Quand Madame Bouton, chaque lundi matin,
 Passe tout son temps dans l'église à nettoyer,
Dans les allées chacun de ses souliers se plaint :
 “Mes pauvres pieds, mes pauvres pieds, mes pauvres pieds !”

Madame Bouton quand arrive enfin le soir
 (C'est là son unique plaisir de la journée)
S'asseoit pour enlever ses deux bottines noires
 Et laisser reposer ses deux malheureux pieds.

Traduction ©2008 Laurent Chiacchiérini


Haut de page

Time to go Home

Time to go home!
 Says the great steeple clock.
Time to go home!
 Says the gold weathercock.
Down sinks the sun
 In the valley to sleep;
Lost are the orchards
 In blue shadows deep.
Soft falls the dew
 On cornfield and grass;
Through the dark trees
 The evening airs pass;
Time to go home,
 They murmur and say;
Birds to their homes
 Have all flown away.
Nothing shines now
 But the gold weathercock.
Time to go home!
 Says the great steeple clock.

- James Reeves


 

L'heure de rentrer

C'est l'heure de rentrer !
 Dit l'horloge au clocher.
C'est l'heure de rentrer !
 Dit le coq haut perché.
Le soleil épuisé
 Descend dans la vallée.
On ne voit des vergers
 Que des ombres bleutées.
Doucement la rosée
 Se répand sur les blés.
Dans les arbres tout noirs
 Passe le vent du soir.
C'est l'heure de rentrer,
 Semble-il murmurer.
Les oiseaux vers leur nid
 Sont déjà tous partis.
On ne voit plus briller
 Que le coq du clocher.
C'est l'heure de rentrer !
 Dit l'horloge haut perchée.

Traduction ©2008 Laurent Chiacchiérini


Haut de page

The Horn

'Oh, hear you a horn, mother, behind the hill?
My body's blood runs bitter and chill.
The seven long years have passed, mother, passed,
And here comes my rider at last, at last.
I hear his horse now, and soon I must go.
How dark is the night, mother, cold the winds blow.
How fierce the hurricane over the deep sea!
For a seven years' promise he comes to take me.'

'Stay at home, daughter, stay here and hide.
I will say you have gone, I will tell him you died.
I am lonely without you, your father is old;
Warm is your heart, daughter, but the world is cold.'
'Oh mother, oh mother, you must not talk so.
In faith I promised, and for faith I must go,
For if that old promise I should not keep,
For seven years, mother, I would not sleep.

Seven years my blood would run bitter and chill
To hear that sad horn, mother, behind the hill.
My body once frozen by such a shame
Would never be warmed, mother, at our hearth's flame.
But round my true heart shall the arms of the storm
For ever be folded, protecting and warm.'

- James Reeves


 

Le cor

Oh ma mère, entends-tu le cor sur la colline ?
Je sens tout mon sang se glacer dans ma poitrine.
Ces sept longues années, oh ma mère, ont passé
Et voici revenir enfin mon fiancé.
Je l'entends chevaucher, bientôt partir je dois.
Comme noire est la nuit, comme le vent est froid.
Entends-tu la tempête agiter l'océan !
Il vient chercher celle promise il y a sept ans.”

“Reste ici, oh ma fille, abritée par la porte.
Je te dirai partie, je te prétendrai morte.
Ne m'abandonne pas, je suis seule sans toi ;
Ton cœur est chaud, ma fille, oui mais le monde est froid.”
“Oh ma mère, il ne faut pas parler de la sorte.
J'ai promis sur ma foi et il faut que je sorte.
Car si je venais à manquer à ma promesse,
Je crains que pour sept ans, mon sommeil disparaisse.

Sept ans durant mon sang glacerait ma poitrine
Au triste son du cor là-haut sur la colline.
Et mon corps une fois de honte ainsi figé
Ne saurait se chauffer au feu de ton foyer.
À jamais la tempête enserrera mon cœur
Entre ses bras puissants, chaleureux protecteurs.”

Traduction ©2008 Laurent Chiacchiérini


Haut de page

Little Minnie Mystery

Little Minnie Mystery has packets and parcels
 All tied about with laces and strings,
And all full of scraps and patches and morsels
 And oddments and pieces and bits of things.

All tied about with strings and laces,
 Are old Minnie Mystery's wonderful stores,
And she stows them away in all sorts of places-
 Cupboards and cases and chests of drawers.

All day long you will hear her caper
 From attic to basement, up and down stairs,
Rummaging and rustling with tissue paper
 And rattling keys and climbing on chairs.

What does she keep in her parcels and packets?-
 Why, buckles and beads and knobs and handles,
Playing-cards, curtain-rings, loops, and lockets,
 Letters and labels and Christmas-tree candles,

And a sea-shell box, and a peacock feather,
 And a picture postcard from Tonypandy-
Everything neat and fastened together,
 All that could possibly come in handy.

'Waste not, want not,' says Minnie Mystery.
 'Everything's sure to come in some day.'
So, although she should live till the end of history,
 Nothing she ever will throw away.

- James Reeves


 

Petite mère Mystère

La petite mère Mystère a des paquets
 Qui recèlent le plus varié des bric-à-brac,
Bien ficelés par des cordes et des lacets,
 Pleins de pièces, de bouts et de chutes en vrac.

La mère Mystère a d'étonnantes réserves,
 Bien ficelées par des cordes et des lacets,
Que dans toutes sortes d'endroits elle conserve :
 Dans des commodes, des malles et des buffets.

Du matin jusqu'au soir, on l'entend qui s'emploie,
 Montant et descendant de la cave au grenier,
Fouillant et farfouillant dans des papiers de soie,
 Grimpant sur des chaises et agitant ses clés.

Que peut-elle donc bien garder dans ses paquets ?
 Eh bien, des boucles, des bougies et des boutons,
Des anneaux de rideau, des cartes à jouer,
 Des étiquettes, des lettres et des festons,

Des coquillages et une plume de paon,
 Et une carte postée depuis Singapour,
Le tout bien attaché et rangé proprement,
 Car tout cela pourrait bien lui servir un jour.

“Épargner, c'est gagner”, dit la mère Mystère.
 “Tout finira par trouver son utilité.”
Aussi longtemps qu'elle vivra sur cette terre,
 Elle ne pourra se résoudre à rien jeter.

Traduction ©2008 Laurent Chiacchiérini


Haut de page

The Dizz

Oh, have you seen the beauteous Dizz
And heard his soft 'Biz-biz! biz-biz!'
And through the sumptious evening hour
He oscillates from flower to flower.
His long discerning nose can tell
The difference of smell to smell
As on his busy way he goes
From honeybunch to sugarose.

He has six wings, not all the same,
Two mauve, two emerald, two flame,
On which he trundles here and there
All in the sumptious summer air,
Or with his plushy wings spread wide
He does the gorgeous glitterglide,
Something between a dive and dance,
Which puts the watchers in a trance.
'It is,' they sigh, 'it is, it is
The ultraspecial, long-nosed dizz.

The Queen Dizz has no wings at all,
But sits at home in Honey Hall
Enjoying the galooshus things
Her ever-helpful helpmeet brings.
How fortunate if you should spy
So rare a creature in the sky
And hear the soft 'Biz-biz! biz-biz!'
Emitted by the beauteous Dizz.
Oh, how his six wings whirr and whizz!

- James Reeves


 

La dise

Avez-vous vu la belle dise
Et entendu son doux bzzz-bzzz ?
À la plus tardive des heures,
Elle oscille de fleur en fleur.
Son long nez des plus perspicaces
Reconnaît une odeur fugace
Quand en chemin elle se pose
De méliflore en saccharose.

Elle a six ailes différentes
Tantôt vertes, bleues, amarante,
Sur lesquelles elle prend appui
Pour se déplacer dans la nuit
Ou qu'elle déploie pour voler.
Elle exécute un vol plané,
Entre un plongeon et une danse,
Qui met les spectateurs en transe.
“C'est elle”, entend-on souffler,
“La dise spéciale au long nez.”

La reine dise n'a point d'ailes ;
Assise en son palais de miel,
Elle goûte aux succulents mets
Qu'apporte son zélé valet.
Heureux celui qui pourrait voir
Une créature aussi rare
Et entendre le doux bzzz-bzzz
Diffusé par la belle dise
Quand ses ailes fendent la bise !

Traduction ©2008 Laurent Chiacchiérini


Haut de page

Miss Wing

At the end of the street lives small Miss Wing,
A feathery, fluttery bird of a thing.
If you climb the street to the very top,
There you will see her fancy shop
With ribbons and buttons and frills and fluffs,
Pins and needles, purses and puffs,
Cosies and cushions and bits of chiffon,
And tiny hankies for ladies to sniff on,
And twists of silk and pieces of lace,
And odds and ends all over the place.
You push the door and the door-bell rings,
And the voice you hear is little Miss Wing's.
'Good-day, my dear, and how do you do?
Now tell me, what can I do for you?
Just half a second, please, dear Miss Gay-
As I was saying the other day-
Now what did I do with that so-and-so?
I'm sure I had it a moment ago-
As I was saying - why, yes, my dear-
A very nice day for the time of the year-
Have you heard how poor Mrs Such-and-such?-
Oh, I hope I haven't charged too much;
That would never do-Now, what about pink?
It's nice for children, I always think-
Some buttons to go with a lavender frock?
Why now, I believe I'm out of stock-
Well, what about these? Oh, I never knew-
I'm ever so sorry-Now, what about blue
Such a very nice woman-a flower for a hat?'
And so she goes on, with 'Fancy that!'
And 'You never can tell,' and 'Oh dear, no,'
And 'There now! It only goes to show.'
And on she goes like a hank of tape,
A reel of ribbon, a roll of crêpe
Till you think her tongue will never stop.

And that's Miss Wing of the fancy shop.

- James Reeves


 

Mamz'Ailes

Au bout de la rue vit la petite Mamz'Ailes,
Vieille demoiselle frêle comme une oiselle.
Si vous remontez tout en haut de cette rue,
Vous verrez sa boutique, à vos yeux apparue,
Pleine de rubans, de boutons, de fanfreluches,
D'aiguilles, d'épingles, de sacs et de peluches,
De coussins moelleux et de tissus surannés,
Et de petits mouchoirs pour y mettre son nez,
De tortillons de soie, de pièces de dentelle
Et tout un bric-à-brac guettant la clientèle.
Dès la porte franchie, sa voix vous interpelle ;
La sonnette sonnée, vous n'entendez plus qu'elle.
“Bonjour, ma chère amie, et comment allez-vous ?
Dites-moi, je vous prie, que puis-je donc pour vous ?
Un moment, s'il vous plaît, Madame Éléonore -
Comme je le disais l'autre semaine encore -
Où ai-je donc posé ce satané machin ?
Il y a juste un instant, je l'avais dans les mains -
Comme je le disais - oui, vous avez raison -
Quel beau temps aujourd'hui, et chaud pour la saison -
Savez-vous pour cette pauvre Madame Untel ? -
Ne vous ai-je compté trop pour cette dentelle ?
Cela serait gênant - Que diriez-vous de rose ?
Parfait pour des enfants, du moins je le suppose -
Voulez-vous des boutons pour votre robe à fleurs ?
Oh, mais je n'en ai plus en stock, j'en ai bien peur -
Et ceux-ci, dites-moi ? Je fais ce que je peux...
Vous m'en voyez navrée - Que diriez-vous de bleu ?
Une si chère amie - Des fleurs pour un chapeau ?”
Et d'ajouter encore : “En croiriez-vous un mot !”
Et “Ma chère, il ne faut jamais jurer de rien”
Et “Moi, je vous le dis, tout cela prouve bien...”
Et sans fin elle dévide son boniment
À la façon d'une bobine de ruban,
À croire que sa langue au grand jamais n'abdique.

Car telle est cette oiselle au fond de sa boutique.

Traduction ©2008 Laurent Chiacchiérini


Haut de page

Boating

Gently the river bore us
 Beneath the morning sky,
Singing, singing, singing
Its reedy, quiet tune
 As we went boating by;
And all that afternoon
 In our small boat we lay
Rocking, rocking, rocking
 Under the willows grey.
When into bed that evening
 I climbed, it seemed a boat
Was softly rocking, rocking,
Rocking me to sleep,
 And I was still afloat.
I heard the grey leaves weep
 And whisper round my bed,
The river singing, singing,
 Singing through my head.

- James Reeves


 

En barque

L'onde nous va portant
 Sous le ciel du matin,
Chantant, chantant, chantant
Son air calme et serein ;
 Puis tout l'après-midi,
Nous allons naviguant,
 Dans la barque blottis,
Tanguant, tanguant, tanguant
 Sous les saules tout gris.
Et quand, le soir venant,
 J'embarque dans mon lit,
Doucement je m'endors,
Tanguant, tanguant, tanguant,
 Comme flottant encore.
Les saules vont pleurant
 Tout autour de mon lit ;
L'eau va chantant, chantant,
 Chantant dans mon esprit.

Traduction ©2008 Laurent Chiacchiérini


Haut de page

The Piano

There is a lady who plays a piano;
 She lets me listen if I keep still.
I love to watch her twinkling fingers
 Fly up and down in scale or trill.

I love to hear the great chords crashing
 And making the huge black monster roar;
I love to hear the little chords falling
 Like sleepy waves on a summer shore.

Here comes an army with drums and trumpets,
 Now it's a battlefield, now it's a fire;
Now it's a waterfall boiling and bubbling,
 Now it's a bird singing higher and higher.

Now in the moonlight watch the trees bending,
 Water-nymphs rise from the bed of a stream;
Now in the garden the fountains are playing
 And in the sunshine flowers sway and dream.

Sometimes Harlequin comes with sweet Columbine,
 Sometimes I see deserts and twinkling stars,
The goose-girl, the fairies, a giant, a pygmy,
 And dark muffled strangers in foreign bazaars....

All these I see when I hear that piano,
 All these and many things more do I see,
While over the keyboard the lady's hands travel,
 Yet nothing she sings, and no word says she.

- James Reeves


 

Le piano

Il y a une dame qui joue sur un piano
 Et me laisse écouter si je me tiens tranquille.
J'aime observer ses doigts courir tel un moineau,
 Survolant le clavier comme un oiseau agile.

J'aime entendre craquer les grands accords majeurs,
 Faisant soudain rugir l'énorme monstre noir ;
J'aime entendre pleuvoir les beaux accords mineurs
 En vagues assoupies sur des plages d'ivoire.

Voici toute une armée, ses tambours, ses trompettes ;
 C'est un champ de bataille, un déluge de feu ;
C'est une chute d'eau bouillonnant dans ma tête,
 C'est un oiseau chantant bien plus haut que les cieux.

Sous la lune voyez les arbres qui se penchent ;
 Des Naïades nées du lit d'un torrent se lèvent ;
Tout au fond du jardin des fontaines s'épanchent
 Et au soleil des fleurs se balancent et rêvent.

Quelquefois Harlequin vient avec Colombine
 Et je vois des déserts et des cieux étoilés,
Et la gardeuse d'oies, et la fée Mélusine,
 D'exotiques bazars aux couleurs bariolées.

C'est tout que j'entends et tout ce que je vois,
 Tout ce que m'évoque le son de ce piano,
Pendant que cette dame y fait courir ses doigts,
 Tout cela sans chanter, sans même dire un mot.

Traduction ©2008 Laurent Chiacchiérini


Haut de page

The Street Musician

With plaintive fluting, sad and slow,
 The old man by the woodside stands.
Who would have thought such notes could flow
 From such cracked lips and withered hands?

On shivering legs he stoops and sways,
 And not a passer stops to hark;
No penny cheers him as he plays;
 About his feet the mongrels bark.

But piping through the bitter weather,
 He lets the world go on its way.
Old piper! Let us go together,
 And I will sing and you shall play.

- James Reeves


 

Musicien des rues

Jouant un air plaintif et lent,
 Le vieux se tient sur la chaussée.
Qui croirait ces notes coulant
  De lèvres et de mains gercées ?

Ses grêles jambes se balancent
 Mais aucun passant ne le voit ;
Aucune pièce en récompense
 Et à ses pieds les chiens aboient.

Mais il joue par ce temps de chien,
 Laissant chacun suivre sa voie.
Viens avec moi, vieux musicien,
 Je chanterai et tu joueras.

Traduction ©2008 Laurent Chiacchiérini


Haut de page

Rum Lane

Gusty and chill
 Blows the wind in Rum Lane
And the spouts are a-spill
 With the fast-driving rain.

No footfall, no sound!
 Not a cat slithers by.
Men of sense, I'll be bound,
 Are at home in the dry.

Tall, dark, and narrow
 Are houses and shops-
Scarce room for a sparrow
 Between the roof-tops.

But oh! What a history
 Of rum and romance
Could be made from the mystery
 Of old Rum Lane once-

For this was the place
 Where they stowed silk apparel,
Old wine and old lace,
 And rum in the barrel!

Gusty and chill
 Blows the wind in Rum Lane
And the spouts are a-spill
 With the fast-driving rain.

But no footfall, no tread,
 No step on the cobble
Will fright you in bed,
 You can sleep free of trouble;

For smuggling is over,
 And never again
Will any wild rover
 Be caught in Rum Lane.

- James Reeves


 

Allée du Rhum

Le vent cinglant et froid
 Balaie l'Allée du Rhum ;
Par jets la pluie s'abat,
 Bat comme un métronome.

Pas un pas, le silence !
 Pas un chat en ces lieux.
Les hommes de bon sens
 Sont bien au chaud chez eux.

Des maisons si serrées,
 Hautes, minces et sombres,
Qu'un moineau ne pourrait
 Même y glisser son ombre.

Ah ! Quelle belle histoire
 De rhum et de roman
Pourrait nous faire voir
 L'Allée du Rhum d'antan...

Car c'était là l'endroit
 Où venaient d'Amérique
La dentelle, la soie
 Et le rhum en barrique !

Le vent cinglant et froid
 Balaie l'Allée du Rhum ;
Par jets la pluie s'abat,
 Bat comme un métronome.

Pas un pas, pas un bruit
 Pour troubler le sommeil
De celui qui au lit
 Dort sur ses deux oreilles.

Finie la contrebande :
 Plus jamais un seul homme
Ne verra une bande
 Hantant l'Allée du Rhum.

Traduction ©2008 Laurent Chiacchiérini


Haut de page

Pat’s Fiddle

When Pat plays his fiddle
 In the great empty hall,
And the flame of each candle
 Is shiny and small,
  Then to hear the brave jingle,
  Oh, how my feet tingle
And how I do wish we could have a fine ball!

  Like a riddle, like a riddle
   Without any answer,
  Is a fiddle, sweet fiddle,
   Without never a dancer.

Then out of the shadows
 And down the dark stairs
Come the ghosts of bright ladies
 And tall cavaliers.
  Oh, see with what pleasure
  They step out the measure!
His heart is as gay as the colour she wears.

  Like a riddle, like a riddle
   Without any answer,
  Is a fiddle, sweet fiddle,
   Without never a dancer.

 I hear from each partner
  Who passes me by
 The faintest of whispers,
  The ghost of a sigh.
  For there'll be no hiding
  The pain of dividing
When the strains of the fiddle shall falter and die.

  Like a riddle, like a riddle
   Without any answer,
  Is a fiddle, sweet fiddle,
   Without never a dancer.

So play no more, Paddy,
 Of fiddlers the best.
The spent candles bid us
 Good-night and good rest.
   When music entrancing
    Sets both my feet dancing,
There's something inside me that can't be expressed.
   Now rest your old fingers
   While darkness yet lingers,
For yonder has vanished the last ghostly guest.

- James Reeves


 

Pat et son violon

Quand Pat joue du violon
 Dans cette immense salle
Pleine de lumignons
 Aux flammes minimales,
  Au son de sa musique,
  J'ai les pieds qui me piquent :
Comme je souhaiterais que l'on y tienne un bal !

 Tout comme une question
  Sans aucune réponse,
 J'écoute ce violon
  Sans personne qui danse.

Alors sortent du noir,
 Descendant l'escalier,
Les fantômes du soir
 Avec leurs cavaliers.
  Ah, quelle démesure
  Pour battre la mesure !
La gaieté dans leur cœur, l'éclat de leurs souliers.

 Tout comme une question
  Sans aucune réponse,
 J'écoute ce violon
  Sans personne qui danse.

 Des couples qui me frôlent
  Provient à peine un son,
 Pas même une parole,
  D'un soupir le soupçon.
  Car il leur faudra bien
  Se séparer enfin
Quand les sons du violon doucement s'éteindront.

 Tout comme une question
  Sans aucune réponse,
 J'écoute ce violon
  Sans personne qui danse.

Mieux vaut que tu t'arrêtes,
 Toi, le roi de l'archet.
Les chandelles nous souhaitent
 Une bonne nuitée.
   Quand ta musique gaie
   Entraîne mes deux pieds,
Naît quelque chose en moi qui ne peut s'exprimer.
   Repose tes vieux doigts
   Dans la nuit qui s'en va,
Car au loin disparaît le dernier invité.

Traduction ©2008 Laurent Chiacchiérini


Haut de page

My Singing Aunt

The voice of magic melody
 With which my aunt delights me,
It drove my uncle to the grave
 And now his ghost affrights me.
This was the song she used to sing
 When I could scarcely prattle,
And as her top notes rose and fell
 They made the sideboard rattle:

'What makes a lady's cheeks so red,
 Her hair both long and wavy?
'Tis eating up her crusts of bread,
 Likewise her greens and gravy.
What makes the sailor rough and gay?
 What makes the ploughboy whistle?
'Tis eating salt-beef twice a day,
 And never mind the gristle.'

Thus sang my aunt in days gone by
 To soothe, caress, and calm me;
But what delighted me so much
 Drove her poor husband barmy.
So now when past the church I stray,
 'Tis not the night-wind moaning,
That chills my blood and stops my breath,
 But poor uncle's groaning.

- James Reeves


 

Ma tante chantante

Tout en m'enchantant au berceau,
 La voix magique de ma tante
A conduit tonton au tombeau ;
 Depuis son fantôme me hante.
C'est la berceuse qu'elle chante,
 Depuis qu'à peine je parlais,
La voix montante et descendante
 Au point que le buffet tremblait :

“Qu'est-ce qui fait rougir les dames,
 Aux cheveux longs et ondulés ?
C'est de dévorer de l'édam,
 Avec de la soupe et du lait.
Qu'est-ce qui rend le marin gai
 Et fait siffler le laboureur ?
C'est de manger du bœuf salé,
 Avec du potage et du beurre.”

C'était là sa chanson d'antan
 Pour me calmer dans mon berceau ;
Mais ce que j'aimais tant et tant
 A rendu mon tonton marteau.
Quand je longe le cimetière,
 Ce n'est point le vent mugissant
Qui glace mon sang dans ma chair,
 Mais mon pauvre oncle gémissant.

Traduction ©2008 Laurent Chiacchiérini


Haut de page

Mrs Golightly

Mrs Golightly's goloshes
 Are roomy and large;
Through water she slithers and sloshes,
 As safe as a barge.

When others at home must be stopping,
 To market she goes,
And returns later on with her shopping
 Tucked into her toes.

- James Reeves


 

Madame Pasléger

Madame Pasléger porte des caoutchoucs
 Spacieux et riches,
Que l'on voit patauger à travers la gadoue,
 Sûres péniches.

Pendant que d'autres sont coincés à la maison,
 C'est du marché
Qu'elle s'en retourne en charriant des provisions
 Sur ses deux pieds.

Traduction ©2008 Laurent Chiacchiérini


Haut de page

Poor Rumble

Pity poor Rumble: he is growing wheezy.
 At seventy-nine years old
His breath comes hard, and nothing comes too easy.
 He finds the evenings cold.

Pity poor Rumble: winter on his noddle
 Has laid its wisps of snow;
And though about the place he scarce can toddle,
 He likes to work, I know.

Pity poor Rumble: his last teeth are rotting
 Back in his square old head;
And yet, come Whitsuntide, you'll find him potting
 Down in his potting-shed.

Pity poor Rumble: since the time of Noah
 There was in all the county
For rose, or root, or greens no better grower-
 It was sheer bounty.

He was the champion for fruit or tatey;
 But Rumble's famous marrow,
So huge it was and more than common weighty,
 It almost split his barrow.

Of cat and dog he was the holy terror-
 None ever plagued him twice;
And if a slug walked on his lawn in error,
 His language was not nice.

Pity poor Rumble: now his strength are going.
 No more he'll cut up wood.
I wish I had some peaches of his growing;
 They were so very good.

Sing, birds of the air, for Martin Rumble, please.
 When he is gone away,
Who will grow strawberries for you, green peas,
 And currants on the spray?

- James Reeves


 

Père Grondin

Pauvre père Grondin : il siffle en respirant.
 Presqu'à quatre-vingts ans,
Il a le souffle court, plus rien n'est comme avant.
 Le soir glace son sang.

Pauvre père Grondin : l'hiver sur ses cheveux
 A mis des mèches blanches
Mais lui qui aujourd'hui se traîne comme un vieux
 A du pain sur la planche.

Pauvre père Grondin : il n'a plus qu'une dent
 Qui n'est qu'une carie ;
Mais, dès la Pentecôte, on le voit rempotant
 Au fond de son abri.

Pauvre père Grondin : dans toute la région,
 Jamais l'on n'a connu
Un autre jardinier qui pour ses plantations
 Fut tant porté aux nues.

C'était le roi des fruits et des pommes de terre
 Mais surtout des courgettes,
Si grosses et lourdes qu'elles manquaient de faire
 S'effondrer sa brouette.

Les chats comme les chiens, l'ayant en sainte horreur,
 N'osaient point le troubler
Et si une limace approchait par erreur,
 Il savait lui parler.

Pauvre père Grondin : ses forces s'amenuisent ;
 Plus question de bêcher.
J'aurais aimé goûter quelques pêches exquises
 Cueillies dans son verger.

Chantez, oiseaux du ciel, pour le père Grondin.
 Du jour qu'il s'en ira,
Qui vous fera pousser des fraises du jardin,
 Des cassis et des pois ?

Traduction ©2008 Laurent Chiacchiérini


Haut de page

The Three Singing Birds

The King walked in his garden green
 Where grew a marvellous tree ;
And out of its leaves came singing birds
 By one, and two, and three.

The first bird had wings of white,
 The second had wings of gold.
The third had wings of deepest blue
 Most beauteous to behold.

The white bird flew to the northern land,
 The gold bird flew to the west,
The blue bird flew to the cold, cold south
 Where never bird might nest.

The King waited a twelwemonth long,
 Till back the three birds flew,
They lighted down upon the tree,
 The white, the gold and the blue.

The white bird brought a pearly seed
 And gave it to the King ;
The gold bird from out of the west
 He brought a golden ring.

The third bird with feathers blue
 Who came from the far cold south,
A twisted see-shell smooth and grey
 He carried in his mouth.

The King planted the pearly seed
 Down in his garden green,
And up there sprang a pearl-white maid,
 The fairest ever seen.

She looked at the King and knelt her down
 All under the magic tree,
She smiled at him with her red lips
 But not a word said she.

Instead she took the grey sea-shell
 And held it to his ear,
She pressed it close and soon the King
A strange, sweet song did hear.

He raised the fair maid by the hand
 Until she stood at this side ;
Then he gave her the golden ring
 And took her for his bride.

And at their window sang the birds,
 They sang the whole night through,
Then off they went at break of day,
 The white, the gold, and the blue.

- James Reeves


 

Trois oiseaux chanteurs

Il poussait un arbre enchanteur
 Dans les jardins du Roi ;
Il donna des oiseaux chanteurs :
 Pas un, pas deux, mais trois.

L'un possédait des ailes blanches,
 L'autre était tout doré
Et le troisième bleu pervenche,
 Très beau à admirer.

Vers le nord vola l'oiseau pâle,
 L'oiseau d'or vers l'ouest,
Et le bleu vers le sud glacial
 Où nul oiseau ne reste.

Le Roi douze mois sans rien faire
 Attendit après eux.
En haut de l'arbre ils se posèrent,
 Le blanc, l'or et le bleu.

L'oiseau blanc rapporta du nord
 Une graine nacrée
Et de l'occident l'oiseau d'or,
 Une bague dorée.

Le troisième bleu de plumage,
 Qui du sud revenait,
Ramenait un beau coquillage
 Qu'en son bec il tenait.

Le Roi planta la blanche graine
 Au fond de son jardin
Et il en jaillit une reine,
 Blanche comme du pain.

S'agenouillant devant le Roi,
 Dessous l'arbre aux oiseaux.
Elle sourit, pleine de joie,
 Mais ne dit pas un mot.

Elle prit la coque magique
 Et lui mit à l'oreille ;
Il entendit une musique
 À nulle autre pareille.

Le Roi, la prenant par la main,
 La fit se redresser
Et, lui donnant l'anneau d'airain,
 En fit sa fiancée.

Les trois oiseaux à leur fenêtre
 Chantèrent pour eux deux,
Avant enfin de disparaître,
 Le blanc, l'or et le bleu.

Traduction ©2008 Laurent Chiacchiérini


Haut de page

The Ceremonial Band

   The old King of Dorchester,
   He had a little orchestra,
And never did you hear such a ceremonial band.
   'Tootle-too,' said the flute,
   'Deed-a-reedle, said the fiddle,
For the fiddles and the flutes were the finest in the land.

   The old King of Dorchester,
   He had a little orchestra,
And never did you hear such a ceremonial band.
   'Pump-a-rum,', said the drum,
   'Tootle-too,' said the flute,
   'Deed-a-reedle, said the fiddle,
For the fiddles and the flutes were the finest in the land.

   The old King of Dorchester,
   He had a little orchestra,
And never did you hear such a ceremonial band.
   'Pickle-pee,', said the fife,
   'Pump-a-rum,', said the drum,
   'Tootle-too,' said the flute,
   'Deed-a-reedle, said the fiddle,
For the fiddles and the flutes were the finest in the land.

   The old King of Dorchester,
   He had a little orchestra,
And never did you hear such a ceremonial band.
   'Zoomba-zoom', said the bass,
   'Pickle-pee,', said the fife,
   'Pump-a-rum,', said the drum,
   'Tootle-too,' said the flute,
   'Deed-a-reedle, said the fiddle,
For the fiddles and the flutes were the finest in the land.

   The old King of Dorchester,
   He had a little orchestra,
And never did you hear such a ceremonial band.
   'Pah-pa-rah', said the trumpet,
   'Zoomba-zoom', said the bass,
   'Pickle-pee,', said the fife,
   'Pump-a-rum,', said the drum,
   'Tootle-too,' said the flute,
   'Deed-a-reedle, said the fiddle,
For the fiddles and the flutes were the finest in the land.
Oh! the fiddles and the flutes were the finest in the land.

- James Reeves


 

La fanfare

   Il était un bourgmestre
   Qui avait un orchestre :
Jamais l'on entendit de plus belle fanfare.
   “Tut tut”, faisait la flûte,
   Et “lon lon” le violon,
Car les cordes et vents étaient les plus fêtards.

   Il était un bourgmestre
   Qui avait un orchestre :
Jamais l'on entendit de plus belle fanfare.
   “Boum”, faisait le tambour,
   Et “Tut tut tut” la flûte,
   Et “lon lon” le violon,
Car les cordes et vents étaient les plus fêtards.

   Il était un bourgmestre
   Qui avait un orchestre :
Jamais l'on entendit de plus belle fanfare.
   “Fi fi”, faisait le fifre,
   Et “boum boum” le tambour,
   Et “tut tut tut” la flûte,
   Et “lon lon” le violon,
Car les cordes et vents étaient les plus fêtards.

   Il était un bourgmestre
   Qui avait un orchestre :
Jamais l'on entendit de plus belle fanfare.
   “Zon zon”, faisait la basse,
   Et “fi fi fi” le fifre,
   Et “boum boum” le tambour,
   Et “tut tut tut” la flûte,
   Et “lon lon” le violon,
Car les cordes et vents étaient les plus fêtards.

   Il était un bourgmestre
   Qui avait un orchestre :
Jamais l'on entendit de plus belle fanfare.
   “Ta la”, faisait la trompette,
   Et “zon zon zon” la basse,
   Et “fi fi fi” le fifre,
   Et “boum boum” le tambour,
   Et “tut tut tut” la flûte,
   Et “lon lon” le violon,
Car les cordes et vents étaient les plus fêtards.
Oui, les cordes et vents étaient les plus fêtards.

Traduction ©2008 Laurent Chiacchiérini


Haut de page

Diddling

 The people of Diddling
 Are never more than middling
For they can't abide either cold or heat.
 If the weather is damp,
 It gives them cramp,
And a touch of frost goes straight to their feet.

 A thundery shower
 Turns everything sour,
And a dry spell ruins the farmers' crops,
 And a south-west wind
 Is nobody's friend
For it blows the smoke down the chimney-tops.

 Says old Mrs Morley,
 'I'm middling poorly,
But, thank you, I was never one to complain;
 For the cold in my nose
 As soon as it goes
I dursn't but say I may get it again.'

 Old Grandfather Snell
 Has never been well
Since he took to his crutches at seventy-three;
 And the elder Miss Lake
 Has a travelling ache
Which find its way down from her neck to her knee.

 The people of Diddling
 Are never more than middling-
Not one but has headaches or palsy or gout.
 But what they fear worst
 Is a fine sunny burst,
For then there'll be nothing to grumble about.

- James Reeves


 

Toutourien

 Les gens de Toutourien
 Sont rien que très moyens,
Eux qui ne supportent ni juillet ni décembre.
 Quand le temps est humide,
 Il leur donne des rides,
Et la moindre gelée leur descend dans les membres.

 Une averse d'orage
 Fait gâter les fourrages
Mais un manque de pluie pourrait bien les ruiner.
 Le vent du sud-ouest
 Est craint comme la peste
Car il fait tomber la fumée des cheminées.

 Comme dit Mère Armand,
 “Je vais moyennement
Mais, merci, je ne suis pas du genre à me plaindre.
 Le rhume dans mon nez
 Me revient chaque année
Et à peine parti son retour est à craindre.”

 Le vieux père Machin
 N'a jamais été bien
Depuis qu'il a passé ses soixante-treize ans.
 La pauvre mère Empleur
 Se plaint d'une douleur
Qui du cou au genou voyage dans son sang.

 Les gens de Toutourien
 Sont rien que très moyens,
Souffrant de maux de tête ou de goutte ou bien pire.
 Mais tout ce qu'ils redoutent,
 C'est une journée d'août
À laquelle ils ne trouveraient rien à redire.

Traduction ©2008 Laurent Chiacchiérini


Haut de page

Bobadil

Far from far
 Lives Bobadil
In a tall house
 On a tall hill.

Out from the high
 Top window-sill
On a clear night
 Leans Bobadil

To touch the moon,
 To catch a star,
To keep in her tall house
 Far from far.

- James Reeves


 

Bobadil

Sur un grand mont,
 Loin de la ville,
Dans sa maison
 Vit Bobadil.

Sur la hauteur,
 À sa fenêtre,
Dans la moiteur,
 Qu'il fait bon être.

Toucher la lune,
 Prendre une étoile,
En garder une
 Dans un bocal.

Traduction ©2008 Laurent Chiacchiérini


Haut de page

Mrs Gilfillan

When Mrs Gilfillan
 Is troubled with troubles,
She flies to the kitchen
 And sits blowing bubbles.
When Mrs Gilfillan
 Is worried by money,
When her feet are like lead
 And her head's feeling funny,
When there's too much to do,
 And the chimney is smoking,
And everything's awkward
 And wrong and provoking,
When the washing won't dry
 For the rain's never ending,
When the cupboards need cleaning
 And stockings want mending,
When the neighbours complain
 Of the noise of the cat,
And she ought to be looking
 For this and for that,
And never a line comes
 From her married daughter-
Then off to the kitchen
 With soap and warm water
Goes Mrs Gilfillan
 And all her troubles;
And she puffs them away
 In a great cloud of bubbles.
In joyful abandon
 She puffs them and blows them,
And all round about her
 In rapture she throws them;
When round, clear and shiny
 They hang in the air,
Away like a shadow
 Goes worry and care.

- James Reeves


 

Madame Filon

Quand Madame Filon
 Se sent tout à fait nulle,
Elle reste au salon
 Pour y faire des bulles.
Quand Madame Filon
 A des pensées moroses,
Quand ses pieds sont de plomb,
 Qu'elle se sent tout chose,
Quand il y a trop à faire,
 Que la cheminée fume,
Que tout va de travers
 Comme un nez qui s'enrhume,
Quand le linge est humide
 Car il pleut sans arrêt,
Quand le frigo est vide,
 Les chaussettes trouées,
Quand les voisins surveillent
 Le bruit que fait le chat,
Qu'il faudrait qu'elle veille
 À ceci ou cela,
Et jamais une ligne,
 De sa fille mariée...
Alors dans la cuisine
 Elle s'en va touiller
Un peu d'eau savonneuse
 Et bientôt la voici
Qui d'une humeur joyeuse
 Souffle sur ses soucis.
Elle les change en bulles
 Dansant au-dessus d'elle
Comme des funambules
 Qui seraient dotés d'ailes.
Transparents et brillants,
 Ils s'élèvent dans l'air,
Tels des ballons d'argent :
 Envolées les galères !

Traduction ©2008 Laurent Chiacchiérini


Haut de page

Kingdom Cove

When I went down to Kingdom Cove
The cliffs were brown, the sea was mauve.
Shadows of rocks on the clifftops lay
As the sunset flamed across the bay.
I saw three starfish upon the shore
And up in the sky was one fish more.
Birds on the tumbling water cried
'Ship's away with the morning tide!'
But the man in the lighthouse called to me,
'Don't go crossing the tumbling sea!'
And I saw his telescope up to his eye
Gazing out the sunset sky.
So I shouted out, 'But the night is black:
If I don't go on, I can't go back!'
And then a great storm cracked the sky
And a giant sea-bird scouted by,
He carried me off on his cloudy track
And set me down on a dolphin's back.
There is an island out to sea,
Where tall trees wait to sing for me;
Sing they will in the autumn gale,
And there on the dolphin's back I'll sail.
In Kingdom Cove my father stands,
Shading his eyes with two brown hands,
And three red starfish crumble away
And the land-breeze blows them across the bay.

- James Reeves


 

Kingdom Cove

Lorsque je descendis à Kingdom Cove,
La falaise était brune et la mer mauve.
Les ombres des rochers se détachaient
Dans le soleil qui enflammait la baie.
Je vis trois astéries sur le rivage
Et dans le ciel un autre coquillage.
Sur l'onde agitée les mouettes criaient :
“Voici la marée pour appareiller !”
Mais le gardien du phare m'avertit :
“N'embarquez pas sur la mer en furie !”
Et je vis sa longue-vue se penchant,
Observant au loin le ciel du couchant.
J'hélai : “Il fait noir comme dans un four ;
Impossible de faire demi-tour !”
Un orage alors déchira le ciel,
Un oiseau géant vint à tire-d'aile,
M'emporta comme un vulgaire églefin
Et me posa sur le dos d'un dauphin.
Il existe au large une île enchantée
Où des arbres m'attendent pour chanter ;
Ils chanteront dans le vent automnal
Et sur mon dauphin j'irai à cheval.
Sur la plage se tient toujours mon père,
Se servant des mains comme de visière,
Et s'égrènent les étoiles de mer,
Désagrégées par la brise de terre.

Traduction ©2008 Laurent Chiacchiérini


Haut de page

Brand the Blacksmith

Brand the Blacksmith with his hard hammer
Beats out shoes for the hooves of horses.
Bagot the Boy works at the bellows
To make fine mounts for the King's forces.

Better the music than bell or bugle
When 'Huff !' go the bellows and 'Ding !' goes the hammer
'Better this work by far,' says Bagot.
'Than banging of school bell and grinding of grammar.'

- James Reeves


 

Bertrand Ferrant

Brandissant son marteau sur les braises brûlantes,
Bertrand bat des fers chauds pour chausser les chevaux.
Benoît son bon bras droit manœuvre la soufflante
Pour ferrer les sabots des canassons royaux.

“Il n'est de plus belle musique selon moi
Que le bruit du soufflet ou celui de l'enclume.
Je préfère bien mieux ce travail”, dit Benoît,
“Qu'entendre tinter la cloche ou crisser la plume.”

Traduction ©2008 Laurent Chiacchiérini


Haut de page

The Song of D

Who will sing me the song of D?
How many dancers can you see?
Dinah, Deborah, Duncan, Dick,
And Dan with his fiddle and fiddling stick.
 Sing it low, sing it high,
Till the glory shines in the western sky.

Who will sing me the song of D?
How many cities can you see?
From Dublin Town we'll all jump over
To Dartmouth, Darlington, Deal and Dover.
Sing it low, sing it high,
Till the glory shines in the western sky.

Who will sing me the song of D?
How many flowers can you see?
Daffodil, dahlia, daisy, dock,
Dandelion seed to make a clock.
Sing it low, sing it high,
Till the glory shines in the western sky.

Who will sing me the song of D?
How many creatures can you see?
Dodo, dromedary, dingo, duck,
And the direful Dragon who brings bad luck.
Sing it low, sing it high,
Till the glory shines in the western sky.

Who will sing me the song of D?
How many people can you see?
Doctor, dowager, dustman, duke-
If you want any more you must go and look.
Sing it low, sing it high,
Till the glory shines in the western sky.

- James Reeves


 

Le chant du D

Qui chantera le D pour nous ?
Combien de danseurs voyez-vous ?
Dina, Déborah, Duncan, Dick,
Daniel et son violon magique.
 Chantez en fa, chantez en do,
Quand le soleil brille encore haut.

Qui chantera le D pour nous ?
Combien de villes voyez-vous ?
Départ Dublin, destinations
Douvres, Deauville, Douai, Dijon.
 Chantez en fa, chantez en do,
Quand le soleil brille encore haut.

Qui chantera le D pour nous ?
Combien de plantes voyez-vous ?
Des digitales, d'autres fleurs,
Dames-d'onze-heures donnant l'heure.
 Chantez en fa, chantez en do,
Quand le soleil brille encore haut.

Qui chantera le D pour nous ?
Combien d'animaux voyez-vous ?
Dodos, dromadaires, dindons
Et, porte-malheur, un dragon.
 Chantez en fa, chantez en do,
Quand le soleil brille encore haut.

Qui chantera le D pour nous ?
Combien de messieurs voyez-vous ?
Des docteurs ou des directeurs :
Détectez-les dans le secteur.
 Chantez en fa, chantez en do,
Quand le soleil brille encore haut.

Traduction ©2008 Laurent Chiacchiérini


Haut de page

Long

A short and a short word is 'long',
So let's have a short, not a long song.

 'Long was my beard,' said the sailor,
  'Before we reached port.'
 'Long are my dreams,' said the old man.
  'But memory's short.'
 Long are all days,' said the children,
  'With few of them gone.'
 Long are all lanes,' said the wanderer,
  'Leading me on.'

A short and a short word is 'long',
So let's have a short, not a long song.

 The sailor mended his tackle
  And searched for a breeze.
 The old man thought of a voyage
  To unmapped seas.
 The children weary of playing
  Came from the green;
 The wanderer sighed for a home
  He had never seen.

A short and a short word is 'long',
So that was a short, not a long song.

- James Reeves


 

Long

C’est un mot court que le mot “long”,
Qui vaut une courte chanson.

 Longue est la barbe du marin
  Quand il rentre au matin.
 Longs sont les rêves du vieillard
  Mais courte est sa mémoire.
 Longs sont les jours de nos enfants
  Car il en reste tant.
 Longs les chemins du voyageur
  Sur la voie du bonheur.

C’est un mot court que le mot “long”,
Qui vaut une courte chanson.

 Le marin recoud ses filets
  Et attend la marée.
 Le vieillard se voit sillonner
  Des mers inexplorées.
 Les enfants sont las de jouer
  Et traînent dans la rue.
 Le voyageur soupire après
  Un foyer disparu.

C’est un mot court que le mot “long”,
Qui valait bien cette chanson.

Traduction ©2008 Laurent Chiacchiérini


Haut de page

Heroes on Horseback

Heroes on horseback
Hunt in their hundreds,
Leaving their halls
In the hurry of morn.
High on the hilltop
Is heard the thunder
Of hooves, and the hue
Of hound and horn.

Here in their homesteads
Hover the housewives,
Baking and brewing
Or busy with brush.
Gaily they gossip
And stitch for the children;
For hunting and harrying
They care not a rush.

High in the heavens
The hooked moon hangs.
Home come the hunters
Hungry as hawks.
Never a hare
Has Harry the Huntsman
Caught the whole day,
But hark how he talks!

'Hunters on horseback
Are braggers and boasters!'
So say the housewives
Who give them their stew.
'Without us women
To work and wait on them
What would these heroes,
Our husbands, do?'

- James Reeves


 

Héros hippophiles

Héros hippophiles,
Hordes de hussards,
Chevauchant hostiles,
De bonne heure, hagards.
Chasseurs harnachés,
Franchissant les haies,
Hurlant l'hallali,
Hue, haro, hardi !

Habiles abeilles
Aux habitations,
À tout elles veillent
Avec attention.
Femmes et enfants
Gazouillent gaiement
Car la chasse à courre
N'a point leur amour.

Halo dans le ciel,
La lune est là-haut.
Hongre ou haridelle,
Las sont les chevaux.
Depuis le matin,
Henri le Hautain
N'a pris une hase,
Pourtant comme il jase !

Chasseurs à cheval,
Rentrés en retard,
Leur soupe ils avalent,
Hâbleurs et vantards !
“Sans nous autres femmes
Pour tenir la flamme,
Que feraient-ils nos
Hommes, ces héros ?”

Traduction ©2008 Laurent Chiacchiérini


Haut de page

Islands

I, with my mind's eye, see
Islands and indies fair and free,
Fair and far in the coral sea.
Out of the sea rise palmy shores;
Out of the shore rise plumy trees;
Out of each tree a feathered bird
Sings with a voice like which
 No voice was ever heard,
And palm and plume and feather
Blend and bloom together
In colours like the green
Of summer weather.

And in this island scene
There is no clash nor quarrel;
Here the sea wash
In shining field of coral
Indies and isles that lie
Deep in my mind's eye.

- James Reeves


 

Îlots

Il y a dans mes yeux
Des îlots merveilleux
Sur un océan bleu.
Des rivages palmés,
Des arbres emplumés,
Des oiseaux enflammés
Qui chantent d'une voix
 Comme on n'en entend pas.
Les palmes et les plumes
Fleurissent et se fondent
Dans des couleurs d'agrumes
Sur une plage blonde.

Une scène insulaire
Exempte de colère :
Les vagues balayant
Le beau sable brillant
Des îlots merveilleux
Dans le fond de mes yeux.

Traduction ©2008 Laurent Chiacchiérini


Haut de page

The Troke

I celebrate the various Troke.
 'Why “various”?' I hear you cry.
Be patient, dears, and hold your smoke,
 For I to you will make reply,
Giving you reasons multifarious
Why this strange beast is known as various.

His hide is various, for a start,
 Being yellowish with purple bars
And spots and dots of divers hue
 And others sorts of stripes and stars.
Towards the coming on of the night
He is a rather daunting sight.

But that's not all. He has four legs,
 One long, three short-or vice versa.
He moves in circles, more or less
 Now right, now left; and, what is worser,
His feet are ill-assorted too-
One rough, three smooth, two pink, two blue.

Sometimes he huffs, as if in anger,
 Sometimes he shlurps in amorous vein.
When hungry, he's inclined to whindle;
 The moon evokes a different strain:
Then hear the high nocturnal tone
That freezes all your flesh to stone.

In mood and tamper too, I hear,
 None is more various than the Troke.
At times he sulks in gloomiest dudgeon,
 At times enjoys a simple joke.
But if you laugh at him, my dears,
He'll snip you like a pair of shears.

His diet too is heterogeneous
 (or 'mixed' to us a simpler word)-
One day he wants no food but nuts,
 Next day, it's mice; but on the third
A rival Troke he's apt to slaughter,
Or else he'll fast and live on water.

He is not loved, I must confess,
 Among the Animile community.
He is too unpredictable,
 His life has neither use or unity.
I tolerate, but would not stroke,
The broody, moody, various Troke.

- James Reeves


 

Le trague

Célébrons le trague varié.
 “Varié ?”, m'allez-vous répliquer.
Patience, amis, oyez, oyez,
 Car je m'en vais vous expliquer
Les diverses raisons citées
De cette étrange variété.

Sa peau variée, pour commencer,
 Jaune avec des bandeaux violets,
Est jonchée de tons nuancés,
 Comme une bannière étoilée.
Aussi quand arrive le soir,
Il ferait plutôt peur à voir.

Ce n'est pas tout : sur quatre pattes,
 L'une est trop longue, ou bien trop courte.
Il tourne en rond, à gauche, à droite,
 Et pédale dans le yaourt.
Ses pieds sont fort mal assortis :
Un dur, trois mous, deux verts, deux gris.

Certaines fois il prend la mouche,
 D'autres fois il est pris d'amour.
Affamé, il pleure et se mouche ;
 La lune aussi lui joue des tours.
Dans la nuit son cri monte haut,
Vous glaçant la chair jusqu'aux os.

D'humeur et de tempérament,
 Nul n'est plus varié que le trague.
Il peut bouder plein de tourment,
 Mais sait apprécier une blague.
Or de lui ne vous moquez-pas,
Sinon il vous lacérera.

Son régime est hétérogène
 (ou “mélangé” pour parler simple).
Tantôt ne veut que des châtaignes,
 Tantôt des rongeurs par exemple.
Il peut manger un congénère
Ou bien il jeûne et vit d'eau claire.

On le déteste, il faut le dire,
 Parmi les autres créatures.
Il est impossible à prédire
 Du fait même de sa nature.
Si je veux bien le tolérer,
Jamais ne le caresserais.

Traduction ©2008 Laurent Chiacchiérini


Haut de page

Green Grass

Green grass is all I hear
And grass is all I see
When through tall fields I wander
Swish-swishing to the knee.

Grass is short on the high heath
And long on the hillside.
There's where the rabbits burrow,
And here's where I hide.

The hillside is my castle,
Its walls are the tall grass;
Over them I peer and pry
To see the people pass.

Long and far I send my gaze
Over the valleys low.
There I can see but do not hear
The wagons lumbering slow.

Horseman, footman, shepherd, dog-
Here is my castle green
I see them move through vale and village,
I see but am not seen.

Green grasses whispering round me,
All the summer fine,
Tell me your secrets, meadow grasses,
And I will tell you mine.

- James Reeves


 

Grandes herbes

Les grands herbes que j'entends,
S'étendant à perte de vue,
Lorsque je marche à travers champs,
Viennent fouetter mes genous nus.

L'herbe est plus courte sur la lande ;
C'est là où les lapins furètent.
Sur la colline elle est plus grande ;
C'est là où j'ai fait ma cachette.

Cette colline est mon château ;
Les grandes herbes sont ses murs
Et je peux observer d'en haut
Ceux qui passent dans la nature.

Je porte mon regard au loin,
Là-bas au fond de la vallée.
J'aperçois mais je n'entends point
La circulation défiler.

À pied, en voiture, à cheval,
Du haut de mon château herbu,
Tous ceux qui traversent le val,
Je peux les voir sans être vu.

Grandes herbes qui murmurez,
Tout l'été à partir de juin,
Dites-moi donc tous vos secrets
Et moi je vous dirai les miens.

Traduction ©2008 Laurent Chiacchiérini


Haut de page

The Kwackagee

Back in the bleak and blurry days
When all was murk and mystery-
That is (if I may mint a phrase)
Before the dawn of history.
Professors think there used to be,
Not far from Waikee-waike,
A monster called the Kwackagee,
A sort of flying snake.

This animile, they all agree,
Was forty feet in length,
Would spiral up the tallest tree
And then with all his strength
Propel himself with sinuous grace
And undulation muscular
To find another feeding-place
In some other far vale crepuscular.

Expert opinions are two
About his mode of travel;
Professor Grommit holds one view;
The other, Doctor Gravvle.
Grommit believes he could give off
Some kind of speed-emulsion;
The Doctor, ever prone to scoff,
Postulates jet-propulsion.

In prehistoric Waikee-waike,
The men (if men there were),
Would they in breathless terror quake,
To hear that rattling whirr
As flew the monster through the sky?
Or would they brave the foe
With missile and with battle-cry?-
The experts do not know.

- James Reeves


 

Le guacagie

Dans des temps très lointains d'ici,
Tout n'était que mystère et noir
(Si je puis m'exprimer ainsi)
Avant l'aurore de l'histoire.
Il y eut selon des érudits,
Guère bien loin de Tititlan,
Un monstre appelé guacagie,
Espèce de serpent volant.

Tous sont bien d'accord sur ce point :
Son corps mesurait douze mètres,
S'enroulait sur le plus haut pin
Et de la force de son être
S'élançait gracieusement
En ondulations musculaires
Pour chercher quelques aliments
Dans un vallon crépusculaire.

Les avis des experts divergent
Concernant sa locomotion,
Entre le Professeur Thiberge
Et son confrère Legrognon.
Le premier pense qu'il volait
Par une sorte d'émulsion ;
L'autre préfère postuler
La propulsion à réaction.

Les hommes de la préhistoire
(S'il y avait des hommes vraiment)
Tremblaient-ils fous de désespoir
En entendant le sifflement
Du monstre traversant les cieux
Ou lui lançaient-ils des silex
En poussant des cris belliqueux ?
Là les experts restent perplexes.

Traduction ©2008 Laurent Chiacchiérini


Haut de page

Moths and Moonshine

Moths and Moonshine mean to me
Magic-madness-mystery.

Witches dancing weird and wild
Mischief make for man and child.

Owls screech from woodland shades,
Moths glide through moonlit glades,

Moving in dark and secret wise
Like a plotter in disguise.

Moths and Moonshine mean to me
Magic-madness-mystery.

- James Reeves


 

Minuit

Minuit et ses lépidoptères,
Moment magique de mystère.

Mages blancs dansant dans la nuit,
Malveillants pour grands et petits.

Chouettes chuintant aux ombres brunes,
Papillons planant sous la lune,

Mouvant masqués sous le manteau
Comme les membres d'un complot.

Minuit et ses lépidoptères
M'évoquent magie et mystère.

Traduction ©2008 Laurent Chiacchiérini


Haut de page

Paper

Paper makes a picture-book;
Paper and a pin
Make a coloured parcel
To wrap a present in.

Paper makes a letter
That makes a lady sad;
And sometimes it makes money
To make a poor man glad.

Paper, paper, paper
Makes a lawyer's clerk
Scribble, scratch and scribble
From morn till dead of dark.

Paper makes a dunce's cap;
Paper makes a kite.
I watch it rise upon the wind
And vanish out of sight.

Paper makes all shapes of things;
But best of all to me,
A paper boat upon the stream
Goes bobbing off to sea.

- James Reeves


 

Papier

Papier pour une image ;
Papier et un cordeau
Pour faire un emballage
Et y mettre un cadeau.

Papier pour une lettre
Qui attriste une dame ;
Papier-monnaie peut-être
Pour réjouir une âme.

Papier, papier, papier
Que le clerc va devoir
Gratter et gribouiller
Du matin jusqu'au soir.

Papier du bonnet d'âne ;
Papier du cerf-volant
Qui léger et diaphane
S'en va avec le vent.

Mais de tous ces papiers
Celui que je préfère :
Un bateau de papier
Qui vogue vers la mer.

Traduction ©2008 Laurent Chiacchiérini


Haut de page

The Ozalid

The Ozalid is not a thing
 I greatly care to meet.
Its neck is like a piece of string;
 Its ears are on its feet.

Its single eye is on a swivel;
 This way and that it spins.
Its smudgy nose is apt to snivvle;
 It has three flipperfins.

It has three flipperfins, my friend;
 Its tail is three feet long,
And at its hard and horny end
 It has a fatal prong-

A fatal but useful prong,
 With which it spikes its prey,
The agile tape fish lean and long,
 The chipworm sad and grey.

But once (I tremblingly relate)
 An Ozalid had the luck-
The evil luck, the groojus fate-
 To spear a sleeping duck.

Enraged the duck took instant wing.
 Its flight was straight and strong.
The Ozalid, that hapless thing,
 Could not withdraw its prong.

Hung by its tail beneath the bird,
 The Ozalid soared aloft.
Cries of amazement soon were heard
 From Hull to Lowestoft.

When folks at Folkestone saw the sight
 They clamoured 'How absurd
To see an Ozalid in flight
 Transported by a bird!'

- James Reeves


 

L'ozalide

L'ozalide n'est pas un être
 Qu'on croise volontiers.
Son cou mesure un demi-mètre ;
 Elle entend par les pieds.

Son œil unique et pivotant
 Lui permet de tout voir ;
Son nez taché est déroutant,
 Comme ses trois nageoires.

En effet, elle a trois nageoires
 Et une longue queue,
Au bout aussi dur que l'ivoire,
 Un dard fort dangereux.

Un dard fatal mais bien utile
 Pour attraper sa proie,
Qu'il s'agisse d'un ver agile
 Ou bien d'une lamproie.

Or une fois (j'en tremble encore),
 Par un curieux hasard,
Une ozalide eut le grand tort
 D'embrocher un canard.

Piqué au vif le migrateur
 S'envola dare-dare,
Sans permettre à son agresseur
 De retirer son dard.

Pendue par la queue sous l'oiseau,
 L'ozalide partit
Au milieu des cris des badauds
 Du nord jusqu'au midi.

Les gens d'Agen à son passage
 Se dirent stupéfaits
De voir l'ozalide en voyage,
 Par l'oiseau transportée !

Traduction ©2008 Laurent Chiacchiérini


Haut de page

Avalon

In Avalon lies Arthur yonder;
Over his head the planets wander.
 A great King
 And a great King was he.

By his side sleeps Guinevere;
Of ladies she had no peer.
 A fair Queen
 And a fair Queen was she.

At midnight comes Jack the Knave
By moonlight to rob their grave.
 A false boy
 And a false boy is he.

Jewels he takes, and rings,
The gift of nobles and kings-
 Bright things
 O bright things to see!

On harvest-field and town
The moon and stars look down.
Centuries without number
King and Queen are a-slumber.
 Long have they lain.
In time they will rise again
And all false knaves be slain.
Once more Arthur shall reign.
 A great King
 And a great King is he.

- James Reeves


 

Avalon

Arthur repose en Avalon,
Allongé au creux d'un vallon.
 Un grand roi,
 Quel grand roi autrefois.

Guenièvre dort à son côté,
Par nulle égalée en beauté.
 Une reine,
 La plus belle des reines.

À minuit le valet d'Arthur
S'en vient piller leur sépulture.
 Un fripon,
 Quel fripon ce garçon.

Il vient dérober les joyaux
Et autres attributs royaux :
 Des merveilles,
 Merveilles sans pareilles !

Sur la ville et sur les campagnes
Veillent la lune et ses compagnes.
Depuis des temps immémoriaux
Sommeillent les époux royaux.
 Leur repos a été bien long.
Un jour ils se relèveront
Et tous les fripons périront.
À nouveau Arthur règnera
 Un grand roi,
 Quel grand roi il sera.

Traduction ©2008 Laurent Chiacchiérini


Haut de page

Vain

Vain is the Princess Vara,
 Her mother's eldest daughter.
She looks all day in the mirror
 As a swan in the smooth water.

Her eyes are blue like the waves,
 Her skin is soft and fair;
Red-gold like the autumn leaves
 And thick and long is her hair.

And all for her pride and beauty,
 Gold hair and eyes of blue,
From far-off court and city
 The young men come to woo.

But to none will she answer Yes,
 For none but herself loves she,
Gazing all day in the glass
 With her eyes like the lonely sea.

- James Reeves


 

Vanité

Vanessa est une princesse,
 La fille aînée de son lignage,
Contemplant son miroir sans cesse
 Pour y admirer son image.

Ses yeux sont bleus comme l'azur,
 Son peau est pâle et monotone,
Et l'éclat de sa chevelure
 Rappelle les couleurs d'automne.

Pour son orgueil et sa beauté,
 Ses cheveux d'or et ses yeux bleus,
De partout pour la courtiser
 Les jeunes gens viennent nombreux.

À aucun elle ne dit oui,
 Car elle n'aime qu'elle-même ;
Elle n'a d'yeux que pour celui
 Qui lui renvoie son regard blême.

Traduction ©2008 Laurent Chiacchiérini


Haut de page

Tarlingwell

A town of ten towers
Is Tarlingwell,
And in every tower
There hangs a bell.

At twelve by the clock
What a ding-dang-dell
Sounds from the towers
Of Tarlingwell!

Over the broad
And blustery weald
So many voices
Never pealed.

Harsh or mellow,
Cracked or sound,
They tell the people
For miles around

That Tarlingwell
With its ten towers tall
Still stands, whatever
Else may fall.

- James Reeves


 

Tours

La cité tourangelle
Est entourée de tours
Et dans chacune d'elles,
Une cloche à son tour.

À douze heures tapantes,
Toute une ritournelle
Retentit des soupentes
De ces tours tourangelles.

Telles des tourterelles,
Colportées par le vent,
Ces cloches nous appellent
Comme jamais avant.

Sourdes ou cristallines,
À des lieues à la ronde,
Elles sonnent matines
Pour annoncer au monde

Que ces tours tourangelles
Entourant la cité
Seront toujours fidèles,
Quoi qu'il puisse arriver.

Traduction ©2008 Laurent Chiacchiérini


Haut de page

O Nay!

'O nay! O nay! O nay!'
 I heard the crier call.
'There is no news today-
 No news, no news at all.'

'No cow has gone astray!'
 I heard the crier call.
'No foe is on the way!
 There is no news at all.'

'The Mayor has gone away.
 Good people, one and all,
 Are now on holiday,'
 I heard the crier call.

'O nay! O nay! O nay!'
 I heard the crier call.
'No folks in town do stay-
 Methinks no more will I!'

- James Reeves


 

Oyez !

“Oyez ! Oyez ! Oyez !”
 Aboyait le crieur.
“Plus rien à signaler,
 Ni ici ni ailleurs.”

“Point de bête égarée !”
 S'écriait l'aboyeur.
“Point d'ennemi au guet !
 Il n'y a aucun malheur.”

“Le bourgmestre est allé
 Se reposer ailleurs ;
La cité s'est vidée,”
 Proclamait le crieur.

“Oyez ! Oyez ! Oyez !”
 Annonçait le crieur.
“La ville est désertée :
 Je m'en vais voir ailleurs !”

Traduction ©2008 Laurent Chiacchiérini


Haut de page

The Sniggle

The Sniggle (often called the Snyle)
Is not a lovely animile.
He has four legs equipped with claws,
Another six with sucker-paws.
When thus he climbs up walls of rock,
You hear his suckers go plick-plock.
Plick-plock plick-plock-by night he crawls
On gutter-pipes and roofs and walls.
The Sniggle's is a groujus noise,
Dreaded by all offending boys.
The Sniggle lurks in Woeful Woods
And noses out his favourite foods-
The slow-worm and the blunderbug,
The slurp, the giant hairy slug,
Also that most galooshus dish,
The frozocrumm or finger-fish.
The full-grown adult Snyle (or Sniggle)
Has one long horn which he can wiggle,
Emitting a ferocious bray
With which to terrorize his prey.
When terrorized himself, the Snyle
Secretes a black and fexious bile.
The men who flourished long ago
Beside the River Gallimo
Use it to smear upon their skins
To scare away the gobbolins.
Others, for more artistic ends,
Employed it to surprise their friends
By making abstract wall designs
In flowing and expressive lines.
Noxious as is the Sniggle male,
To see his mate your heart would fail,
For she is squalid, squat and small.
She has no bile, no claws at all;
Her horn is short and will not wiggle,
Her only note a nervous giggle.
She lives on scraps her mate supplies.
I say in short, and none denies,
The female Sniggle is a creature
Without a sole redeeming feature.
So I conclude with jubilation
This sad, this groojus recitation.

- James Reeves


 

Le snille

Le snille (on prononce aussi “snile”)
N'est pas un animal civil :
Quatre pattes griffues sur douze,
Les autres dotées de ventouses.
Lorsqu'il gravit des murs de roc,
Ses huit ventouses font plic-ploc.
Dans la nuit on l'entend ramper
Sur les toits et les parapets.
Il émet un gros grognement
Qui effraie tous les garnements.
Il se tapit au Bois Maudit,
Débusquant ses mets favoris :
Le ver lent et l'hurlumerlue,
La grande limace poilue,
Ainsi que ce plat succulent,
Une fricassée d'éperlan.
Le snile (on dit aussi “le snille”)
A une corne qu'il tortille.
Fort férocement il aboie,
Terrorisant ainsi sa proie.
S'il est terrorisé lui-même,
Il secrète une bile “excrème”.
Les gens qui habitaient jadis
Sur les rives de la Gladice
Comme d'un onguent s'en servaient
Pour éloigner les farfadets.
D'autres, artistes par nature,
L'utilisaient comme peinture,
Traçant des dessins sur les murs
À la ligne expressive et pure.
Pour nuisible que soit le mâle,
Qui voit la snille se sent mal
Car elle est rabougrie vraiment
Et rit parfois nerveusement.
Sa corne est courte et immobile ;
Chez elle, ni griffes ni bile.
Elle vit de son compagnon
Qui lui laisse quelques trognons.
Cette créature femelle
Assurément n'a rien pour elle.
Je dois donc non sans émotion
Conclure ma récitation.

Traduction ©2008 Laurent Chiacchiérini


Haut de page

Egg to Eat

Early this morning when earth was empty
I went to the farmyard to fetch me an egg.
I spoke to the pullets who strolled about scratching
And the proud feathered cock who stood on one leg.

'Not an egg! Not an egg!' they all said together.
'We haven't been given any corn for two days.'
So I went to the merchant who lives by the market,
And I asked him to give me some barley and maize.

'Not a grain! Not a grain!' was the corn-merchant's answer.
'I need a new wheel for to fix on my cart.'
So I said to the wheelwright, 'Please give me a wheel, sir,
For without it the corn-merchant's wagon won't start.'

'Not a wheel, not a wheel can I make!' said the wheelwright.
'If you bring a new hammer, why then I will try.'
So I searched up and down, but I couldn't find a hammer,
And I went down to the forest to sit down and cry.

There I met an old wife and asked her politely,
'Oh madam, can you lend me a hammer, I beg?'
'Why no,' said the wife, 'for I haven't got a hammer,
But if it will help you, I will give you an egg.'

So she gave me an egg, and I said to her, 'Madam,
This surely must be the best egg ever born.'
'So it is,' said the wife. 'If you want the best eggs,
You must always your laying birds plenty of corn.'

- James Reeves


 

Échanges

En me levant ce matin peu après le jour,
J'allai à la ferme pour me chercher un œuf.
J'abordai les poules qui grattaient dans la cour
Et le fier coq dressé, brillant comme un sou neuf.

“Pas un œuf ! Pas un œuf !”, me dirent les volailles.
“Depuis deux jours nous n'avons rien à picorer.”
J'allai voir le marchand qui nourrit le bétail
Pour lui demander un peu d'avoine et de blé.

“Pas un grain ! Pas un grain !”, dit le marchand de blé.
“J'ai besoin d'une roue pour ma vieille charrette.”
J'allai voir le charron : “Une roue, s'il vous plaît,
Pour le marchand de blé et sa vieille charrette.”

“Pas de roue ! Pas de roue !”, me dit-il aussitôt.
“Si j'avais un marteau, dans ce cas j'essaierais.”
J'eus beau chercher partout, point ne vis de marteau,
Alors j'allai pleurer, assis dans la forêt.

Là je vis une vieille à qui je dit penaud :
“Auriez-vous, je vous prie, un marteau à prêter ?”
Elle répondit : “Non, je n'ai point de marteau,
Mais je puis vous donner un œuf à déguster.”

Elle m'en donna un et je lui dit heureux :
“C'est le meilleur œuf que j'aie jamais dévoré.”
Elle me rétorqua : “Pour avoir de bons œufs,
Donnez à vos poules du grain à picorer.”

Traduction ©2008 Laurent Chiacchiérini


Haut de page

Rain

Rain and rain is all I see
Falling on roof and stone and tree,
And all I hear is rain and rain
Hush-hushing on lawn and lane.

Moor and meadow, fern and flower
Drink the raindrops, hour by hour.
How sparkling are the ivy leaves
That catch the drops from farmhouse eaves!

When in my attic bed I lie
I hear it fall from the cloudy sky,
Hush-hushing all around
With its low and lulling sound.

Then in the light of morning clear
How new and green all things appear;
Then flow the brooks, and springs the grain,
And birds give joyful thanks for rain.

Rain, rain no more I hear,
But only bird-songs everywhere;
And rain, rain no more I see,
But shining sun on roof and tree.

- James Reeves


 

Ruissellement

Le ruissellement de la pluie
Tombe des toits et des feuillages
Et je n'entends pas d'autre bruit
Sur l'herbe et sur le carrelage.

Prés et prairies, fleurs et fougères
Boivent la pluie goutte après goutte.
Je regarde briller le lierre
Qui lui sait les attraper toutes.

Bien à l'abri dessous mon toit,
Écoutant s'écouler la pluie
Qui tombe tout autour de moi,
Je m'endors bercé par son bruit.

Puis, dans la clarté du matin,
Tout apparaît vert et nouveau :
Flot des torrents, éclat des grains,
Et le chant content des oiseaux.

Ce n'est plus la pluie que j'entends
Mais de tous côtés leur ramage
Et je vois le ruissellement
Du soleil entre les branchages.

Traduction ©2008 Laurent Chiacchiérini


Haut de page

X-Roads

Besides the cross-roads on the hill
With crossed sails stands the mill
 That once ground corn to make men bread.
Up to that hill two armies came
With crossed swords to fight for fame.
 Night fell on many brave men dead.

These are the words the four winds cried:
'Fame is a shadow; vain is pride;
 Trampled cornfields will not grow.'
Now if those men had ceased from strife
And harkened to the winds of life,
 They would have lived to plough and sow.

- James Reeves


 

CroiX

Près de la croisée des chemins
Tournent les ailes d'un moulin
 Qui servait à moudre le blé.
Non loin de là deux armées fières
Autrefois ont croisé le fer ;
 Maints braves hommes sont tombés.

Voici les mots des quatre vents :
“La gloire est vaine bien souvent ;
 Blé piétiné ne peut germer.”
Si ces hommes avaient suivi
Les avis des vents de la vie,
 Ils auraient vécu pour semer.

Traduction ©2008 Laurent Chiacchiérini


Haut de page

Un

Uncut is your corn, Farmer Hearn,
Unstacked your hay.
Unfed, your fifteen pigs
Have run away.

Unpaid are your men, Farmer Hearn,
Unpainted your byre.
Unswept is your kitchen floor,
Unlit your fire.

Unmade is your bed, Farmer Hearn,
Uncombed your hair;
You have gone with the gypsy-men
Off to the fair.

Fiddling and sing-song, Farmer Hearn,
They're the ruin of you.
When unkind winter blows
What will you do?

- James Reeves


 

Un

Un champ de blé pas moissonné,
Un tas de paille éparpillé,
Un troupeau de porcs affamés,
Qui s'est sauvé.

Un palefrenier pas payé,
Un enclos qui n'est pas repeint,
Un sol qui n'est pas balayé,
Un feu éteint.

Un lit qui n'a pas été fait,
Un fermier qui n'est pas coiffé ;
À la foire il s'en est allé
Pour festoyer.

Ces nuits de danse et de chansons
À la longue vous ruineront.
Quand soufflera le vent d'hiver,
Qu'allez-vous faire ?

Traduction ©2008 Laurent Chiacchiérini


Haut de page

Yonder

Through yonder park there runs a stream;
By yonder stream there sits a man;
As yonder man in silence sits
He catches fish as best he can.

While yonder fish, one, two and three,
Through yonder limpid water steer,
Why does yon silent fisherman
Drop first a sigh and then a tear?

Why does he cast yon fishing-line
Again, again, and all for nought?
It is because yon little fish,
For all his care, will not be caught.

- James Reeves


 

Y a...

Au fond du parc, y a un ruisseau.
Au bord de l'eau, y a un p'tit vieux.
Au bout d'sa ligne, un vermisseau
Tente de pêcher de son mieux.

Au fond de l'eau, y a des poissons
Qui nagent dans l'onde limpide.
Savez-vous pour quelle raison
Le pêcheur demeure impavide ?

Pourquoi relance-t-il sa ligne
Encore et encore et en vain ?
Car il nourrit l'espoir insigne
D'attraper même un alevin.

Traduction ©2008 Laurent Chiacchiérini


Haut de page

Sky, Sea, Shore

Stars in a frosty sky
Crackle and blaze ;
Streams in the lowland meadows
Linger and laze ;
Shells on the seashore gleam,
Washed by the tide ;
Seagulls over the harbour
Circle and glide.
 Blue smoke and prancing steed,
 Swallow and snake and swan-
 How many more
 Curving, glistening S-things
 In sky, sea, shore?

- James Reeves


 

Signes

Sombres scintillements astraux
Semés aux cieux ;
Serpentement sourd des ruisseaux
Si paresseux ;
Sillons sur le sable tracés
Sous la marée ;
Sarcelles survolant des barges
En cercles larges.
 Signaux de fumée des squaws sioux,
 Cygnes, serpents et scoubidous.
 Si seulement nous savions mieux
 Combien de signes sinueux
 Surgissent en dessous des cieux.

Traduction ©2008 Laurent Chiacchiérini


Haut de page

Zachary Zed

Zachary Zed was the last man,
 The last man left on earth.
For everyone else had died but him
 And no more come to birth.

In former times young Zachary
 Had asked a maid to wed.
'I loves thee, dear,' he told her true,
 'Will thou be Missis Zed?'

'No, not if you was the last man
 On earth!' the maid replied;
And he was; but she wouldn't give consent,
 And in due time she died.

So all alone stood Zachary.
 ''Tis not so bad,' he said,
'There's no none to make me brush my hair
 Nor send me up to bed.

'There's none can call me wicked,
 Nor none to argufy,
So dang my soul if I don't per-nounce
 LONG LIVE KING ZACHAR-Y !'

So Zachary Zed was the last man
 And the last King beside,
And never a person lived to tell
 If ever Zachary died.

- James Reeves


 

Zacharie Zed

Zacharie Zed était le dernier sur la terre,
 Le dernier être humain,
Car les autres avaient rejoint le cimetière :
 L'espèce avait pris fin.

Une demoiselle avait été adorée
 Du jeune Zacharie.
“Voudrais-tu, s'il te plaît,” avait-il déclaré
 “Me prendre pour mari ?”

“Non, quand bien même le dernier homme ici-bas
 Tu serais !”, lui dit-elle.
Il était le dernier ; elle n'en voulut pas
 Et mourut demoiselle.

Zacharie se retrouva donc tout seul et vieux.
 Cela lui plut plutôt.
“Personne ne m'oblige à peigner mes cheveux
 Ni à me coucher tôt.”

“Il n'y a personne pour me réprimander
 Ni lutter avec moi ;
Je suis donc le mieux indiqué pour commander :
 LONGUE VIE AU ROI MOI !”

Zacharie Zed fut donc le dernier sur la terre,
 Le dernier roi d'ici,
Et nul ne vécut pour résoudre ce mystère :
 Mourut-il lui aussi ?

Traduction ©2008 Laurent Chiacchiérini


Haut de page

Quiet

Of all creatures
 Quiet is the shyest;
She has her fingers to her lips.
She loves not cities
 but a mountain lakeside
Where peaceful water laps.

At nesting-time
 to see the mother blackbird
Quiet on tiptoe creeps;
And in the kitchen
 with scarce a blink she watches
The mice come out for scraps.

In fairgrounds
 Or by the August seaside
Quiet will not stop;
But walks in winter
 on snow fresh-fallen
With light and muffled step.

She loves the fireside
 when the guests have gone,
And downward the ember slips;
Beside the cot she lingers
 hardly breathing
Because the baby sleeps.

- James Reeves


 

Quiétude

Parmi tous elle est celle
 Qui est la plus tranquille,
Dont les lèvres se scellent.
Elle a quitté la ville
 Pour un lac de montagne
Aux eaux calmes qui stagnent.

Devant une nichée,
 Elle observe en sourdine
Sur ses orteils perchée
Ou bien dans la cuisine
 Contemple une souris
Qui mange un grain de riz.

Au milieu des forains
 Ou d'une plage en août
Vous ne la verrez point ;
Mais marchant sur la route
 En hiver enneigée
D'un pas doux et léger.

Assise au coin du feu,
 Les invités partis,
Elle se penche un peu
Sur le lit du petit,
 À peine respirant,
En veillant son enfant.

Traduction ©2008 Laurent Chiacchiérini


Haut de page

In the Train

She is the passenger with restless eyes
Who twists the ticket in her black-gloved fingers.
None knows what calculation, what surmise
Disturb her as the train jerks on or lingers.
Above the eyes her brow is smooth and yellow.
'I grant,' her silence says, 'that all I planned
Has been like something graven in the sand,
But tell me how your schemes work out, my fellow.'

- James Reeves


 

Dans le train

Voyez la voyageuse avec ses yeux hagards,
Tordant son ticket dans ses doigts gantés de noir.
Nul ne sait quelles pensées ou bien quels calculs
L'obsèdent dans le train lent qui nous véhicule.
Au-dessus de ses yeux son front est lisse et blond.
Son silence nous dit : “J'avoue que tous mes plans
Sont comme lettres gravées dans le sable blanc ;
Où donc en sont vos plans, mes très chers compagnons ?”

Traduction ©2008 Laurent Chiacchiérini


Haut de page

The Prisoners

Somehow we never escaped
 Into the sunlight,
Though the gates were always unbarred
 And the warders tight.
For the sketches on the walls
 Were to our liking,
And squeaks from the torture-cell
 Most satisfying.

- James Reeves


 

Les prisonniers

Nous ne sommes pas enfuis
 Du fond de nos trous,
En dépit des verrous non mis
 Et des geôliers soûls :
Les dessins gravés sur les murs
 Étaient à nos goûts ;
Les cris des salles de torture
 Nous plaisaient beaucoup.

Traduction ©2008 Laurent Chiacchiérini


Haut de page

Words

In woods are words.
You hear them all,
Winsome, witless or wise,
When the birds call.

In woods are words.
If your ears wake
You hear them, quiet and clear,
When the leaves shake.

In woods are words.
You hear them all
Blown by the wet wind
When raindrops fall.

In woods are words
Kind or unkind;
Birds, leaves and hushing rain
Bring them to mind.

- James Reeves


 

Wouah !

Les voix des bois
Sont toutes là.
Charmants, oiseux ou beaux :
Chants des oiseaux.

Les voix des bois,
Elles voyagent.
Ouatés, clairs à la fois :
Bruits des feuillages.

Les voix des bois,
Je les entends,
Convoyées par le vent,
Quand la pluie choit.

Les voix des bois,
Tristesse ou joie,
Oiseaux, feuilles et gouttes
Les envoient toutes.

Traduction ©2008 Laurent Chiacchiérini


Haut de page

Kay

Kay, Kay
Good sir Kay,
Lock the gate
Till dawn of day,
So to keep bad men away.

This is the Keep,
And this is the key.
Who keeps the key
Of the Keep?
     Sir Kay.

Kay, Kay
Good sir Kay,
Lock the gate
Till dawn of day.

The bell has rung
To evensong.
The priest has blessed
The kneeling throng.
In bower and hall
To bed have gone
Knights and squires
All and one,
Lords and ladies
One and all,
Groom in kitchen,
Steed in stall.

Kay, Kay
Good sir Kay,
Lock the gate
Till dawn of day.
On shield and scabbard
Starlight falls,
Stalk the watchmen
Along the walls.
From hazel thicket
The screech-owl calls.
By the dying fire
The boarhounds sleep.
Sir Kay, Sir Kay,
Lock fast the keep.

This is the Keep,
And this is the key.
Who keeps the key
Of the Keep?
     Sir Kay.

Kay, Kay
Good sir Kay,
Lock the gate
Till dawn of day,
So to keep bad men away.

It is late, late.
Lock fast the gate.

- James Reeves


 

Kay

Messire Kay,
Fermez à clé,
À double tour,
Jusques au jour,
Afin les vilains d'éloigner.

Du châtelet
Voici la clé.
Qui a la clé
Du châtelet ?
     Messire Kay.

Messire Kay,
Fermez à clé,
À double tour,
Jusques au jour.

Les vêpres sont finies
Et le prêtre a béni
La foule agenouillée,
Rassemblée pour prier.
Regagnant leur chambrée,
Chevaliers, écuyers,
Sont allés se coucher ;
Toute la maisonnée,
Les hommes et les femmes,
Les seigneurs et les dames
Comme les cuisiniers
Et les palefreniers.

Messire Kay,
Fermez à clé,
À double tour,
Jusques au jour.
Fourreaux et boucliers
Dans la nuit étoilée
Font briller les soudards
Veillant sur les remparts.
Au fond d'un noisetier,
Une chouette a crié.
Près de la cheminée
Dorment les lévriers.
Sire Kay, sans délai,
Fermez le châtelet.

Quelle est la clé
Dite en anglais ?
On dit “the key”.
La clé de qui ?
     Messire Kay.

Messire Kay,
Fermez à clé,
À double tour,
Jusques au jour
Afin les vilains d'éloigner.

Il se fait tard :
Verrouillez sans retard.

Traduction ©2008 Laurent Chiacchiérini


Haut de page

Ragged Robin

Robin was a king of men,
A king of far renown,
But then he fell on evil days
And lost his royal crown.
Ragged Robin he was called;
He lived in ragged times,
And so to earn his livelihood
He took to making rhymes.

A score or so of ragged rhymes
He made-some good, some bad;
He sang them up and down the lanes
Till people called him mad.
They listened for Mad Robin's songs
Through all the countryside,
And when they heard his voice no more
They guessed that he died.

Now Ragged Robin was not dead
But changed into a bird,
And every year on tile and tree
His piping voice is heard.
His breast is clad with scarlet red,
His cloak and hood are brown;
And once more he is Winter's king
Although he wears no crown.

Cold are the skies where Robin reigns,
And evergreen his throne.
He whistles to defy the wind;
His tunes are all his own.
But here within this book are set
Some of the ragged rhymes
Mad Robin by the hedgerows sang
In far-off ragged times.

- James Reeves


 

Le roitelet

Il était roi parmi les hommes,
Un grand roi s'il en fut ;
Hélas, il perdit son royaume :
Un jour il fut déchu.
On l'appelait le Roi Mendiant
Car il était bohème ;
Réduit à vivre d'expédients,
Il chantait des poèmes.

Il en composa vingt ou trente
De plus ou moins bon goût,
Les chantant qu'il pleuve ou qu'il vente ;
Les gens le crurent fou.
Ils écoutaient le Fou chanter
Dans les champs au dehors ;
Dès lors qu'il se fut absenté,
Les gens le crurent mort.

Or le Roi Mendiant n'est pas mort
Mais changé en oiseau
Et chaque année il chante encore :
Sa voix monte très haut.
Sa tête est surmontée de jaune,
Il porte un manteau vert ;
Bien que n'ayant plus sa couronne,
Il règne sur l'hiver.

Malgré le froid bon an mal an,
Son trône est toujours vert.
Il siffle pour défier le vent,
Chantant ses propres airs.
Le présent recueil réunit
Quelques-uns de ces chants,
Ceux que le Roi Fou répandit
Il y a bien longtemps.

Traduction ©2008 Laurent Chiacchiérini


Haut de page

The Swan

Against the unrelenting stream,
 Ignoring sunset's angry hour,
Floated the miraculous swan,
And in her beak a single flower.

My eyes reflected sunset's flush;
 Resentful on the bank I cried :
'Dishonoured queen of spite and greed,
 Take hence your emblem with your pride.'

But she sailed on in constancy
 And stopped beside me on the flood.
I saw the flower, a thornless rose,
 Was dark and crimson as her blood.

And looking on her there I guessed
 That she was miracle indeed,
A swan for grace and royalty
 Yet knowing neither scorn nor greed.

She bent her head upon the bank
 And laying all her pride apart
She gave her rose into my hand.
 My falling tears found out its heart.

- James Reeves


 

Le cygne

Contre le flot impétueux,
 Ignorant le courroux de l'heure,
Vogue un cygne miraculeux,
 Tenant en son bec une fleur.

Mirant la rougeur du couchant,
 “Être cupide et dédaigneux”,
Hurlé-je mon ressentiment,
“Emporte ton signe orgueilleux !”

Mais s'avançant vers moi l'air digne,
 Il s'arrête dans le courant.
Je vois sa rose sans épines,
 Rouge foncé comme son sang.

Et en l'observant j'y devine
 Un beau miracle en vérité,
Un gracieux, majestueux cygne,
 Sans mépris ni avidité.

Sa tête vers le bord s'incline
 Et délaissant toute fierté
Il me tend sa rose sanguine,
 Son cœur par mes larmes touché.

Traduction ©2009 Laurent Chiacchiérini


Haut de page

Leaving Town

It was impossible to leave the town.
Bumping across a maze of obsolete rails
Three times we reached the gasworks and reversed.
We could not get away from the canal;
Dead cats, dead hopes in those grey deeps immersed,
Over our efforts breathed a spectral prayer.
The cattle-market and the gospel-hall
Returned like fictions of our own despair,
And like Hesperides the suburbs seemed,
Shining far off towards the guiltless fields.
We finished in a little cul-de-sac
Where on the pavement sat a ragged girl
Mourning beside a jug-and-bottle entrance.
Once more we turned the car and started back.

- James Reeves


 

Quitter la ville

Il nous fut impossible de quitter la ville.
Nous butions contre l'entrelacs des rails rouillés ;
Trois fois nous rebroussons, arrivés aux usines.
Le canal, pas moyen de nous en éloigner :
Des chats, des espoirs morts engloutis dans l'eau noire ;
Sur nos efforts soufflaient des prières spectrales.
Le marché aux bestiaux, la salle paroissiale
Revenaient tels les fruits de notre désespoir
Et les banlieues au loin comme les Hespérides
Brillaient de mille feux vers les prairies candides.
Nous aboutîmes dans une impasse dernière ;
Sur le trottoir assise une fille en haillons
Sanglotait à côté d'un débit de boissons.
Une nouvelle fois nous fîmes marche arrière.

Traduction ©2009 Laurent Chiacchiérini


Haut de page

Old Crabbed Men

This old crabbed man, with his wrinkled, fusty clothes
And his offensive smell-who would suppose
That in his day he invented a new rose
Exciting still the fastidious eye and nose ?

That old crabbed man, sloven of speech and dress,
Was once known among women-who would now guess?-
As a lover of the most perfect address,
Reducing the stubbornest beauty to nakedness.

This old crabbed man, pattering and absurd,
With a falsetto voice-which of you has heard
How in his youth he mastered the lyric word?
His unflawed verse spoke like a March bird.

- James Reeves


 

Vieux grincheux

Ce vieux monsieur grincheux, aux vêtements fripés,
À l'effroyable odeur, comment s'imaginer
Qu'autrefois il avait une rose inventé,
Délectant des plus délicats l'œil et le nez.

Ce vieux monsieur grincheux, à l'aspect négligé,
Était jadis connu - qui l'aurait deviné ? -
Comme un charmeur assez adroit pour dénuder
La plus entêtée parmi toutes les beautés.

Ce vieux monsieur grincheux, risible et chevrotant,
À la voix de fausset, peut-on quand on l'entend
Croire qu'il maîtrisait l'art lyrique en son temps ;
Que son chant évoquait un oiseau au printemps.

Traduction ©2009 Laurent Chiacchiérini


Haut de page

The Password

If you have seen the error of the moth,
 The white moth stumbling through the starless night,
And heard, though dumb, the entreaty of her wings
 Bruised and defeated in your treadmill light;

If you have seen how lamplight from a room
 Falls on the coloured flowers and the grass
Warm as a promise, private as a smile,
 Touching as sorrow in a looking-glass ;

If, on a summer night, from distant strings
 Wordless nostalgia of a serenade
Hints in your ear a refuge out of time
 Where the innocent need not be afraid -

O if the moth, the lamplight and the music,
 If these are tokens between me and you,
There needs no password to our understanding
 And no formality to let you through.

- James Reeves


 

Mot de passe

Si tu as aperçu l'erreur des papillons
 Qui volètent tout blancs dans la nuit toute noire
Et entendu les muettes supplications
 De leurs ailes meurtries venant heurter tes phares ;

Si tu as observé une lumière luire
 Sur les fleurs colorées et sur l'herbe avec grâce,
Une chaude promesse et un discret sourire,
 Touchante comme le chagrin dans une glace ;

Si par un soir d'été, sur des violons distants,
 La nostalgie sans mots née d'un air écouté
Évoque à ton oreille un refuge hors du temps,
 Là où les innocents n'ont rien à redouter...

Si les papillons, la lumière et la musique
 Sont des signes pour nous comprendre bien assez,
Il n'est point besoin de mot de passe magique
 Ni de formalités pour te laisser passer.

Traduction ©2009 Laurent Chiacchiérini


Haut de page

At the Window

Then more-than-morning quiet
The pretty lawn extended;
And rooted trees stood tall
On westward shadows pointing.

Answering no will, my hand
Dropped from the window-catch,
My throat was undecided
Whether to sob or sing.

Why trees were not, nor morning,
No flash of mind revealed,
Maybe throat and hands had greeted
A memory more clear than sight.

- James Reeves


 

À la fenêtre

D'un calme plus que matinal,
La jolie pelouse s'étale ;
Elle est plantée d'arbres très grands,
Ombres pointant vers le couchant.

Involontairement ma main
Se détache de la poignée,
Ma gorge ne sachant pas bien
S'il faut sangloter ou chanter.

Pourquoi n'y a-t-il plus ni arbres, ni matin...
Aucune explication dans mon esprit ne vient.
Peut-être que mes mains et ma gorge ont trouvé
Un souvenir plus clair que la réalité.

Traduction ©2009 Laurent Chiacchiérini


Haut de page

Had I Passion to Match my Skill

Had I passion to match my skill,
I would not hear the worm complain,
The worm that frets and mumbles still
In the corridors of my brain.

The flames that burn inside my heart,
On what fuel do they feed?
I the mystery would impart,
Had I skill to match my need.

Had I passion and skill
To match my daring will,
I would rise and seek
The stony path that scales the virgin peak.

Between my hands I hold my brain,
Between my ribs I nurse a fire;
Beyond my utmost step remain
The summits where the goats aspire.

Inside my brain the worm revolves,
The heart consumes inside my breast;
And so I sit, and nothing solves
The puzzles that are not expressed.

- James Reeves


 

La passion et le don

Si don rimait avec passion,
Je n'entendrais ce vermisseau
Émettre ses protestations
Dans les couloirs de mon cerveau.

Les flammes brûlant dans mon cœur,
Quel peut être leur carburant ?
Je vous le confierais sur l'heure
Si j'avais le don que j'attends.

Avec le don et la passion
Pour seconder ma volonté,
Je gravirais le raidillon
Jusqu'à ce sommet inviolé.

Dans mes mains je tiens mon cerveau,
Dans mon sein je nourris un feu ;
Derrière mes pas les plus hauts
Restent les sommets près des cieux.

Dans mon cerveau tourne le ver,
Mon cœur se consume et m'opprime ;
Je reste assis et rien n'éclaire
Les énigmes que rien n'exprime.

Traduction ©2009 Laurent Chiacchiérini


Haut de page

The Little Brother

God! how they plagued his life, the three damned sisters,
Throwing stones at him out of the cherry trees,
Pulling his hair, smudging his exercises,
Whispering. How passionately he sees
His spilt minnows flounder in the grass.

There will be sisters subtler far than these,
Baleful and dark, with slender, cared-for hands,
Who will not smirk and babble in the trees,
But feed him with sweet words and provocations,
And in his sleep practise their sorceries,
Appearing in the form of ragged clouds
And at the corners of malignant seas.

As with his wounded life he goes alone
To the world's end, where even tears freeze,
He will in bitter memory and remorse
Hear the lost sisters innocently tease.

- James Reeves


 

Le petit frère

Qu'elles l'ont embêté, les trois satanées sœurs,
Lui lançant des cailloux du haut des cerisiers,
Lui tirant les cheveux, maculant ses devoirs,
Chuchotant tandis qu'il voyait avec fureur
Ses poissons renversés frétiller dans le pré.

Sans doute existe-t-il quelques sœurs plus subtiles,
Que ces sombres harpies aux doigts minces et blancs,
Qui au lieu de sourire en coin et de babil,
Ont des mots gentils et des encouragements,
Et non dans son sommeil jettent des sortilèges,
Évoquant les contours de nuages de neige
Aux confins éloignés de malins océans.

Avec sa vie meurtrie s'en allant solitaire
Jusqu'au bout de la terre, où même les pleurs gèlent,
Il entendra encore en sa mémoire amère
Ses sœurs perdues qui innocemment le harcèlent.

Traduction ©2009 Laurent Chiacchiérini


Haut de page

When Two

When two have no nutrition but the air
Love is the product of a twin despair.

- James Reeves


 

Deux êtres

Quand deux êtres n'ont pour repas que l'air du soir,
L'amour est le produit d'un commun désespoir.

Traduction ©2009 Laurent Chiacchiérini


Haut de page

One Propriety

There's only one propriety
(Whatever you may think)-
To nurture in sobriety
The brats we get in drink.

- James Reeves


 

Décence

Une élémentaire décence
(Quoi que certains parfois en pensent) :
Élever en sobriété
Les enfants de l'ébriété.

Traduction ©2009 Laurent Chiacchiérini


Haut de page

Ethology

When the geese write a book
On Konrad Lorenz,
Ethology
Will begin to make sense.

- James Reeves


 

Éthologie

Lorsque les oies auront écrit
Un livre sur Konrad Lorenz,
L'éthologie
Prendra un sens.

Traduction ©2009 Laurent Chiacchiérini


Haut de page

You in Anger

You in your anger tried to make us new,
 To cancel all the warmth and loving-kindness
With which maturing time has joined us two,
 And re-infect love with its former blindness.

It was as if you said, 'I am a stranger;
 Unknown we face each other, woman and man.
We stand, as once we stood, in mortal danger;
 Risk everything, as I do, if you can.'

Then do not now repent your wilful scorn;
 Although in that black hour I hated you,
Yet in that hour, love, was my love re-born;
 When you in anger tried to make us new.

- James Reeves


 

Dans ta colère

Dans ta colère tu voulais nous rénover,
 Annuler la chaleur et tout l'attachement
Qui au fil du temps nous avaient tous deux liés,
 Pour rendre à l'amour son ancien aveuglement.

Comme si tu disais : “Nous sommes étrangers ;
  Inconnus nous nous faisons face tous les deux.
Debout comme jadis, dans un mortel danger ;
 Joue ton va-tout, comme je le fais, si tu peux.

Ne regrette donc point ton aggressivité
 Bien qu'en cette heure noire, je t'aie détestée,
À cette heure mon amour a ressuscité,
 Quand ta colère voulait nous renouveler.

Traduction ©2009 Laurent Chiacchiérini


Haut de page

To Help Us

Technology has found no way
To help us in our desperation,
Build on the ruin of a day
An evening's reconciliation.

- James Reeves


 

Nous aider

La technique ne peut rien pour
Nous aider en plein désespoir
À tirer des ruines du jour
La réconciliation du soir.

Traduction ©2009 Laurent Chiacchiérini


Haut de page

Waters of Life

The hasting dark has driven home
Father and mother, child and maid,
Who by this leafy spring since noon
Have chattered, scolded, wept and smiled.

The feet that loitered by the stream
And voices on the wind have fled.
The leaves that screen the dormant birds
To no one mutter overhead:

'The waters of the stream of life
Are tears that flow from women's eyes.
He thirsts again that drinks this spring,
But if he will not drink he dies.'

- James Reeves


 

Eaux de vie

L'ombre du soir a fait rentrer
Et père et mère, et fils et fille,
Qui près de la source installés
Ont bavardé, pleuré, souri.

Les pieds flânant au bord de l'eau
Et les voix dans le vent ont fui.
Les feuilles masquant les oiseaux
Seules murmurent dans la nuit :

“Les eaux du torrent de la vie
Sont larmes pleurées par les femmes.
Boire n'étanche pas l'envie,
Mais qui ne boit pas d'eau se fane.”

Traduction ©2009 Laurent Chiacchiérini


Haut de page

Let None Lament Acteon

Why should my lips, when I recall your lips,
 Shape the cry 'Artemis, O Artemis'?
Why should your lips suggest a wound, a bow,
 A crescent knife unsheathed - and not a kiss?

Why should your voice, that is so bright a singer,
 Now in my recollection seem to flow
Not from a source in some reviving pasture
 But from a mortal wilderness of snow?

And on that snow the hoofprints and the blood
 Point where the torn stag limped away to die;
The hunter's ghost still feels the foetid breath
 And hears the avenging dogs' horrific cry.

Let none lament Actaeon. Better to say:
 'Stabbed by the smile of Artemis, there died
One who was happy in his own defeat,
 Leaving her hounds the gobbets of his pride.'

- James Reeves


 

Qu'on ne pleure Actéon

Pourquoi mes lèvres quand je me souviens des tiennes
 Forment-elles ce cri : “Artémis, Artémis” ?
Pourquoi donc tes lèvres la forme d'un arc prennent,
 Non pas d'un baiser, mais d'une plaie ou d'un kriss ?

Pourquoi ta voix pourtant belle comme un ramage
 Devrait-elle dans mon esprit sembler couler
Non d'une source au creux d'un riant paturage
 Mais d'un désert mortel, de neige emmitouflé ?

Sur la neige les traces de pas et de sang
 Mènent à l'endroit où le cerf lacéré meurt ;
L'ombre qui chasse sent le souffle putrescent
 Et elle entend encore hurler les chiens vengeurs.

Qu'on ne pleure Actéon. Mieux vaut que l'on admette :
 “Ici du sourire de Diane fut percé
Celui qui bienheureux de sa propre défaite
 Laissa à ses chiens les lambeaux de sa fierté.”

Traduction ©2009 Laurent Chiacchiérini


Haut de page

The Tree of Life

I shared my garden with the tree of life,
 In whose bewildering and populous maze
Delicious birds conspired incessantly
 To steal and squander all my earnest days.

And in my room at night and in my ears
 The cunning voices of the leaves would creep.
Riddling predictions, twilight menaces
 Twitched the uneasy curtains of my sleep.

I strove one night beneath a murderer's moon
 With sharpest stroke and self-destructive rage
To fell the monster or at least some boughs
 For it was proud and obdurate with age.

And when it groaned at my demented blows
 And shuddered fearfully from bole to bud,
I saw with cry of horror on my breath
 The ground below was overrun with blood.

I share my garden with the deathless tree.
 My days and nights those voices still entrap.
What was the image by the storm-tossed moon?
 The tree of life has blood instead of sap.

- James Reeves


 

L'arbre de vie

Dans mon jardin j'avais un arbre de la vie
 Et dans son surprenant dédale populeux
Des oiseaux délicieux conspiraient sans répit
 À piller, gaspiller mes jours les plus sérieux.

Dans ma chambre la nuit au fond de mes oreilles
 Les voix des feuilles sournoises s'insinuaient.
Des augures ou menaces dissimulés
 Tordaient les voiles torturés de mon sommeil.

Je sortis sous la lune tel un assassin
 Soudainement saisi de suicidaire rage
Pour abattre le monstre ou l'ébrancher du moins
 Car il était hautain et endurci par l'âge.

Et comme il gémissait sous mes coups de dément
 Et tremblait effrayé du tronc jusqu'aux bourgeons,
Je vis avec horreur et abomination
 Que le sol en dessous était couvert de sang.

Dans mon jardin toujours l'arbre immortel était
 Et ses voix captivaient et mes jours et mes rêves
Quelle était l'image de la lune agitée ?
 L'arbre était irrigué de sang et non de sève.

Traduction ©2009 Laurent Chiacchiérini


Haut de page

Bestiary

Happy the quick-eyed lizard that pursues
 Its creviced zigzag race
Amid the epic ruins of a temple
 Leaving no trace.

Happy the weasel in the moonlit churchyard
 Twisting a vibrant thread
Of narrow life between the mounds that hide
 The important dead.

Close to the complex fabric of their world
 The small beasts live who shun
The spaces where the huge ones bellow, fight,
 And snore in the sun.

How admirable the modest and the frugal,
 The small, the neat, the furtive.
How troublesome the mammoths of this world,
 Gross and assertive.

Happy should we live in the interstices
 Of a declining age,
Even while the impudent masters of decision
 Trample and rage.

- James Reeves


 

Bestiaire

Heureux le vif lézard qui va où bon lui semble
 Parcourant les crevasses
Au beau milieu des ruines épiques d'un temple
 Sans laisser une trace.

Heureuse la belette au creux du cimetière
 Tissant un chemin fin
De vie entre les monticules funéraires
 Des illustres défunts.

Calés dans le tissu complexe de leur monde
 Les petits êtres veillent
À ne pas aller où les grands luttent et grondent
 Et ronflent au soleil.

Dignes d'admiration, les petits, les furtifs,
 Modestes et frugaux.
Ô combien encombrants, tous ces mammouths massifs,
 Suffisants et brutaux.

Heureux devrions-nous hanter les interstices
 D'une époque en déclin,
Tandis que les maîtres impudents qui régissent
  Piétinent le terrain.

Traduction ©2009 Laurent Chiacchiérini


Haut de page

Voices Loud and Low

The rainstorm stretched its harp across the sky;
The Druid played beneath the weeping cloud.
I heard his music roll among the hills
In modulation passionate and loud.

I heard the lake for ever unappeased,
The singing swan when daylight rose and fled;
I heard the chattering of the chestnut bough,
And the moon's consolation to the dead.

Painful it is to keep such secrets secret,
And yet to whom and how communicate?
Fool, knave and harlot recognise the prophet
Only with head presented on a plate.

- James Reeves


 

Des voix hautes ou basses

L'orage étend sa harpe en travers de l'azur ;
Le druide joue son air sous les nuées en pleurs.
J'entends sa musique rouler sur les pâtures
Modulée passionnément et avec ampleur.

J'entends aussi le lac à jamais tourmenté,
Le chant du cygne à l'aube et quand le jour s'endort ;
J'entends également le châtaignier chanter,
Et la lune qui vient pour consoler les morts.

Comme il est douloureux de garder ces secrets,
Et pourtant à qui et comment communiquer ?
Le commun des mortels reconnaît le prophète
Lorsque sur un plateau l'on présente sa tête.

Traduction ©2009 Laurent Chiacchiérini


Haut de page

Poet of birds

Lost bird, dead bird, dove, peacock, nightingale -
They fly and cry their way through all your page.
If it is liberty they symbolise,
How were you prisoner then, and in what cage?

- James Reeves


 

Poète des oiseaux

Perdus ou morts, colombes, paons ou rossignols :
Ils s'envolent en criant à travers ta page.
Si c'est la liberté dont ils sont les symboles,
De quoi étais-tu prisonnier, dans quelle cage ?

Traduction ©2009 Laurent Chiacchiérini


Haut de page

Discharged from Hospital

He stands upon the steps and fronts the morning.
The porter has called a taxi, and behind him
The infirmary doors have swung and come to rest.
Physician, surgeon, and anaesthetist
Have exercised their skill and he is cured.
The rabelaisian sister with the bedpan,
The vigorous masseuse, the sensual nurse
Who washes him modestly beneath a blanket,
The dawn chorus of cleaners, the almoner,
The visiting clergyman - all proceed without him.
He is alone beyond all need of them,
And the saved man goes home, to die of health.

- James Reeves


 

Départ de l'hôpital

Debout sur le perron, il fait face au matin.
Dans son dos le battement des portes s'éteint.
Le taxi appelé par l'accueil bientôt vient.
Médecins, anesthésistes et chirurgiens
Ont exercé leur art : il est guéri enfin.
L'aide-soignant rabelaisien et son bassin,
L'énergique masseur, l'infirmière discrète
Et sensuelle qui lui faisait sa toilette,
Les femmes de ménage au ballet matinal,
Le tour de l'aumônier, l'assistante sociale...
Il se retrouve seul, sans eux sur qui compter.
L'homme sauvé va mourir de bonne santé.

Traduction ©2009 Laurent Chiacchiérini


Haut de page

Things to Come

The shadow of a fat man in the moonlight
 Precedes me on the road down which I go
And should I turn and run, he would pursue me:
 This is the man whom I must get to know.

- James Reeves


 

Mon avenir

Sous la lune l'ombre d'un homme grassouillet
 Me précède le long de la route où j'avance ;
Si je me retournais pour fuir, il me suivrait :
 C'est l'homme avec qui je dois faire connaissance.

Traduction ©2009 Laurent Chiacchiérini


Haut de page

Bruges

And here, in the tiny city of the unloved,
Every third shop-window is a confectioner's,
In which daily on their walk from work
The mundane inhabitants eat heaven with their eyes.
That other heaven to which their faith consigns them
Is meanwhile populated only by sugar-angels
And the notes of bells
Breaking quarter-hourly from sky-high stone imprisonment
Like birds on scattered crumbs.
So lives the generation of the hungry
In a city piled with sweetmeats.

- James Reeves


 

Bruges

Ici, dans la bourgade des laissés-pour-compte,
Un magasin sur trois vend des confiseries
Et en rentrant le soir à pied de leur labeur
Les habitants mangent des yeux le paradis.
L'autre paradis auquel leur foi les destine
Est pour sa part peuplé d'anges en nougatine
Au son des carillons
S'abattant du haut du beffroi tous les quarts d'heure
Comme un vol de pigeons.
Ainsi vit une génération d'affamés
Au sein d'une cité faite pour les gourmets.

Traduction ©2009 Laurent Chiacchiérini


Haut de page

The Happy Boy

It is the son of tears and want
Who learns to make the future,
The circle at the tunnel's end.
But the entirely happy child
Becomes a loiterer all his life,
Looking for the private glade
And the lost dell where he played.

- James Reeves


 

L'enfant heureux

Qui a grandi dans le besoin
Apprend à construire demain,
La lumière au bout du chemin.
Qui n'a connu que le bonheur
Devient pour la vie un flâneur,
Cherchant la clairière éloignée
Et le vallon où il jouait.

Traduction ©2009 Laurent Chiacchiérini


Haut de page

The Tiger

They have sat in their wide window and approved
Irregularities of the autumn sky
Between the coasts of the sycamore and yew.
They have banished the questioning tiger from their land
Who might have resurrected the old fear
Springing like joy in the striped glades of childhood.
They have long known that the pursuing beasts
That strike at them on waking are themselves,
Have ceased to love the tiger for his hate.

- James Reeves


 

Le tigre

Assis à leur fenêtre, ils ont avalisé
Les irrégularités du ciel automnal
Entre les branches de l'if et du sycomore.
Le tigre inquisiteur est banni du décor :
Il pourrait ressusciter la peur ancestrale
Jaillissant comme joie dans les bois de l'enfance.
Conscients depuis longtemps que les bêtes qui foncent
Sur eux dès le réveil ne sont autres qu'eux-mêmes,
Ils ont cessé d'aimer le tigre pour sa haine.

Traduction ©2010 Laurent Chiacchiérini


Haut de page

Grand Opera

The lovers have poisoned themselves and died singing.
And the crushed peasant father howls in vain.
For his duplicity, lubricity and greed
The unspeakable base count is horribly slain.

After the music, after the applause,
The lights go up, the final curtain drops,
The clerks troop from the house, and some are thinking:
Why is life different when the singing stops?

All that hysteria and those histrionics,
All those coincidences were absurd.
But if there were no relevance to life,
Why were they moved to shudder and applaud?

Though they outlived that passion, it was their,
As was the jealousy, the sense of wrong
When some proud jack-in-office trampled them;
Only it did not goad them into song.

The accidents, the gross misunderstandings,
Paternal sorrow, amorous frustration,
Have they not suffered? Was the melodrama
An altogether baseless imitation?

- James Reeves


 

Grand opéra

En chantant meurent empoisonnés les amants.
Anéanti le père hurle sa peine en vain.
L'épouvantable comte, occis horriblement,
Paie sa duplicité et son appât du gain.

Après la musique et les applaudissements,
La lumière revient, le rideau de fin choit,
Les spectateurs s'en vont, certains se demandant :
Pourquoi tout change-t-il quand se taisent les voix ?

Toute cette hystérie et cet histrionisme,
Tous ces coups de théâtre absurdement ourdis.
Mais si cela est dépourvu de réalisme,
Pourquoi donc ont-ils frissonné et applaudi ?

Bien qu'ils n'en soient pas morts, la passion était leur,
Comme la jalousie, le sentiment du mal,
Quand quelque petit chef piétinait leur honneur
Sans déclencher chez eux de réaction vocale.

Accidents de la vie, grossiers malentendus,
Chagrin paternel ou frustration amoureuse,
N'en ont-ils point souffert ? Le mélodrame vu
N'était-il au final qu'une imitation creuse ?

Traduction ©2010 Laurent Chiacchiérini


Haut de page

Generation of a Critic

The eager eye that went with you to school
Reported birds' eggs in the thicket;
The heart your mother and your father split
Was healed by girls and village cricket.

The euphuistic tongue and pen you practised
To gain no other recognition
Than that boon friend's you walked or drank beside.
Then Satan told you of ambition.

He whispered fame, wealth, power - and all that;
He promised honorary degrees;
He told you no one ever made a name
By cutting other names in trees.

So now the eager eye that went to school
With jealousy has gone a-squint;
The tongue is shrill, the ink turned poison,
Getting and keeping you in print.

- James Reeves


 

Genèse d'un critique

Son regard aigu sur le chemin de l'école
Débusquait les oiseaux dans le fond des taillis.
Ses parents séparés, c'est devant le football
Et pour les filles que son cœur a tressailli.

Il pratiquait un style euphuistique et fleuri
Ne recueillant alors pour toute admiration
Que celle d'un copain, voisin de beuverie,
Jusqu'au jour où Satan lui parla d'ambition.

Il lui souffla pouvoir, fortune, et cætera...
Lui promit des honneurs à graver dans le marbre ;
Il lui dit que personne un nom ne se fera
En inscrivant le nom des autres sur les arbres.

Le regard aigu que jadis il promenait
Perclus de jalousie est désormais en biais ;
Sa langue est acérée, son encre empoisonnée,
Lui garantissant de se faire publier.

Traduction ©2010 Laurent Chiacchiérini


Haut de page

Plastic

This popular wreath, the plastic model,
 Which only the vulgar-hearted crave,
Will last when every swollen noddle
 That wears it will be in the grave.
Yet who'd preserve a thing so cheap
 So dearly bought at any cost?
Its place is on the rubbish heap:
 True fame is neither sought nor lost.

- James Reeves


 

Plastique

Cet objet de désir, la couronne en plastique
 À laquelle n'aspire que les cœurs vulgaires,
Durera bien après, c'est un fait pathétique,
 Que ceux qui en sont ceints seront six pieds sous terre.
À quoi bon conserver cet objet bon marché
 Quand bien même il a pu être payé si cher ?
Sa place est à chercher sur un tas de déchets :
 La vraie renommée ne s'achète ni se perd.

Traduction ©2010 Laurent Chiacchiérini


Haut de page

Demigods

We demigods can't be too careful, see.
Stricter proprieties hedge us. One slip-up
Can get us a bad name both in heaven and earth.
One of us lies or cheats and some god says
Well, he's half-human-what can you expect?
Another whores or drinks himself to death
And all men vilify his godly vices.
It's hard. But with the gods, how different!

All that they do enhances their prestige,
Or is officially overlooked; or else
Is twisted to adorn the personal legends
They've nothing else to do but manufacture.

Incest or sodomy, it's all the same,
A god must have some respite from his cares.
And erring humans claim divine protection;
But demigods have got to mind their steps.

- James Reeves


 

Demi-dieux

La prudence est d'or pour nous autres demi-dieux.
Nous sommes surveillés et le moindre faux pas
Peut ruiner notre nom sur terre comme aux cieux.
Que l'un de nous mente ou triche et un dieu dira :
Que fallait-il attendre d'un demi-humain ?
Qu'un autre aille au bordel ou qu'il s'enivre à mort,
Alors tous les mortels pointent ses divins torts.
C'est dur mais pour les dieux, tout autre est le chemin !

Chaque acte de leur part rehausse leur prestige,
Est passé sous silence ou bien est déformé
Afin d'alimenter leur liste de prodiges
Qu'ils n'ont rien de mieux à faire que de forger.

Inceste ou sodomie, c'est du pareil au même :
Tout leur est toléré pour le repos des dieux.
Les humains implorent leur protection suprême ;
Les demi-dieux eux doivent marcher sur des œufs.

Traduction ©2010 Laurent Chiacchiérini


Haut de page

No tears for Miss Macassar

No tears for Miss Macassar, dispossessed
Three times by an inflexible landlord
Of that small tenement in which she housed
Her ominous, gaunt person and the hoard
Of keepsakes, water-colours, ferns and china.
She and her framed, clerical relations
Now to fresh scenes remove and to new neighbours.
She, stoical connoisseur of all privations,
Treasures her grievances like vintage wine.
So tears for Miss Macassar would be wrong:
She is no miser and too well she knows
Good wine is better shared than kept too long.

- James Reeves


 

Pas de larmes pour Miss Macassar

Pas de larmes pour elle, expulsée par trois fois
Par un propriétaire inflexible et sans cœur
De ce vieux logement, de son petit chez-soi,
Là où elle entassait, décharnée, faisant peur,
Souvenirs, porcelaine, aquarelles, fougères.
Elle et ses relations soudain déménagèrent
Vers d'autres horizons et de nouveaux voisins.
Chérissant ses malheurs autant qu'un très vieux vin,
Stoïque, elle apprécie ce dont elle est privée.
Pleurer Miss Macassar serait fort déplacé :
Elle n'est pas avare et trop bien elle sait
Qu'un bon vin est meilleur partagé qu'encavé.

Traduction ©2010 Laurent Chiacchiérini


Haut de page

The Blameless One

He, the blameless one, exploring crime
Tried theft and gave the money to the poor;
Slandered and lied and cheated and confessed,
Ran disillusioned from the harlot's door.
Scribbled on walls and washed them clean again
By way of restitution to the city.
Committed arson, called the fire-brigade,
Solicited a cripple from sheer pity.
Finally in a rage of self-reproach
He met an enemy who had been his friend,
Sharpened his knife and followed out of doors,
Thinking 'At last - now I shall make an end.'
The blade struck. Ridiculously the head rolled off.
Appalled he took the only possible course,
Opened his shirt and drove the knife in hard;
Then woke, shrieking with triumph and remorse.

- James Reeves


 

L'irréprochable

Lui, dit irréprochable, il se fit hors-la-loi,
Il s'essaya au vol, donna aux misérables,
Fuit désabusé de chez la fille de joie,
Mentit, tricha, trompa, fit amende honorable.
Graffitait sur les murs et puis les nettoyait
Pour les rendre à la ville, acte de contrition.
Jouait au pyromane, appelait les pompiers,
Racola une infirme en pure compassion.
Enfin tenaillé par un accès de remords,
Croisant un ennemi, autrefois son ami,
Il aiguisa sa lame et le suivit dehors,
Songeant : “Il est grand temps que le terme y soit mis.”
Il frappa ; la tête risiblement roula.
Saisi d'horreur, il prit la seule voie possible :
Il ouvrit sa chemise et il se poignarda ;
Puis il se réveilla, poussant un cri terrible.

Traduction ©2010 Laurent Chiacchiérini


Haut de page

Rainless

Roots in the darkened garden drink the rain
Where in the sun we walked some hours ago.
My need, no less than theirs, unguessed by you,
To take you in my arms and perpetrate
An undeclaring and forbidden love
Revives in me what was an habit once.
It is endurable-as is the thought
There is no problem where is no solution.
So, like a statue that no kiss evokes,
You to my inner eye make manifest,
Recall that sculptors turn their love to stone
Creating flesh beyond the reach of passion.
Then let the garden drink its fill; my roots
Need no one's pity, least of all my own.

- James Reeves


 

Assoiffé

Le jardin assombri boit les gouttes de pluie
Là où nous marchions au soleil l'après-midi.
Mon identique soif, de toi soupçonnée,
De te prendre en mes bras et de m'abandonner
À un amour inavoué et défendu
Ranime en moi ce qui jadis si courant fut.
Cela m'est supportable ainsi que la notion
Qu'il n'est de problème qui n'ait sa solution.
Tout comme une statue aucun baiser n'appelle,
À mon œil intérieur tu es là qui rappelles
Que les sculpteurs tournent leur amour vers la pierre,
Créant au-delà de la passion de la chair.
Que le jardin boive son soûl ; je n'ai besoin
De nul apitoiement, du mien encore moins.

Traduction ©2010 Laurent Chiacchiérini


Haut de page

Important Insects

Important insects clamber to the top
Of stalks; look round with uninquiring eyes
And find the world incomprehensible;
Then totter back to earth and circumscribe
Irregular territories pointlessly.
Some insects narcissistically assume
Patterns of spots or stripes or burnished sheen
For purposes of sex or camouflage,
Some tweet or rasp though most are without speech
Except low subliminal mindless chatter.
Take heart: those scientists are wrong who find
Elements of the human in their systems,
Despite their busy, devious trafficking
Important insects simply do not matter.

- James Reeves


 

Insectes importants

Ils grimpent tout en haut des tiges,
Regardent autour sans vertige
Et n'y comprenant rien bien vite
Redescendent et délimitent
Quelque irrégulier territoire.
Certains narcissiques se parent
D'éclat, de bandes ou de taches
Pour l'amour ou le camouflage ;
Quoique la plupart soient muets,
D'aucuns font quelques bruits discrets.
Courage : les savants ont tort
D'y voir quelque chose d'humain ;
Malgré leurs apparents efforts,
Ces insectes n'importent point.

Traduction ©2010 Laurent Chiacchiérini


Haut de page

Evolution of a Painter

Beneath a pastoral sky, spotted by shadows,
Only by your young, talented eye regarded,
The two farm horses stood, unkempt and useful.
Your heart approved as your deft brush recorded.
One notes the skill; surprised, one notes the love,
And pensive, calm content the scene afforded.

For that was forty years ago, since when
The stoical farm beast has been abolished.
Not so your art, though now the patrons call
For something more expensive and embellished.
Proudly your valuable racers prance
Over the emerald turf, well combed and polished.

We need not twist our mouths with scorn to see
A pretty talent gone corrupt and hard.
Better than you have sold out for champagne.
Enough to know there is, where few regard,
The evidence of your compassion once,
In that ill-lit provincial gallery stored.

- James Reeves


 

Évolution d'un peintre

Sous un ciel pastoral où les ombres jouaient,
De toi seul observés, par ton jeune œil doué,
Les deux chevaux de trait hirsutes se dressaient.
Ton cœur acquiesçait à ce qu'adroit tu brossais.
L'on y voit du talent et, surpris, de l'amour
Et la sérénité de la scène alentour.

Quarante ans ont passé, depuis cette période,
Le stoïque animal a été aboli.
Ton art est toujours là, mais les clients raffolent
D'une œuvre plus coûteuse et encore embellie.
Fièrement tes chevaux de course caracolent
Bien peignés et luisants, sur le turf émeraude.

Nul besoin de mépris ni de bouches tordues
De voir un beau talent aujourd'hui corrompu.
De meilleurs que toi ont succombé au champagne.
Il suffit de savoir que loin des attentions
Il subsiste la preuve de ta compassion
Là-bas dans l'obscure galerie de campagne.

Traduction ©2010 Laurent Chiacchiérini


Haut de page

Command your Devil

Command your devil to lie down and dream.
When he is active, his lascivious eye
Maddens your mind for nothing but the touch
Of furtive hand on hand, thigh against thigh.
All that your wolfish greed contrives will be
A lonely festival of self-disgust,
A murderer's remorse without the blood
The meagre satisfaction of your lust.
So let your devil stalk with you no more
But stay at home and dream. The acts of vice,
The conquests he can fabricate for you
Will your imagination more entice
Than chance encounters quitted with revulsion.
The devil's fantasies use no compulsion.

- James Reeves


 

Commande au démon

Commande à ce démon en toi de sommeiller.
Car son regard lascif lorsqu'il est éveillé
Affole ton esprit au moindre effleurement
D'une main, d'une cuisse, osé furtivement.
Tout ce qu'engendrera ton appétit de loup
Sera ta sensation d'égoïste dégoût,
Remords du meurtrier sans le parfum du sang,
Maigre satisfaction de ton désir pressant.
Commande au démon de ne plus partir en chasse,
Qu'il reste à la maison tranquille et qu'il rêvasse.
Les conquêtes que pour toi il inventera
Stimuleront bien plus ton imagination
Que les rencontres quittées avec embarras.
Les fantasmes du diable échappent aux pulsions.

Traduction ©2010 Laurent Chiacchiérini


Haut de page

An Academic

How sad, they think, to see him homing nightly
In converse with himself across the quad,
Down by the river and the railway arch
To his gaunt villa and his squabbling brood,
His wife anchored beside a hill of mending.
Such banal evenings - how they pity him.

By day his food is Plato, Machiavelli,
'Thought is a flower, gentlemen,' he says -
Tracing the thought in air until it grows
Like frost-flowers on the windows of the mind -
'Thought is a flower that has its roots in dung.'
What irony, they think, that one so nourished,
Perfect in all the classic commonwealths,
Himself so signally should lack the arts
To shine and burgeon in the College councils,
A worn-out battery, a nobody, a windbag.
'And yet,' they sigh, 'what has the old boy got,
That every time he talks he fills the hall?'

- James Reeves


 

L'universitaire

Que triste il leur paraît, rentrant le soir à pied,
Soliloquant en traversant la cour carrée,
Le long de la rivière et de la voie ferrée,
Vers sa villa lugubre et sa progéniture,
Sa femme absorbée par un monceau de couture.
Quelle banalité... comme il leur fait pitié.

De Platon, Machiavel, le jour il se nourrit ;
“La fleur de la pensée...”, voilà ce qu'il leur dit,
En dessinant dans l'air la pensée qui grandit
Comme du givre sur les vitres de l'esprit,
“La fleur de la pensée pousse sur le fumier.”
Quelle ironie de voir quelqu'un si imprégné,
Parfaitement au fait de tous les grands classiques,
Manquer cruellement de talent politique
Pour briller et fleurir au Conseil de l'École :
Pile usée... le néant... un moulin à paroles.
Comment s'y prend-il donc, et par quelle invention,
Pour faire salle comble à chaque intervention ?

Traduction ©2011 Laurent Chiacchiérini


Haut de page

The Half-full Glass

I told you I was drained of happiness.
The wine was only half way down our glasses.
You said to me, 'Are you not happy now?'
Searching my heart, I had to own I was.
How Should I not be, drinking wine with You?
'Whatever dies was not mixed equally,'
Donne said. If so, love is without death,
For half the happiness of meeting you
Is pain at knowing we must separate;
And therefore love can never be complete.
A glass untasted, and an empty glass,
Are nothing but mere hope and memory.
The glass in which I drink your health contains
Now and always half emptiness, half wine.

- James Reeves


 

Le verre à moitié plein

Je te dis que j'étais tout vidé de bonheur,
Quand le vin dans mon verre était à mi-hauteur.
“N'es-tu, demandas-tu, donc pas heureux ici ?”
Interrogeant mon cœur, je reconnus que si.
Et comment ne pas l'être, à trinquer à ta table ?
“Ce qui meurt n'était pas fait de parts équitables”,
Le poète a-t-il dit. L'amour n'a donc de fin :
La moitié du bonheur de s'être rencontrés
Me fait mal à l'idée d'un jour nous séparer,
C'est pourquoi notre amour ne saurait être plein.
Un verre non goûté et un autre éclusé
Ne sont rien qu'un espoir ou un fait du passé.
Le verre que je bois à ta santé contient
Plus que jamais autant de vide que de vin.

Traduction ©2011 Laurent Chiacchiérini


Haut de page

The Newcomer

They who minister to the cattle of this land
And side by side the deliberate furrows laid
Lounge now at ease beneath the merciful blue
In the kneeling elm trees' or the hedgerow's shade.
My steps beside the fields of County Down
They marked with curious but encouraging eye,
And the close hedges between which I walked
Seemed to me equally kind and equally shy.

Softly I went, as if to overhear
A hidden life beneath the moss and fern,
But caught only the random tunes of birds
Whose names, regretfully, I could never learn.
Only the rooks cantankerous overhead
And roosters unambiguously professed
A pastoral order long established there
In which I moved half inmate and half guest.

And when the unobtrusive scent of briar,
Honeysuckle, elderberry and drying hay
From grove and pasture in unseen procession
Came out to greet the traveller on his way,
It was as if the gentlest of the dead
Welcomed the latest comer to their land,
Spectre to spectre nodding reassurance
And proffering their gifts with timid hand.

- James Reeves


 

Nouveau venu

Ceux qui veillent que le cheptel soit bien soigné
Et que les sillons soient côte à côte alignés
Désormais vont muser sous l'azur indulgent
A l'ombre des haies et des ormes prosternés.
D'un œil à la fois curieux et encourageant,
Ils observent mes pas à travers le comté
Dont les haies serrées où je vais me promener
Me paraissent mêler embarras et bonté.

Je marche doucement, m'efforçant d'écouter
Une vie tapie sous la mousse et la fougère
Mais j'entend seulement certains oiseaux chanter
Dont les appellations me restent étrangères.
Seuls les freux d'humeur acariâtre dans le ciel
Et les coqs professent sans grande ambiguïté
Un ordre pastoral de tout temps officiel
Où j'évolue mi-résident mi-invité.

Quand le discret parfum montant de la bruyère
Et ceux du sureau, du chèvrefeuille et du foin,
Cortège invisible dans les prés et clairières,
Viennent accueillir le voyageur en chemin,
On dirait un peu que les plus doux des défunts
Souhaitent la bienvenue au dernier arrivé,
Tels des spectres le réconfortant un par un
Et offrant leurs présents la main mal assurée.

Traduction ©2013 Laurent Chiacchiérini


Haut de page